Jump to content

Why do we talk about RAM in Mhz still?

For well over a decade effective speeds of RAM have been over 1Ghz, since DDR2 1066. Now we have DDR4 3600, DDR3 2133, and DDR5 6400 on the horizon. When CPU's surpassed the 1Ghz barrier we didn't call them 1100Mhz, we called them 1.1Ghz immediately. How come the same isn't true of RAM nomenclature? If it were simply because the actual speeds were 1/2 the effective speeds then sure, but with DDR3 and 4 routinely being sold at speeds past 2000Mhz effective the actual speeds are also above 1000Mhz. [Seinfeld] So what's the deal with this RAM speed naming thing anyways?[/Seinfeld]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, Bitter said:

For well over a decade effective speeds of RAM have been over 1Ghz, since DDR2 1066. Now we have DDR4 3600, DDR3 2133, and DDR5 6400 on the horizon. When CPU's surpassed the 1Ghz barrier we didn't call them 1100Mhz, we called them 1.1Ghz immediately. How come the same isn't true of RAM nomenclature? If it were simply because the actual speeds were 1/2 the effective speeds then sure, but with DDR3 and 4 routinely being sold at speeds past 2000Mhz effective the actual speeds are also above 1000Mhz. [Seinfeld] So what's the deal with this RAM speed naming thing anyways?[/Seinfeld]

I've often wondered that too. I don't have an answer.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, Bitter said:

So what's the deal with this RAM speed naming thing anyways?[/Seinfeld]

It's harder to say 2.933GHz than it is to say 2933MHz

CPU: Intel Core i7-950 Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-X58A-UD3R CPU Cooler: NZXT HAVIK 140 RAM: Corsair Dominator DDR3-1600 (1x2GB), Crucial DDR3-1600 (2x4GB), Crucial Ballistix Sport DDR3-1600 (1x4GB) GPU: ASUS GeForce GTX 770 DirectCU II 2GB SSD: Samsung 860 EVO 2.5" 1TB HDDs: WD Green 3.5" 1TB, WD Blue 3.5" 1TB PSU: Corsair AX860i & CableMod ModFlex Cables Case: Fractal Design Meshify C TG (White) Fans: 2x Dynamic X2 GP-12 Monitors: LG 24GL600F, Samsung S24D390 Keyboard: Logitech G710+ Mouse: Logitech G502 Proteus Spectrum Mouse Pad: Steelseries QcK Audio: Bose SoundSport In-Ear Headphones

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd guess they'll use the current scale until the standard is written not to use that scale. The marketing speed (which is NOT MHz) is part of the standard name used in speed grades.

Gaming system: R7 7800X3D, Asus ROG Strix B650E-F Gaming Wifi, Thermalright Phantom Spirit 120 SE ARGB, Corsair Vengeance 2x 32GB 6000C30, RTX 4070, MSI MPG A850G, Fractal Design North, Samsung 990 Pro 2TB, Alienware AW3225QF (32" 240 Hz OLED)
Productivity system: i9-7980XE, Asus X299 TUF mark 2, Noctua D15, 64GB ram (mixed), RTX 3070, NZXT E850, GameMax Abyss, Samsung 980 Pro 2TB, iiyama ProLite XU2793QSU-B6 (27" 1440p 100 Hz)
Gaming laptop: Lenovo Legion 5, 5800H, RTX 3070, Kingston DDR4 3200C22 2x16GB 2Rx8, Kingston Fury Renegade 1TB + Crucial P1 1TB SSD, 165 Hz IPS 1080p G-Sync Compatible

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, Bitter said:

For well over a decade effective speeds of RAM have been over 1Ghz, since DDR2 1066. Now we have DDR4 3600, DDR3 2133, and DDR5 6400 on the horizon. When CPU's surpassed the 1Ghz barrier we didn't call them 1100Mhz, we called them 1.1Ghz immediately. How come the same isn't true of RAM nomenclature? If it were simply because the actual speeds were 1/2 the effective speeds then sure, but with DDR3 and 4 routinely being sold at speeds past 2000Mhz effective the actual speeds are also above 1000Mhz. [Seinfeld] So what's the deal with this RAM speed naming thing anyways?[/Seinfeld]

Man you have to take that up with the tech people and companies lol,  they like to say DDR4 3200 .... so we know its 3200mhz.  I say both CPU and RAM both in Mhz so people will understand better ya know...

