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Syntaxvgm

House passes bill to save Net Neutrality, idiots on Reddit celebrate too early- McConnell to block it from Senate floor as he said before vote

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Posted · Original PosterOP
29 minutes ago, DrMacintosh said:

McCain did xD 

BE432F19-7B1E-4847-89AD-0D3975301D1B.jpeg.a46ee911d2172afd9bf07e8c9e0ce3e0.jpeg

550F8D70-5C2D-4C6C-9D06-99D16B1A6B08.jpeg.d2c92b1abf33052e298136f5d3318526.jpeg

Hate to say this, following your party's agenda doesn't matter when you have a death sentence. 


muh specs 

Gaming and HTPC (reparations)- ASUS 1080, MSI X99A SLI Plus, 5820k- 4.5GHz @ 1.25v, asetek based 360mm AIO, RM 1000x, 16GB memory, 750D with front USB 2.0 replaced with 3.0  ports, 2 250GB 850 EVOs in Raid 0 (why not, only has games on it), some hard drives

Screens- Acer preditor XB241H (1080p, 144Hz Gsync), LG 1080p ultrawide, (all mounted) directly wired to TV in other room

Stuff- k70 with reds, steel series rival, g13, full desk covering mouse mat

All parts black

Workstation(desk)- 3770k, 970 reference, 16GB of some crucial memory, a motherboard of some kind I don't remember, Micomsoft SC-512N1-L/DVI, CM Storm Trooper (It's got a handle, can you handle that?), 240mm Asetek based AIO, Crucial M550 256GB (upgrade soon), some hard drives, disc drives, and hot swap bays

Screens- 3  ASUS VN248H-P IPS 1080p screens mounted on a stand, some old tv on the wall above it. 

Stuff- Epicgear defiant (solderless swappable switches), g600, moutned mic and other stuff. 

Laptop docking area- 2 1440p korean monitors mounted, one AHVA matte, one samsung PLS gloss (very annoying, yes). Trashy Razer blackwidow chroma...I mean like the J key doesn't click anymore. I got a model M i use on it to, but its time for a new keyboard. Some edgy Utechsmart mouse similar to g600. Hooked to laptop dock for both of my dell precision laptops. (not only docking area)

Shelf- i7-2600 non-k (has vt-d), 380t, some ASUS sandy itx board, intel quad nic. Currently hosts shared files, setting up as pfsense box in VM. Also acts as spare gaming PC with a 580 or whatever someone brings. Hooked into laptop dock area via usb switch

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Also, the Tweeter-in-chief said he'll veto it.

https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2019/04/house-votes-to-restore-net-neutrality-as-white-house-threatens-trump-veto/

 

If you ask me, it is important to publicly show that people like them putting their interests over people's interests. Will it change anything in long term? Who knows. 


The ability to google properly is a skill of its own. 

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50 minutes ago, Bouzoo said:

Also, the Tweeter-in-chief said he'll veto it.

https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2019/04/house-votes-to-restore-net-neutrality-as-white-house-threatens-trump-veto/

 

If you ask me, it is important to publicly show that people like them putting their interests over people's interests. Will it change anything in long term? Who knows. 

I still don't get why Google didn't get something through around 2013. This was a complete botch job by their lobbying department.

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Meanwhile: A bipartisan bill is in waiting to forbid the IRS from creating a free electronic (online) system by which citizens can file their taxes, thus giving corporations carte blanche to stop offering citizens the ability to file their taxes online, for free. This will be because right now, the IRS has a deal in place with these companies saying "we won't develop a system for people to file their taxes for free, so long as you give them the option to file for free". There is nuance to this agreement, but basically if the IRS is forbidden by law from developing such a system, these companies no longer have any reason to offer you the ability to file your taxes for free.

 

The authors are a democrat and a republican, the supporters have received donations from the likes of Turbotax and H&R block.

 

Notice how bipartisanship only happens when no one is paying attention and it benefits no one other than those who have been elected?

 

These idiots are going to push things until 1776 part 2 is the only viable option for the American People. Sadly I fear the consequences (outcome) of that, more than what these idiots will do, given enough time.

 

Stop voting for parties, stop voting for anyone with a party symbol next to their name.


