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Mortenrb

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  1. Agree
    Mortenrb got a reaction from Spoiled_Kitten in What to do with Adruino starter kit   
    There's lots you could do! It all depends on the kit you got, and what you envision to do with it, the sky is the limit!
     
    Arduino is great for prototyping nearly everything, and something as complex as a robot cleaner/vacuum could be simple-ish to do with an arduino.
     
    May I suggest for you to head over to Arduino Project Hub, it's a great location for inspiration!
    https://create.arduino.cc/projecthub
  2. Like
    Mortenrb got a reaction from Bombastinator in What to do with Adruino starter kit   
    There's lots you could do! It all depends on the kit you got, and what you envision to do with it, the sky is the limit!
     
    Arduino is great for prototyping nearly everything, and something as complex as a robot cleaner/vacuum could be simple-ish to do with an arduino.
     
    May I suggest for you to head over to Arduino Project Hub, it's a great location for inspiration!
    https://create.arduino.cc/projecthub
  3. Like
    Mortenrb got a reaction from Exaco in Technical/Server stuff aside is Linux worth it? ( Kinda roasting Linux )   
    I have to, partly, disagree.
    An average user wouldn't note much difference using Mac OS, Windows nor Linux, as all they will use is the office package and internet browser.. and if those are easily available, that's basically all there is to it.
    If a computer comes pre-installed with Linux, the average user would just login and start browsing the web without diving any further.
     
    The issue is if you wish to to other stuff with it, such as gaming, video/photo editing or mostly everything "above average" computer stuff on your PC, and don't like hacking around your system. Plus, not all industry-standard tools are available in Linux.
    If you, however, are tech savvy and actually spend some time with Linux, you'll eventually figure out that a lot of stuff is easier or more convenient to do in Linux.
     
    E.g. as a developer, I find Linux tools a lot more powerful and a lot easier to work with, than competing tools on Mac OS and Windows.
    However, if it's your first time developing something, then it might be an easier route to start out with Mac OS and Windows.
  4. Like
    Mortenrb reacted to BobVonBob in Shotcut vs VSDC? Is Shotcut really that much better?   
    Instead of picking an editing software to stick with before using them, I would instead recommend trying out many different editors, Shotcut, VSDC, Lightworks, DaVinci Resolve, etc. Try editing a short video on each, if in the process you find something you don't like or something you can't do easily then you can rule that one out. It's a much more laborious process, but you'll end up with an editor that's a better fit for how you work than by trusting the opinions of other people.
  5. Like
    Mortenrb reacted to AdkatkaShow in Interesting fact about Linux Kernel   
    Not everyone know that, but amount of penguins reflect the amount of available cpu thread.
    8 Thread cpu = 8 Penguins
    7 Thread cpu = 7 Penguins
     

  6. Like
    Mortenrb got a reaction from Dutch_Master in Technical/Server stuff aside is Linux worth it? ( Kinda roasting Linux )   
    I have to, partly, disagree.
    An average user wouldn't note much difference using Mac OS, Windows nor Linux, as all they will use is the office package and internet browser.. and if those are easily available, that's basically all there is to it.
    If a computer comes pre-installed with Linux, the average user would just login and start browsing the web without diving any further.
     
    The issue is if you wish to to other stuff with it, such as gaming, video/photo editing or mostly everything "above average" computer stuff on your PC, and don't like hacking around your system. Plus, not all industry-standard tools are available in Linux.
    If you, however, are tech savvy and actually spend some time with Linux, you'll eventually figure out that a lot of stuff is easier or more convenient to do in Linux.
     
    E.g. as a developer, I find Linux tools a lot more powerful and a lot easier to work with, than competing tools on Mac OS and Windows.
    However, if it's your first time developing something, then it might be an easier route to start out with Mac OS and Windows.
  7. Like
    Mortenrb got a reaction from Exaco in Technical/Server stuff aside is Linux worth it? ( Kinda roasting Linux )   
    To answer you title; it depends.
    For the majority of people, Linux just isn't worth it, just yet.
     