Asus Sabertooth x79 / 4930k @ 4500 @ 1.408v / Gigabyte WF 2080 RTX / Corsair VG 64GB @ 1866 & AX1600i & H115i Pro @ 2x Noctua NF-A14 / Carbide 330r Blackout

Scarlett 2i2 Audio Interface / KRK Rokits 10" / Sennheiser HD 650 / Logitech G Pro Wireless Mouse & G915 Linear & G935 & C920 / SL 88 Grand / Cakewalk / NF-A14 Int P12 Ex
AOC 40" 4k Curved / LG 55" OLED C9 120hz / LaCie Porsche Design 2TB & 500GB / Samsung 950 Pro 500GB / 850 Pro 500GB / Crucial m4 500GB / Asus M.2 Card

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the most likely and obvious reason is convention... because that's how everyone has been doing it for so long...

 

It could also be that 3200Mhz sounds bigger than 3.2Ghz to tech illiterate people and that using Ghz for both CPU and RAM may confuse those same people. Just think of how often people confuse RAM and drive space already. But to be honest, I think the biggest reason is probably just convention. It's the same thing with GPU clocks, they don't use Ghz even though they could at this point.

Primary PC-

CPU: Intel i7-6800k @ 4.2-4.4Ghz   CPU COOLER: Bequiet Dark Rock Pro 4   MOBO: MSI X99A SLI Plus   RAM: 32GB Corsair Vengeance LPX quad-channel DDR4-2800  GPU: EVGA GTX 1080 SC2 iCX   PSU: Corsair RM1000i   CASE: Corsair 750D Obsidian   SSDs: 500GB Samsung 960 Evo + 256GB Samsung 850 Pro   HDDs: Toshiba 3TB + Seagate 1TB   Monitors: Acer Predator XB271HUC 27" 2560x1440 (165Hz G-Sync)  +  LG 29UM57 29" 2560x1080   OS: Windows 10 Pro

Album

Other Systems:

Spoiler

Home HTPC/NAS-

CPU: AMD FX-8320 @ 4.4Ghz  MOBO: Gigabyte 990FXA-UD3   RAM: 16GB dual-channel DDR3-1600  GPU: Gigabyte GTX 760 OC   PSU: Rosewill 750W   CASE: Antec Gaming One   SSD: 120GB PNY CS1311   HDDs: WD Red 3TB + WD 320GB   Monitor: Samsung SyncMaster 2693HM 26" 1920x1200 -or- Steam Link to Vizio M43C1 43" 4K TV  OS: Windows 10 Pro

 

Offsite NAS/VM Server-

CPU: 2x Xeon E5645 (12-core)  Model: Dell PowerEdge T610  RAM: 16GB DDR3-1333  PSUs: 2x 570W  SSDs: 8GB Kingston Boot FD + 32GB Sandisk Cache SSD   HDDs: WD Red 4TB + Seagate 2TB + Seagate 320GB   OS: FreeNAS 11+

 

Laptop-

CPU: Intel i7-3520M   Model: Dell Latitude E6530   RAM: 8GB dual-channel DDR3-1600  GPU: Nvidia NVS 5200M   SSD: 240GB TeamGroup L5   HDD: WD Black 320GB   Monitor: Samsung SyncMaster 2693HM 26" 1920x1200   OS: Windows 10 Pro

Having issues with a Corsair AIO? Possible fix here:

Spoiler

Are you getting weird fan behavior, speed fluctuations, and/or other issues with Link?

Are you running AIDA64, HWinfo, CAM, or HWmonitor? (ASUS suite & other monitoring software often have the same issue.)

Corsair Link has problems with some monitoring software so you may have to change some settings to get them to work smoothly.

-For AIDA64: First make sure you have the newest update installed, then, go to Preferences>Stability and make sure the "Corsair Link sensor support" box is checked and make sure the "Asetek LC sensor support" box is UNchecked.

-For HWinfo: manually disable all monitoring of the AIO sensors/components.

-For others: Disable any monitoring of Corsair AIO sensors.