Computer's don't make errors. What they do, they do on purpose. By now your name and particulars have been fed into every laptop, desktop, mainframe and supermarket scanner that collectively make up the global information conspiracy, otherwise known as The Beast.

 

You just be careful. Computers have already beaten the Communists at chess. Next thing you know, they'll be beating humans.

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Posted · Original PosterOP
2 hours ago, Trik'Stari said:

Meanwhile: A bipartisan bill is in waiting to forbid the IRS from creating a free electronic (online) system by which citizens can file their taxes, thus giving corporations carte blanche to stop offering citizens the ability to file their taxes online, for free. This will be because right now, the IRS has a deal in place with these companies saying "we won't develop a system for people to file their taxes for free, so long as you give them the option to file for free". There is nuance to this agreement, but basically if the IRS is forbidden by law from developing such a system, these companies no longer have any reason to offer you the ability to file your taxes for free.

 

The authors are a democrat and a republican, the supporters have received donations from the likes of Turbotax and H&R block.

 

Notice how bipartisanship only happens when no one is paying attention and it benefits no one other than those who have been elected?

 

These idiots are going to push things until 1776 part 2 is the only viable option for the American People. Sadly I fear the consequences (outcome) of that, more than what these idiots will do, given enough time.

 

Stop voting for parties, stop voting for anyone with a party symbol next to their name.

God this shit. Already had my rant on this. 

Quote

Turbotax and everyone related to it is a cancer on the less informed when it comes to taxes. So this year my taxes went up, and now this? This is so clearly fucking corrupt. The IRS barred from making an electronic filing system. Why? Literally what other excuse could they give for this other than money for the tax filing software companies? There's not even a typical thin excuse to give here. "We sold out to corporate interests" is literally all you can say about this. I'm surprised there's enough money there for anyone to vote on something they can't even spin. 

 


muh specs 

Gaming and HTPC (reparations)- ASUS 1080, MSI X99A SLI Plus, 5820k- 4.5GHz @ 1.25v, asetek based 360mm AIO, RM 1000x, 16GB memory, 750D with front USB 2.0 replaced with 3.0  ports, 2 250GB 850 EVOs in Raid 0 (why not, only has games on it), some hard drives

Screens- Acer preditor XB241H (1080p, 144Hz Gsync), LG 1080p ultrawide, (all mounted) directly wired to TV in other room

Stuff- k70 with reds, steel series rival, g13, full desk covering mouse mat

All parts black

Workstation(desk)- 3770k, 970 reference, 16GB of some crucial memory, a motherboard of some kind I don't remember, Micomsoft SC-512N1-L/DVI, CM Storm Trooper (It's got a handle, can you handle that?), 240mm Asetek based AIO, Crucial M550 256GB (upgrade soon), some hard drives, disc drives, and hot swap bays

Screens- 3  ASUS VN248H-P IPS 1080p screens mounted on a stand, some old tv on the wall above it. 

Stuff- Epicgear defiant (solderless swappable switches), g600, moutned mic and other stuff. 

Laptop docking area- 2 1440p korean monitors mounted, one AHVA matte, one samsung PLS gloss (very annoying, yes). Trashy Razer blackwidow chroma...I mean like the J key doesn't click anymore. I got a model M i use on it to, but its time for a new keyboard. Some edgy Utechsmart mouse similar to g600. Hooked to laptop dock for both of my dell precision laptops. (not only docking area)

Shelf- i7-2600 non-k (has vt-d), 380t, some ASUS sandy itx board, intel quad nic. Currently hosts shared files, setting up as pfsense box in VM. Also acts as spare gaming PC with a 580 or whatever someone brings. Hooked into laptop dock area via usb switch

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7 minutes ago, Syntaxvgm said:

God this shit. Already had my rant on this. 

 

I had considered posting this since it sort of qualifies as tech news, since it is about Congress forbidding the IRS from creating it's own online system, to the benefit of corporations.

 

@Glenwing would this exceed the forums guidelines? It's somewhat nationality limited, but still tech as far as I can tell. I'd say yes since the bill is bi-partisan authored and sponsored.


