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Aero10

Heating Issues with the stock cooler!!

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Posted · Original PosterOP

Hey Guys,

I just assembled my new PC with the processor Ryzen 3600. To manage my processor I installed Ryzen Master and then I noticed that the temperature of the processor on normal usage [Chrome, YouTube (720p)and watching offline videos (1080p/720p)] the  temperature of the processor crossed 60°C without playing any games!!

Andif I open the iCUE for customising my Corsair keyboard the temperature crosses 87°C. 

As the stock cooler that comes with AMD procesor has thermal paste pre-applied I didn't bother to buy any seperately.

What should I do to improve this situation!!

Can anyone help me out on this please!!!

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was the cooler mounted properly? or is PBO enabled?


Im with the mentaility of "IF IM NOT SURE IF ITS ENOUGH COOLING, GO OVERKILL"

 

PS: i cooled a Ryzen 5 3600(65W) with ID cooling SE207 (200W-250W tdp lol)

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1 hour ago, VioDuskar said:

or get a good AIO 

He doesn't need to go that far!


CPU:i7 9700k 4.9Ghz All Cores Mobo: MSI MPG Z390 Gaming Edge AC, RAM:Corsair Vengeance LPX 16GB 3200MHz DDR4 OC 3500Mhz GPU:MSI RTX 2070 ARMOR 8GB OC Storage:Samsung SSD 970 EVO NVMe M.2 250GB, 2x SSD ADATA PRO SP900 256GB, SSD mushkin chronos 120GB, HDD WD CB 2TB, HDD GREEN 2TB PSU:Corsair CS 650 M Gold Display(s): 1st: LG 27UK600-W, 4K, IPS, HDR10, 10bit(8bit + A-FRC). 2nd: Samsung P2470HD 3rd: Samsung SyncMaster 24", Cooling:Fazn CPU Cooler Aero 120T Push/pull Keyboard: Corsair K95 Platinum RGB mx Rapidfire Mouse:Razer Naga Mouse 2014 Headset: Razer Kraken 7.1 Chroma Sound: Logitech X-540 5.1 Surround Sound Speaker Case: Modded Case Inverted, 5 intake 120mm, one exhaust 120mm.

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Posted · Original PosterOP
On 2/17/2019 at 1:07 AM, LukeSavenije said:

Credit to: @GoldenLag @TVwazhere @WoodenMarker @Stefan Payne @seon123 @fasauceome @Twilight @valdyrgramr @Jurrunio @AluminiumTech

 

This thread is meant to guide you through your build of choice, on a per part basis. we'll include some samples for reference.

 

To start, we recommend PCPartPicker to make the whole list together, where you can also see prices from selected retailers

 

Step 0: Guidelines

  Hide contents

make sure when you make a topic about this or ask a question here, it meets the guidelines

 

Step 1: CPU

  Reveal hidden contents

Tier F not recommended

Tier D daily use, not recommended for gaming

Tier C daily use and casual gaming

Tier B midrange gaming

Tier A high end gaming, light CAD

Tier S high end gaming, heavier CAD

 

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1MwVccMfh2ZhBMonsNFyAdI42B4dGDpROhIN5Bgniziw/edit?usp=drivesdk

 

Step 2: CPU Cooling

  Reveal hidden contents

 

Step 3: Motherboard

  Reveal hidden contents

Intel:

Tier D+: Basic pc, up to locked i5

Tier C+: low-end gaming: up to unlocked i5/locked i7

Tier B+: midrange gaming: up to unlocked i7

Tier A+: High-end gaming: up to unlocked i9

Tier S: Heavy overclocking: up to unlocked i9

Tier W: Workstation use: up to unlocked i9

 

AMD: check description

 

Step 4: Memory

  Reveal hidden contents

to be added

 

Step 5: Storage (SSD)

  Reveal hidden contents

@wpirobotbuilder did an article on storage, with ssd's included. It's older information, but still containts very important parts of the modern market