That should fix the fan issue for some Corsair AIOs (H80i GT/v2, H110i GTX/H115i, H100i GTX and others made by Asetek). The problem is bad coding in Link that fights for AIO control with other programs. You can test if this worked by setting the fan speed in Link to 100%, if it doesn't fluctuate you are set and can change the curve to whatever. If that doesn't work or you're still having other issues then you probably still have a monitoring software interfering with the AIO/Link communications, find what it is and disable it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

14 minutes ago, Geography said:

It's harder to say 2.933GHz than it is to say 2933MHz

A 350ci or a 5.7L engine are often not exactly that size, we round. We round for CPU speeds too, as the speeds got higher the little numbers became truncated. A 2993Mhz CPU because 2.9Ghz and no one cared.

11 minutes ago, porina said:

I'd guess they'll use the current scale until the standard is written not to use that scale. The marketing speed (which is NOT MHz) is part of the standard name used in speed grades.

I do realize that the marketing speed is often times used as well, PC3-14200 for example, which could be shortened to PC3-14G since 14200MB/S is roughly 14GB/S.

 

4 minutes ago, pyrojoe34 said:

I think the most likely and obvious reason is convention... because that's how everyone has been doing it for so long...

 

It could also be that 3200Mhz sounds bigger than 3.2Ghz to tech illiterate people and that using Ghz for both CPU and RAM may confuse those same people. Just think of how often people confuse RAM and drive space already. But to be honest, I think the biggest reason is probably just convention. It's the same thing with GPU clocks, they don't use Ghz even though they could at this point.

Well convention be damned, I'm going to Ghz all the things!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

Likely convention, and likely because using a decimal point would look weird. I think DDR4-3200 looks better than DDR4-3.2 or  say DDR4-2.667. It almost looks like a version number too.

 

Plus almost every CPU made in the past 10 years has been based on a 100 MHz base clock and simply multiplied.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

Sticking with MHz sounds bigger I guess lol

Phone 1 (Daily Driver): Samsung Galaxy Z Fold2 5G

Phone 2 (Work): Samsung Galaxy S21 Ultra 5G 256gb

Laptop 1 (Production): 16" MBP2019, i7, 5500M, 32GB DDR4, 2TB SSD

Laptop 2 (Gaming): Toshiba Qosmio X875, i7 3630QM, GTX 670M, 16GB DDR3

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

the bigger the number the better the performance obviously

Before you reply to my post, REFRESH. 99.99% chance I edited my post. 

 

My System: i7-13700KF // Corsair iCUE H150i Elite Capellix // MSI MPG Z690 Edge Wifi // 32GB DDR5 G. SKILL RIPJAWS S5 6000 CL32 // Nvidia RTX 4070 Super FE // Corsair 5000D Airflow // Corsair SP120 RGB Pro x7 // Seasonic Focus Plus Gold 850w //1TB ADATA XPG SX8200 Pro/1TB Teamgroup MP33/2TB Seagate 7200RPM Hard Drive // Displays: LG Ultragear 32GP83B x2 // Royal Kludge RK100 // Logitech G Pro X Superlight // Sennheiser DROP PC38x

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

Because while some of the more common frequencies work with only a single decimal point when using gigahertz, lots of them don't. With CPU's the stock speed is always a multiple of 100, because that's the base clock. It's also why GPU's still use megahertz.

Make sure to quote or tag me (@JoostinOnline) or I won't see your response!

PSU Tier List  |  The Real Reason Delidding Improves Temperatures"2K" does not mean 2560×1440 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

875-06546954en_Masterfile.jpg

875-06546954en_Masterfile.jpg

(◣_◢) Ryzen 5 3600,   Aorus X370 K7,   XPG 16GB 3200,   Gigabyte 2070 Windforce Corsair RM650x,   LG 32GK650F-B 31.5" 144Hz QHD FreeSync VA,   Kingston 120GB SSD,   Samsung 1TB 860 QVO,   2TB HDD,   Fractal Design Meshify C,   Corsair K63 Wireless,   Corsair Gaming M65 PRO,   Audio Technica ATH M50x,   Windows 10 ProCorsair H100x 240mm.  (◣_◢)

(◣_◢) Ryzen 5 1600,   Noctua NH-L12S,   Gigabyte GTX 1060 6G,   ASUS Prime B350 Plus,   HyperX Fury 8GB DDR4 (2666MHz - 1.3v),   SilverStone ET550-B,   Kingston 120GB SSD 2TB HDD,   Cougar MX330,   Windows 10 Pro.  (◣_◢)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

8 minutes ago, JoostinOnline said:

Because while some of the more common frequencies work with only a single decimal point when using gigahertz, lots of them don't. With CPU's the stock speed is always a multiple of 100, because that's the base clock. It's also why GPU's still use megahertz.