Computer's don't make errors. What they do, they do on purpose. By now your name and particulars have been fed into every laptop, desktop, mainframe and supermarket scanner that collectively make up the global information conspiracy, otherwise known as The Beast.

 

You just be careful. Computers have already beaten the Communists at chess. Next thing you know, they'll be beating humans.

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5 hours ago, ThePD said:

I believe he did something similar to the 'Green New Deal' because a significant amount of people who may have supported it were absent. So he called an immediate vote on it.

"THIS BILL IS THE MOST IMPORTANT THING LIKE EVER WE NEED TO SAVE OUR PLANET!!! IT'S SUPER POPULAR AND PEOPLE LOVE THIS THING WE NEED TO MAKE IT LAW LIKE YESTERDAY!!!!""

Okay fine let's vote on it.

*Fails completely*

Even if a few people did happen to be absent, how many people voted yes on that thing again? Pretty sure it was a bunch of "No" and a bunch of "I want to say No but my friends would be mad." Also what does it even do other than give complete power over everything to the federal government as a socialist authoritarian tyranny under the guise of making people feel good about stuff? yeah that's a no from me too, dawg.

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5 hours ago, mr moose said:

Sounds like dictatorship stuff to me

 

5 hours ago, mr moose said:

being able to dictate what bills/laws even have a chance to be heard is a dictatorship

You're being a bit hyperbolic don't you think? The "power" you're talking about is granted to the Senate Majority Leader under "scheduling legislative business". Remember, the creators of the US Constitution made it so the government would deliberately be inefficient, hence why any Constitutional amendments need approval by 3/4 of Congress and then need to be ratified by 3/4 of the states. It's set up so that one person or branch of government can't make quick unilateral changes. This keeps a lot of potentially shitty things from coming through the pipeline but can also make it so other things that most people would consider "good" not make it to the floor. It doesn't mean that the ideas of the bill in question will never make it back in a different bill, it just really draws out that process.

 

Here is the excerpt from senate.gov explaining the scheduling of legislative business in more detail:

Spoiler

Scheduling Legislative Business

Senate business includes legislative business (bills and resolutions) and executive business (nominations and treaties). (The Senate also sits as a court to try impeachments, for which a special, separate set of rules applies.) When introduced or received from the House or the president, legislative or executive business is normally referred to the committee with appropriate jurisdiction. Business is placed on the legislative or executive calendar, and becomes available for floor consideration, if the committee reports it.

 

The Senate accords its majority leader prime responsibility for scheduling. He may carry out this responsibility by moving that the Senate proceed to consider a particular matter. By precedent, he and the minority leader are recognized preferentially, and by custom only he (or his designee) makes motions or requests affecting when the Senate will meet and what it will consider.

 

For executive business, this motion to proceed may be offered in a nondebatable form, but for legislative business it usually is debatable. Whenever possible, therefore, the majority leader instead calls up bills and resolutions by unanimous consent. If senators object to unanimous consent to take up a measure, they are implicitly threatening to filibuster a motion to consider it. They may do so because they oppose that measure, or in the hope of influencing action on some other matter.

 

Senators can even place a "hold" on a measure or nomination, although this practice is not recognized in Senate rules. "Holds" are requests by senators to their party's floor leader to object on their behalf to any request to consider a matter, at least until they have been consulted. The majority leader will usually not even request consent to consider a measure if there is a hold on it.

 

Senate rules also permit a measure to be placed directly on the calendar when introduced or received from the House. This process permits senators to bypass referral to a committee they believe unsympathetic. Alternatively, if a committee fails to report a measure, a new measure with exactly the same provisions may be introduced and placed directly on the calendar.

 

Finally, Senate rules do not require that amendments be germane or relevant, except to general appropriation bills, budget measures, and matters under cloture (and a few other bills, pursuant to statutes). Consequently, if a committee fails to report a measure, a senator may offer its text as an amendment to any other measure under consideration, without regard to the scheduling preferences of the majority leader.