 

Step 6: Storage (HDD)

  Reveal hidden contents

@Blade of Grass did an article explaining the difference between HDD's from companies 

 

Step 7: Video Card

  Reveal hidden contents

Tier D+: Only if others don't fit/big sale, known to have bad cooling, be loud and/or have other problems

Tier C+: Value build, can be louder

Tier B+: High end build: best cards value to performance-wise, are great overclockers

Tier A: Best of the line cards, including hardcore overclocking cards like the Lightning, HOF and K|ngp|n

 

Step 8: Case

  Reveal hidden contents

Tier 1 - Best airflow, Good/Great Build Quality, Ease Of Use (Cable management, installation, etc). Suitable for any level of hardware

Fractal Design Meshify C, Meshify S2

Phanteks Enthoo Pro M TG

Silverstone RL06

Coolermaster H500, H500p Mesh, H500M

Lian Li PC-O11 Air (beware restrictive dust filter)

 

Tier 2 - Good but not best in class airflow, Good/Great Build Quality, Ease of Use. Suitable for high end CPU's and high end Single Open Air GPU such as an i7/i9/R7 and a Vega64/1080ti/2080ti

Fractal Design Define S/Define R6/Define C

NZXT H700 (i version for NZXT fan hub and RGB lighting)

Corsair 460x/500D/570x

Thermaltake View 71

Phanteks Evolv X

Lian Li PC-O11D

Cooler Master Master Case Pro 5, MC500

 

Tier 3 - Good/Great airflow on a budget. (<$60usd) Might sacrifice some features like build quality, TG, RGB

Fractal Design Focus G

Phanteks P350x, P300

Cougar MX330

Cooler Master Master Box 5, K500, MB500, MB510L, MB511, MB511 RGB, q300l, q500l

Rosewill Spectra C100

Thermaltake Versa J22 Tempered Glass

 

Step 9: Power supply

  Reveal hidden contents

Tier A+ are all the PSUs that have overcurrent protection, undervoltage protection and every other protection you'd want, they have multirail on the 700w+ units, and are a great choice to pick with a higher end rig

 

Tier A - These PSUs are good units at a fair value, fall short against the higher tiers, but still perform great for most people.

 

Tier B - These PSUs are mid-range, they're not the greatest PSUs on the market but they're definitely not bad. They're usually good quality, and are good alternatives if prices are too high on a higher tier unit. Some units might have shorter lasting sleeve fans.

 

Tier C - These units fall short on some parts (regulation, fan, protection performance, other problems), but are good enough for basic use and a expectation to not last much longer than warranty goes

 

Tier D - These units fall short with heavy protection problems, have very poor regulation, are outdated or are literally firestarters. we don't recommend to buy them for ANY use

 

 

Step 10: Operating System

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You have 3 choices for operating systems. This includes: MacOS, Linux and Windows. They all have their pro's and con's and why they may or may not be up to the task for you.

 

MacOS:

+ polished, runs commercial software (MS Office/Adobe software), different desktop layout, integrates well with apple devices, software included (Pages, iMovie, etc), great gesture control, long support, fast patching, UNIX based, backed by apple, private

 

- resource heavy, no Proton, Wine is very limited, so gaming or other windows applications run poorly, a lot of addicional software is expensive, different desktop layout, only works officially with apple devices, closed source, hard to install on anything outside Apple

 

Linux:

+ free, many types, works well with Proton and Wine, a lot of them have free software included and have many other free alternatives, open source, Long-term and short term releases, customizable, have systems that look like Windows or MacOS, works on a lot of recent and older hardware, can be less resource heavy than MacOS or windows, great community support

 

- not always backed by a company, learning curve, not always stable, not all commercial software can be ran natively, bad gesture control, some games don't support Linux

 

Windows:

+ runs most commercial software, runs most games natively, widest used, backed by big company

 

- paid, not good with privacy, doesn't come with much software included, closed source, big target, not that stable, resource heavy