    I prefer Linux over Windows and Mac OS for many tasks, but I also enjoy spending time to solve challenges I might get when doing stupid s**t I never should've.
    But again, most people just want to open the laptop/tablet/desktop/phone and start using it, and while distrobutions might be at that stage right now, it still requires the user to actually install it, which is a barrier most people won't pass.
     
    In the future, more computers might come pre-installed with some distrobution that just works out of the box, and that might be the actual rise of Linux on the desktop.
     
    About all the stuff you listed, well, enough people already answered why those statements/issues are false or misleading, so I won't bother with it.
  8. Like
    Mortenrb got a reaction from Dutch_Master in Technical/Server stuff aside is Linux worth it? ( Kinda roasting Linux )   
    To answer you title; it depends.
    For the majority of people, Linux just isn't worth it, just yet.
     
    I prefer Linux over Windows and Mac OS for many tasks, but I also enjoy spending time to solve challenges I might get when doing stupid s**t I never should've.
    But again, most people just want to open the laptop/tablet/desktop/phone and start using it, and while distrobutions might be at that stage right now, it still requires the user to actually install it, which is a barrier most people won't pass.
     
    In the future, more computers might come pre-installed with some distrobution that just works out of the box, and that might be the actual rise of Linux on the desktop.
     
    About all the stuff you listed, well, enough people already answered why those statements/issues are false or misleading, so I won't bother with it.
  9. Like
    Mortenrb got a reaction from The curious James in Handy Keyboard shortcuts for Internet browsers   
    You missed the most important part:
    Chrome:
    CTRL+SHITFT+N = 😏
     
    Firefox:
    CTRL+SHIFT+P = 😏
  10. Informative
    Mortenrb reacted to homeap5 in Friend used regedit and i cant fix it   
    You can download (using another computer) bootable registry editor and revert changes (by editing key described by @Mortenrb).
     
    https://www.raymond.cc/blog/how-to-edit-windows-registry-key-values-without-booting-in-windows/
  11. Informative
    Mortenrb got a reaction from HanZie82 in Friend used regedit and i cant fix it   
    Well, there's a few things I can think of, and these are those I know of:
    If you're somehow able to move a .reg file to your computer (via a friends computer, maybe?) with the contents:
     
    Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00 [HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\exefile\shell\open\command] @="\"%1\" %*" "IsolatedCommand"="\"%1\" %*" and then double-click it.
    This should, hopefully, make exe files run with the correct parametres.
     
    Other than that, you might want to try to get a memory stick with Windows 10 and try to repair it from there.
     
    There's always the last method, and that's to copy the registry from C:\Windows\System32\Config (I believe it should either be software or system), this can be opened and edited on a different Windows machine and placed back on the currently not working machine. I have a vage memory of doing this to fix a W2k PC at work some years ago, but I am unsure if the solution worked as I wanted.
  12. Informative
    Mortenrb got a reaction from JonasEikeland in Automatic dumping station   
    If you're inexperienced with software development, I'd suggeset to start off with a simple programming language.
    Since you're relying on a rpi, I'd suggest going for Python.

    What you'd have to do, is basically loop through the disks, detect new drives (not sure if you could attach it to a system event for when new drive is connected, to drop the loop?) , go to a clone/copy function, format, then possibly use the rpi GPIO to display a LED for "done".
     
    Luckily for us, the internet is overflowing with helpful articles
    Detecting new USB devices
    https://stackoverflow.com/questions/47495206/how-to-detect-a-new-usb-device-is-connected-on-python
     
    Python copy:
    https://docs.python.org/3/library/copy.html
    https://stackoverflow.com/questions/123198/how-do-i-copy-a-file-in-python
     
    Python format drive
    https://stackoverflow.com/questions/27568706/format-drive-in-python
     
    Raspberry pi/Python GPIO
    https://thepihut.com/blogs/raspberry-pi-tutorials/27968772-turning-on-an-led-with-your-raspberry-pis-gpio-pins
     
    Not sure if all of these articles are completely up-to-date and working with RPI/Linux, but it should give you an general idea for the path you should take
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