Here is also another excerpt from senate.gov explaining the roles of the majority and minority leader roles a bit more as well:

Spoiler

Elected at the beginning of each Congress by members of their respective party conferences to represent them on the Senate floor, the majority and minority leaders serve as spokesmen for their parties' positions on the issues. The majority leader has also come to speak for the Senate as an institution. Working with the committee chairs and ranking members, the majority leader schedules business on the floor by calling bills from the calendar and keeps members of his party advised about the daily legislative program. In consultation with the minority leader, the majority leader fashions unanimous consent agreements by which the Senate limits the amount of time for debate and divides that time between the parties. When time limits cannot be agreed on, the majority leader might file for cloture to shut off debate. Occupying the front desks on the center aisle, the two leaders coordinate party strategy and try to keep their parties united on roll-call votes.

The leaders spend much of their time on or near the Senate floor, to open the day's proceedings, keep legislation moving, and protect the rights and interests of party members. When several senators are seeking recognition at the same time, the presiding officer in the Senate will call on the majority leader first, then on the minority leader, and then on the managers of the bill being debated, in that order. This right of first recognition enables the majority leader to offer amendments, substitutes, and motions to reconsider before any other senator. Former Majority Leader Robert C. Byrd called first recognition "the most potent weapon in the Majority Leader's arsenal."

The posts of majority and minority leader are not included in the Constitution, as are the president of the Senate (the vice president of the United States) and the president pro tempore. Instead, party floor leadership evolved out of necessity. During the nineteenth century, floor leadership was exercised by the chair of the party conference and the chairs of the most powerful standing committees. In 1913, to help enact President Woodrow Wilson's ambitious legislative program, Democratic Conference chairman John Worth Kern of Indiana began functioning along the lines of the modern majority leader. In 1919, when Republicans returned to the majority, Republican Conference Chairman Henry Cabot Lodge, Sr. also acted as floor leader. Not until 1925 did Republicans officially designate Senator Charles Curtis of Kansas as majority leader, separate from the Conference chair. (Five years earlier, the Democrats had specifically named Oscar Underwood of Alabama as minority leader.)

Although party floor leadership posts carry great responsibility, they provide few specific powers. Instead, floor leaders have largely had to depend on their individual skill, intelligence, and personality. Majority leaders seek to balance the needs of senators of both parties to express their views fully on a bill with the pressures to move the bill as quickly as possible toward enactment. These conflicting demands have required majority leaders to develop skills in compromise, accommodation, and diplomacy. Lyndon Johnson, who held the post in the 1950s, once said that the greatest power of the majority leader was "the power of persuasion."

The majority leader usually works closely with the minority leader so that, as Senator Bob Dole explained, "we never surprise each other on the floor." The party leaders meet frequently with the president and with the leaders of the House of Representatives. The majority leader also greets foreign dignitaries visiting the Capitol.

Also just so you're aware the Speaker of the House in the House of Representatives holds the same power of scheduling legislative business and controls when or if a particular bill will be voted on. Since the Speaker of the House is currently Nancy Pelosi, who is a Democrat, this same stuff would happen if the Republican controlled Senate were to try and push through a bill she didn't like. So in conclusion this isn't something that "sounds like a dictatorship" as both houses of Congress have the same power and this helps with their checks and balances against each other most of the time.

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5 minutes ago, imreloadin said:

 

You're being a bit hyperbolic don't you think?

No.

5 minutes ago, imreloadin said:

The "power" you're talking about is granted to the Senate Majority Leader under "scheduling legislative business".

It doesn't matter who grants the power, if one person has the ability to prevent any or all legislation from being heard/voted on,  then that by definition is a dictatorship.  I don't care if that one politician represents the majority who will supposedly vote a specific way or not.

 

 


QuicK and DirtY. Read the CoC it's like a guide on how not to be moron.  Also I don't have an issue with the VS series.

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15 minutes ago, imreloadin said:

 

You're being a bit hyperbolic don't you think? The "power" you're talking about is granted to the Senate Majority Leader under "scheduling legislative business". Remember, the creators of the US Constitution made it so the government would deliberately be inefficient, hence why any Constitutional amendments need approval by 3/4 of Congress and then need to be ratified by 3/4 of the states. It's set up so that one person or branch of government can't make quick unilateral changes. This keeps a lot of potentially shitty things from coming through the pipeline but can also make it so other things that most people would consider "good" not make it to the floor. It doesn't mean that the ideas of the bill in question will never make it back in a different bill, it just really draws out that process.