 

Step 10.1: Linux

  Reveal hidden contents

Distro's:

 

Manjaro: based on Arch

+ rolling release, GUI, 4 official and 7 community UI's (different installers)

- not that stable
Package Manager: pacman

 

Pop! OS: based on Ubuntu

+ GUI, many guides to find

- not that stable, only one UI, can break when removing certain parts

Package Manager: apt

 

Pop! OS LTS: based on Ubuntu

+ very stable, GUI, many guides to find

- gets updated every 6 months, only one UI, can break when removing certain parts, has problems with gaming

Package Manager: apt

 

Ubuntu: based on Debian

+ GUI, many guides to find, 10 UI's, owned by Canonical

- not that stable, some tools aren't updated

Package Manager: apt

 

Ubuntu LTS: based on Debian

+ very stable, GUI, many guides to find, 10 Ui's, owned by Canonical

- gets updated every 6 months, only one UI, some tools aren't updated, has problems with gaming

Package Manager: apt

 

Ubuntu Server: based on Debian

+ very stable, server features, owned by Canonical

- gets updated every 6 months, no GUI (can be added), some tools aren't updated

Package Manager: apt

 

Linux mint: based on Ubuntu LTS

+ GUI, many guides to find, good community forum

- had a major bug, has problems with gaming, gets updated every 6 months

Package Manager: apt

 

Fedora: based on RedHat

+ GUI, very stable

- lacks tools for video playback, has problems with gaming, gets updated every 6 months

Package manager: dnf/rpm

 

Redhat: based on RedHat

+ GUI, very stable, server features, owned by IBM

- paid, has problems with gaming

Package manager: dnf/rpm

 

Solus: based on project Solus

+ good steam integration, UI, stable rolling release

- not as many apps as bigger distro's, only 3 UI's

Package manager: eopkg

 

UI's:

 

Gnome 3:

+ stable, familiar for MacOS users

- heavy on resources

 

Cinnamon:

+ stable, familiar to Windows users

- heavy on resources

 

XFCE:

+ stable, can be customized to look like windows or macos, light on resources

- not as modern looking

 

KDE:

+ stable, familiar to windows users, can be customized to look like macos

- heavy on resources

 

Architect:

+ barebones, fully customisable, stable

- doesn't come with anything except a tui, manjaro only

 

Mate:

+ stable, light on resources, can be customized to look like windows or macos

- not as modern looking

 

Budgie:

+ stable, familiar for MacOS users, can be customised to resemble Windows GUI

- heavy on resources

 

more info on setup, enabling/fixing things in Linux and much more:

 

Step 10.2: Windows

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to be added

 

Step 10.3: MacOS:

  Reveal hidden contents

While it's technically possible to run MacOS on these PCs, compatibility is hard to set on the forehand, so we won't touch far on it

 

Step 11: Monitor

  Reveal hidden contents

to be added (we need help here)

 

Step 12: Extra fans, thermal compound, fan controllers

  Reveal hidden contents

to be added

 

Step 13: Networking

  Reveal hidden contents

to be added

 

Step 14: Sound

  Reveal hidden contents

@h264 answered a lot of the commonly asked questions about audio here

 

 

Step 15: Peripherals

  Reveal hidden contents

to be added

 

Step 16: reference builds

  Reveal hidden contents

to be added

 

Picture as banner

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20190222_163424-01.thumb.jpeg.990be6bbf614041e7811a29ac4f9d3b0.jpeg

by @seoz

 

 

16 hours ago, Vejnemojnen said:

A decent 25-30Eur air cooler will take care of it just fine. What is yout location @Aero10 ?

Well I live in India so I'd have to look for a cooler that's good around here!

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Posted · Original PosterOP
18 hours ago, Martin2132 said:

was the cooler mounted properly? or is PBO enabled?

No I haven't enabled the PBO yet.

This would probably be the 3rd boot!

I haven't done any major changes yet.