 

2 hours ago, Mira Yurizaki said:

Likely convention, and likely because using a decimal point would look weird. I think DDR4-3200 looks better than DDR4-3.2 or  say DDR4-2.667. It almost looks like a version number too.

 

Plus almost every CPU made in the past 10 years has been based on a 100 MHz base clock and simply multiplied.

So this didn't used to always be the case and certainly was not the case when RAM surpassed the 1000Mhz effective speed threshold. The Intel Core2 line had many CPU's tagged with 3.33ghz or 2.66Ghz or similar, and it was fine. DDR4 2.66Ghz or DDR4 2.6...I dunno. Just seems weird that we're stuck on Mhz for some parts and using Ghz on other parts, when all the parts are in the speed range of Ghz. It would be like saying you're traveling 3000 meters down the road but saying you're going 3 kilometers makes much more sense, yea?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

6 minutes ago, Bitter said:

So this didn't used to always be the case and certainly was not the case when RAM surpassed the 1000Mhz effective speed threshold. The Intel Core2 line had many CPU's tagged with 3.33ghz or 2.66Ghz or similar, and it was fine. DDR4 2.66Ghz or DDR4 2.6...I dunno. Just seems weird that we're stuck on Mhz for some parts and using Ghz on other parts, when all the parts are in the speed range of Ghz. It would be like saying you're traveling 3000 meters down the road but saying you're going 3 kilometers makes much more sense, yea?

Well thinking about it more, it may be more harmful to shorthand RAM speeds because the system has a requirement for RAM speeds. A requirement that has a tolerance to it. It may be that we can shorthand it down to the megahertz scale because this is the most deviation the system can tolerate.

 

CPU speeds don't need a level of precision because the system doesn't care.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

4 minutes ago, Mira Yurizaki said:

Well thinking about it more, it may be more harmful to shorthand RAM speeds because the system has a requirement for RAM speeds. A requirement that has a tolerance to it. It may be that we can shorthand it down to the megahertz scale because this is the most deviation the system can tolerate.

 

CPU speeds don't need a level of precision because the system doesn't care.

tumblr_p3wtpirB2g1sgl0ajo1_400.gif

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

In addition to what @Mira Yurizaki said, I think it also has a little bit to do with marketing. People see more/higher numbers and they think it's better, faster, stronger etc. That's what I think anyway. There's always something to do with marketing, even if it's in a small way.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

Can't wait for the day we get 10000+ Mhz RAM.

In all seriousness, they just need to skip whatever RAM speed would be in between two multiple of 100s in order to switch to GHz without any issues. Like DDR4 3000, 3200, 3300, 3333, 3400, 3466, 3600... etc for 3.0, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4, 3.6 GHz.... Much shorter on a box to print.

But it just doesn't have as much "impact" I guess as a seemingly bigger number for the mainstream users who may not know any better.

CPU: AMD Ryzen 3700x / GPU: Asus Radeon RX 6750XT OC 12GB / RAM: Corsair Vengeance LPX 2x8GB DDR4-3200
MOBO: MSI B450m Gaming Plus / NVME: Corsair MP510 240GB / Case: TT Core v21 / PSU: Seasonic 750W / OS: Win 10 Pro

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't feel like main stream users are buying and upgrading ram tho? Mainstream users have ipads and laptops with soldered RAM and CPU.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

50 minutes ago, Bitter said:

I don't feel like main stream users are buying and upgrading ram tho? Mainstream users have ipads and laptops with soldered RAM and CPU.

A good number of people that come here asking for advice or help for their first build don't generally know what they're doing (hence why they come here). So those "mainstream" users don't have any sort of knowledge or insight when it comes to the numbers and marketing tactics. That and, "mainstream" can mean a lot of things. Like for example RGB is mainstream in the custom PC building industry. It's all in how you perceive it I guess.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×