 

Here is the excerpt from senate.gov explaining the scheduling of legislative business in more detail:

  Reveal hidden contents

Scheduling Legislative Business

Senate business includes legislative business (bills and resolutions) and executive business (nominations and treaties). (The Senate also sits as a court to try impeachments, for which a special, separate set of rules applies.) When introduced or received from the House or the president, legislative or executive business is normally referred to the committee with appropriate jurisdiction. Business is placed on the legislative or executive calendar, and becomes available for floor consideration, if the committee reports it.

 

The Senate accords its majority leader prime responsibility for scheduling. He may carry out this responsibility by moving that the Senate proceed to consider a particular matter. By precedent, he and the minority leader are recognized preferentially, and by custom only he (or his designee) makes motions or requests affecting when the Senate will meet and what it will consider.

 

For executive business, this motion to proceed may be offered in a nondebatable form, but for legislative business it usually is debatable. Whenever possible, therefore, the majority leader instead calls up bills and resolutions by unanimous consent. If senators object to unanimous consent to take up a measure, they are implicitly threatening to filibuster a motion to consider it. They may do so because they oppose that measure, or in the hope of influencing action on some other matter.

 

Senators can even place a "hold" on a measure or nomination, although this practice is not recognized in Senate rules. "Holds" are requests by senators to their party's floor leader to object on their behalf to any request to consider a matter, at least until they have been consulted. The majority leader will usually not even request consent to consider a measure if there is a hold on it.

 

Senate rules also permit a measure to be placed directly on the calendar when introduced or received from the House. This process permits senators to bypass referral to a committee they believe unsympathetic. Alternatively, if a committee fails to report a measure, a new measure with exactly the same provisions may be introduced and placed directly on the calendar.

 

Finally, Senate rules do not require that amendments be germane or relevant, except to general appropriation bills, budget measures, and matters under cloture (and a few other bills, pursuant to statutes). Consequently, if a committee fails to report a measure, a senator may offer its text as an amendment to any other measure under consideration, without regard to the scheduling preferences of the majority leader.

Here is also another excerpt from senate.gov explaining the roles of the majority and minority leader roles a bit more as well:

  Reveal hidden contents

Elected at the beginning of each Congress by members of their respective party conferences to represent them on the Senate floor, the majority and minority leaders serve as spokesmen for their parties' positions on the issues. The majority leader has also come to speak for the Senate as an institution. Working with the committee chairs and ranking members, the majority leader schedules business on the floor by calling bills from the calendar and keeps members of his party advised about the daily legislative program. In consultation with the minority leader, the majority leader fashions unanimous consent agreements by which the Senate limits the amount of time for debate and divides that time between the parties. When time limits cannot be agreed on, the majority leader might file for cloture to shut off debate. Occupying the front desks on the center aisle, the two leaders coordinate party strategy and try to keep their parties united on roll-call votes.

The leaders spend much of their time on or near the Senate floor, to open the day's proceedings, keep legislation moving, and protect the rights and interests of party members. When several senators are seeking recognition at the same time, the presiding officer in the Senate will call on the majority leader first, then on the minority leader, and then on the managers of the bill being debated, in that order. This right of first recognition enables the majority leader to offer amendments, substitutes, and motions to reconsider before any other senator. Former Majority Leader Robert C. Byrd called first recognition "the most potent weapon in the Majority Leader's arsenal."

The posts of majority and minority leader are not included in the Constitution, as are the president of the Senate (the vice president of the United States) and the president pro tempore. Instead, party floor leadership evolved out of necessity. During the nineteenth century, floor leadership was exercised by the chair of the party conference and the chairs of the most powerful standing committees. In 1913, to help enact President Woodrow Wilson's ambitious legislative program, Democratic Conference chairman John Worth Kern of Indiana began functioning along the lines of the modern majority leader. In 1919, when Republicans returned to the majority, Republican Conference Chairman Henry Cabot Lodge, Sr. also acted as floor leader. Not until 1925 did Republicans officially designate Senator Charles Curtis of Kansas as majority leader, separate from the Conference chair. (Five years earlier, the Democrats had specifically named Oscar Underwood of Alabama as minority leader.)