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Posted · Original PosterOP
18 hours ago, flashiling said:

i didn't use my amd stock cooler.

i got the Cryorig H7

But that would void the warranty!

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Posted · Original PosterOP
18 hours ago, VioDuskar said:

buy some good paste, or get a good AIO 

Well I'm considering it now...!😩

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16 hours ago, Aero10 said:

But that would void the warranty!

wait, does using aftermarket cooker void warranty?


Im with the mentaility of "IF IM NOT SURE IF ITS ENOUGH COOLING, GO OVERKILL"

 

PS: i cooled a Ryzen 5 3600(65W) with ID cooling SE207 (200W-250W tdp lol)

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10 hours ago, Aero10 said:

No I haven't enabled the PBO yet.

This would probably be the 3rd boot!

I haven't done any major changes yet.

The stock cooler is pretty rubbish. Higher temps at idle don't really matter but keep an eye on it under load. Get something nicer and you're done. Given it's running warm already, don't enable PBO until you upgrade the cooling as it will only make it worse.


Main rig: Asus Maximus VIII Hero, i7-6700k stock, Noctua D14, G.Skill Ripjaws V 3200 2x8GB, Gigabyte GTX 1650, Corsair HX750i, In Win 303 NVIDIA, Samsung SM951 512GB, WD Blue 1TB, HP LP2475W 1200p wide gamut

Gaming system: Asrock Z370 Pro4, i7-8086k stock, Noctua D15, Corsair Vengeance LPX RGB 3000 2x8GB, Gigabyte RTX 2070, Fractal Edison 550W PSU, Corsair 600C, Optane 900p 280GB, Crucial MX200 1TB, Sandisk 960GB, Acer Predator XB241YU 1440p 144Hz G-sync

Ryzen rig: Asrock B450 ITX, R5 3600, Noctua D9L, Corsair Vengeance LPX RGB 3000 2x4GB, EVGA GTX 970, Corsair CX450M, NZXT Manta, Crucial MX300 525GB, Acer RT280K

VR rig: Asus Z170I Pro Gaming, i7-6600k stock, Silverstone TD03-E, Kingston Hyper-X 2666 2x8GB, Zotac 1070 FE, Corsair CX450M, Silverstone SG13, Samsung PM951 256GB, HTC Vive

Gaming laptop: Asus FX503VD, i5-7300HQ, 2x8GB DDR4, GTX 1050, Sandisk 256GB SSD

Total CPU heating: i7-7800X, i7-5930k, i7-5820k, 2x i7-6700k, i7-6700T, i5-6600k, i7-5775C, i5-5675C, i5-4570S, i3-8350k, i3-6100, i3-4360, i3-4150T, E5-2683v3, 2x E5-2650, E5-2667, R7 3700X, R5 3600

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Posted · Original PosterOP
48 minutes ago, flashiling said:

no?

why would it??

i could be wrong but it seems super illogical to me 

I read it somewhere, it does!!!

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On 11/15/2019 at 5:24 AM, Aero10 said:

I read it somewhere, it does!!!

Please link the source that says this. 

 

Make sure the cooler is fully and evenly tightened. Have you tried reseating the cooler?

 

FYI, you can multiquote instead of making multiple posts.


If you ever need help with a build, read the following before posting: http://linustechtips.com/main/topic/3061-build-plan-thread-recommendations-please-read-before-posting/
Also, make sure to quote a post or tag a member when replying or else they won't get a notification that you replied to them.

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I was curious what stock temps would be with my new 3600 so I gave the stock cooler a shot while I waited for my AM4 adapter to arrive. I did clean the thermal paste off and applied some NT-H1 I had sitting around from about a year ago.

 

Idle my temps sat around 40C with the fan curve I had set. 100pct fan I was sitting at  76-77C running kombuster cpu burner. No OC running, just stock settings.

 

I'd recommend new thermal paste. Also, how's your case ventilation? That could also be the culprit.

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