Although party floor leadership posts carry great responsibility, they provide few specific powers. Instead, floor leaders have largely had to depend on their individual skill, intelligence, and personality. Majority leaders seek to balance the needs of senators of both parties to express their views fully on a bill with the pressures to move the bill as quickly as possible toward enactment. These conflicting demands have required majority leaders to develop skills in compromise, accommodation, and diplomacy. Lyndon Johnson, who held the post in the 1950s, once said that the greatest power of the majority leader was "the power of persuasion."

The majority leader usually works closely with the minority leader so that, as Senator Bob Dole explained, "we never surprise each other on the floor." The party leaders meet frequently with the president and with the leaders of the House of Representatives. The majority leader also greets foreign dignitaries visiting the Capitol.

Also just so you're aware the Speaker of the House in the House of Representatives holds the same power of scheduling legislative business and controls when or if a particular bill will be voted on. Since the Speaker of the House is currently Nancy Pelosi, who is a Democrat, this same stuff would happen if the Republican controlled Senate were to try and push through a bill she didn't like. So in conclusion this isn't something that "sounds like a dictatorship" as both houses of Congress have the same power and this helps with their checks and balances against each other most of the time.

Just to argue, I'm fairly certain the Affordable Care Act, (obamacare) received less than 2/3rds of the vote in congress, and CERTAINLY didn't get ratified by 3/4ths of state legislature.

 

Yet, I still had to pay the "tax" (see: fine that somehow isn't a fine) for being too poor to afford health insurance, so that health insurance can allegedly be affordable. This "tax" ate all of my tax return, and even still I ended up having to sell some things to pay the federal government. Something I will never forget as long as I live.

 

Ahhh government. Complete and utter idiocy.

 

Taxation is theft.


Computer's don't make errors. What they do, they do on purpose. By now your name and particulars have been fed into every laptop, desktop, mainframe and supermarket scanner that collectively make up the global information conspiracy, otherwise known as The Beast.

 

You just be careful. Computers have already beaten the Communists at chess. Next thing you know, they'll be beating humans.

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6 minutes ago, Trik'Stari said:

Just to argue, I'm fairly certain the Affordable Care Act, (obamacare) received less than 2/3rds of the vote in congress, and CERTAINLY didn't get ratified by 3/4ths of state legislature.

 

Yet, I still had to pay the "tax" (see: fine that somehow isn't a fine) for being too poor to afford health insurance, so that health insurance can allegedly be affordable. This "tax" ate all of my tax return, and even still I ended up having to sell some things to pay the federal government. Something I will never forget as long as I live.

 

Ahhh government. Complete and utter idiocy.

 

Taxation is theft.

I said that Constitutional amendments require 2/3rds of the vote in Congress and ratification by 3/4 of states. The ACA was not a Constitutional amendment so therefore such stringent rules don't apply to it and it's simply a majority vote. I was using it as an example about how the US Government was deliberately designed to be inefficient.

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1 minute ago, imreloadin said:

I said that Constitutional amendments require 2/3rds of the vote in Congress and ratification by 3/4 of states. The ACA was not a Constitutional amendment so therefore such stringent rules don't apply to it and it's simply a majority vote. I was using it as an example about how the US Government was deliberately designed to be inefficient.

I was making the point (and could have been more clear) that a constitutional amendment is not the only way for congress to "Create law".

 

If the amendment process was the only way, we'd still be FAR better off as a nation than we are now lol


Computer's don't make errors. What they do, they do on purpose. By now your name and particulars have been fed into every laptop, desktop, mainframe and supermarket scanner that collectively make up the global information conspiracy, otherwise known as The Beast.

 

You just be careful. Computers have already beaten the Communists at chess. Next thing you know, they'll be beating humans.

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Just now, mr moose said:

I did read that, two people with the same power to void a vote or discussion doesn't make it any less dictatorial.

Many people would argue having the power to prevent a bill go through government as a total power.

Ok...I'll show myself out since you can't really have a discussion with people who just decide what words mean on their own...

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21 hours ago, mr moose said:

-snip-

I like how you underlined the "small group" portion but yet seem to completely dismiss the "absolute power" part...you know, the dictatory part...

Can you please tell me what you think "absolute power" means and then tell me how scheduling or not scheduling a bill to be voted on constitutes absolute power?

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Just now, imreloadin said:

I like how you underlined the "small group" portion but yet seem to completely dismiss the "absolute power" part...you know, the dictatory part...

Can you please tell me what you think "absolute power" means and then tell me how scheduling or not scheduling a bill to be voted on constitutes absolute power?

I already did:

 

4 minutes ago, mr moose said:

Being able to prevent the passage of legislation through government fits that description whether you like it or not.

 

 

In fact I did here as well:

10 minutes ago, mr moose said:

 

Many people would argue having the power to prevent a bill go through government as a total power.

 

 


QuicK and DirtY. Read the CoC it's like a guide on how not to be moron.  Also I don't have an issue with the VS series.

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Good ol mitch bodyblocking for Trump and the GOP as usual, surely this wont backfire when the other side eventually wins the senate and does the same shit for 4 years leading to a further deepening of partisan politics, oh wait


Delidded 3770k 4.4GHz | Sapphire Nitro+ Special Edition RX 580 1550MHz/2250MHz  | #2 FireStrike Extreme & #2 Superposition 1080p Xtreme | 32GB DDR3 1600MHz

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Posted · Original PosterOP
35 minutes ago, Trik'Stari said:

Just to argue, I'm fairly certain the Affordable Care Act, (obamacare) received less than 2/3rds of the vote in congress, and CERTAINLY didn't get ratified by 3/4ths of state legislature.

 

Yet, I still had to pay the "tax" (see: fine that somehow isn't a fine) for being too poor to afford health insurance, so that health insurance can allegedly be affordable. This "tax" ate all of my tax return, and even still I ended up having to sell some things to pay the federal government. Something I will never forget as long as I live.

 

Ahhh government. Complete and utter idiocy.

 

Taxation is theft.

Not to mention the it was passed as a fine, and CHANGED by the supreme court to be a tax to make it legal. Because that's their job, to write the law. Kennedy was the deciding vote really, and he was considered on the conservative side. The entire process, from inception to supreme court, was a disgrace to our country and the way in which we make laws.  


muh specs 

Gaming and HTPC (reparations)- ASUS 1080, MSI X99A SLI Plus, 5820k- 4.5GHz @ 1.25v, asetek based 360mm AIO, RM 1000x, 16GB memory, 750D with front USB 2.0 replaced with 3.0  ports, 2 250GB 850 EVOs in Raid 0 (why not, only has games on it), some hard drives

Screens- Acer preditor XB241H (1080p, 144Hz Gsync), LG 1080p ultrawide, (all mounted) directly wired to TV in other room

Stuff- k70 with reds, steel series rival, g13, full desk covering mouse mat

All parts black

Workstation(desk)- 3770k, 970 reference, 16GB of some crucial memory, a motherboard of some kind I don't remember, Micomsoft SC-512N1-L/DVI, CM Storm Trooper (It's got a handle, can you handle that?), 240mm Asetek based AIO, Crucial M550 256GB (upgrade soon), some hard drives, disc drives, and hot swap bays

Screens- 3  ASUS VN248H-P IPS 1080p screens mounted on a stand, some old tv on the wall above it. 

Stuff- Epicgear defiant (solderless swappable switches), g600, moutned mic and other stuff. 

Laptop docking area- 2 1440p korean monitors mounted, one AHVA matte, one samsung PLS gloss (very annoying, yes). Trashy Razer blackwidow chroma...I mean like the J key doesn't click anymore. I got a model M i use on it to, but its time for a new keyboard. Some edgy Utechsmart mouse similar to g600. Hooked to laptop dock for both of my dell precision laptops. (not only docking area)

Shelf- i7-2600 non-k (has vt-d), 380t, some ASUS sandy itx board, intel quad nic. Currently hosts shared files, setting up as pfsense box in VM. Also acts as spare gaming PC with a 580 or whatever someone brings. Hooked into laptop dock area via usb switch

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24 minutes ago, S w a t s o n said:

Good ol mitch bodyblocking for Trump and the GOP as usual, surely this wont backfire when the other side eventually wins the senate and does the same shit for 4 years leading to a further deepening of partisan politics, oh wait

Considering how much our "democracy" functions like a pendulum, I seriously fear what will happen when things swing back the other way.

 

Unless the people step in and elect only non-party based candidates for the entirety of the next election, things will get seriously bad.


Computer's don't make errors. What they do, they do on purpose. By now your name and particulars have been fed into every laptop, desktop, mainframe and supermarket scanner that collectively make up the global information conspiracy, otherwise known as The Beast.

 

You just be careful. Computers have already beaten the Communists at chess. Next thing you know, they'll be beating humans.

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5 hours ago, imreloadin said:

I like how you underlined the "small group" portion but yet seem to completely dismiss the "absolute power" part...you know, the dictatory part...

Can you please tell me what you think "absolute power" means and then tell me how scheduling or not scheduling a bill to be voted on constitutes absolute power?

It's irrelevant if there's one or two people with the same power, but if that power is single handedly deciding that some legistation will never be heard in congress because that person has the power to not schedule it and if by some miracle it gets there, that same person can suddenly choose to vote about it without any prior notice when that person sees that the supporters of that bill are absent. That is quite fucked up power to someone have in "democracy".

 

Apparently USA isn't the perfect democracy as seen in the past now that the president has powers to walk over everything as Trumpeteer has shown and when there's two persons in high ups who can stop any legistation from moving forward just because they feel like it. Like, yes president of Finland can stop legistation from going through by not signing it which will return the legistation to the Finnish Parliament for discussions and for a new vote, but if that legistation is voted by the parliament and comes to the desk of the president without any (or with only very minor) changes, the president can no longer decline signing and must pass the legistation.

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12 hours ago, Taf the Ghost said:

There's no common ground because there isn't any common ground. The Dems are under the complete control of Wall Street-Silicon Valley axis, which is what is causing a lot of the civil war among Dem factions. The GOP has its own massive factional war going on as well. After both of those get settled, then the real domestic political warfare gets started. 

 

Civil War 2.0 isn't completely locked in, but we're rapidly approaching the point.

I wish the correct outcome would happen here, both parties split into two and we end up with 4 major parties instead of just 2.


Computer's don't make errors. What they do, they do on purpose. By now your name and particulars have been fed into every laptop, desktop, mainframe and supermarket scanner that collectively make up the global information conspiracy, otherwise known as The Beast.

 

You just be careful. Computers have already beaten the Communists at chess. Next thing you know, they'll be beating humans.

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14 hours ago, Unclescar said:

"THIS BILL IS THE MOST IMPORTANT THING LIKE EVER WE NEED TO SAVE OUR PLANET!!! IT'S SUPER POPULAR AND PEOPLE LOVE THIS THING WE NEED TO MAKE IT LAW LIKE YESTERDAY!!!!""

Okay fine let's vote on it.

*Fails completely*

Even if a few people did happen to be absent, how many people voted yes on that thing again? Pretty sure it was a bunch of "No" and a bunch of "I want to say No but my friends would be mad." Also what does it even do other than give complete power over everything to the federal government as a socialist authoritarian tyranny under the guise of making people feel good about stuff? yeah that's a no from me too, dawg.

I was just making a point. The Green new deal was a joke from the start. It got 0 votes which was hilarious.

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Trump says he's gonna veto the bill (even though vetoing goes against the people's will.)

 

Hi welcome to America, where a businessman is our president and corporations run our politics.


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On 4/17/2017 at 5:36 PM, Ryan_Vickers said:

Rawr9 Furry Sex

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well made it 1.5 pages before some injected non-topic subject matter.

keep it on the topic.. wandering will close this quickly..

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On 4/11/2019 at 4:12 AM, Thaldor said:

Apparently USA isn't the perfect democracy

That's because we're not a democracy.  We are a representative republic, which is by design.

 

As for the OP, I'd have to read the bill, but I'm hesitant to trust anything coming from the current HoR half of Congress (then again, I don't entirely trust the Senate side, either).  It's possible it was blocked because it was just a bad bill.  I notice that absolutely no one in this thread has even mentioned what's in the bill, just that it's supposed to be for "net neutrality" (whatever that's even meant to infer).  Has anyone who's angry at McConnell even looked at the bill?  I know I plan to once I go on my lunch break.

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