Jump to content
Phishing Emails & YouTube Messages - Fake Giveaway Read more... ×
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
EnterClassroom

Nvme vs sata ssd

Recommended Posts

Posted · Original PosterOP

I never use SSD before,so now i will buy new ssd which one have the best for me? Im using this ssd for windows boot,ms.word,powerpoint,and open other programs, in my country both ssd have similar price and same warranty

1.samsung 860 evo 500gb

2.adata sx8200 pro 512gb

Is it real nvme runs hotter than sata ssd?

My motherboard is asus x470-f strix

Thankyou in advance and sorry for my bad english

Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, EnterClassroom said:

2.adata sx8200 pro 512gb

Nvme all the way!!

its not hot under normal circumstance, / load.

even if you make it hot to be slowed down, it shall still be faster than sata ssd, 4x vs 1x  

Link to post
Share on other sites

There will be 0 improvement to boot times, word, powerpoint, or anything like that.

The only difference is that you will get half the capacity of a sata SSD for the same price.

It is a bad idea to buy nvme unless the programs you use specifically can use those higher speeds.

Programs like video editors, data analysis, and other high datarate tasks.

 

14 minutes ago, dgsddfgdfhgs said:

Nvme all the way!!

its not hot under normal circumstance, / load.

even if you make it hot to be slowed down, it shall still be faster than sata ssd, 4x vs 1x  

23 minutes ago, AlexTheGreatish said:

M.2 can have performance decrease due to heat, but even then it will still be faster than a SATA drive.  Basically if you can afford the NVME drive then get that one, it's waaaay faster than sata.

 

Just because the numbers are higher in a benchmark does not mean that you should waste money on performance you cannot use.

 


My sound system costs more than my PC.        Check out my S340 build log "White Heaven"        The "LIGHTCANON" flashlight build log        Project AntiRoll (prototype)        Custom speaker project

Spoiler

Intel i7 4790k | ASUS GTX770 | ASUS Sabertooth Z97 Mark S | Corsair Vengeance Pro 32GB | NZXT S340 | Seasonic Platinum 760 | modded H100i | Ducky ONE White TKL RGB | Logitech MX Master 2S | 2x Samsung 850 Pro 512GB | WD Red 4TB Samsung 58" 4k TV | 2x Behringer NEKKST K8 | BIC Acoustech H-100II | Scarlett 2i4 | 2x AT2020

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Enderman said:

you should waste money on performance you cannot use.

OP have stated they have similar price.

even so, m.2 is sooo light (8g) and cableless, and admit that the heatsink looks good lol 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Enderman said:

There will be 0 improvement to boot times, word, powerpoint, or anything like that.

The only difference is that you will get half the capacity of a sata SSD for the same price.

It is a bad idea to buy nvme unless the programs you use specifically can use those higher speeds.

Programs like video editors, data analysis, and other high datarate tasks.

 

 

Just because the numbers are higher in a benchmark does not mean that you should waste money on performance you cannot use.

I mostly agree with you on the real-world performance. However, NVMe drives have been getting cheaper, to the point where you can often get an Intel 660p cheaper than SATA mainstays like the Crucial MX500 and Samsung 860 Evo.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted · Original PosterOP
14 minutes ago, Sakkura said:

I mostly agree with you on the real-world performance. However, NVMe drives have been getting cheaper, to the point where you can often get an Intel 660p cheaper than SATA mainstays like the Crucial MX500 and Samsung 860 Evo.

Is it true nvme get more higher temps??

Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted · Original PosterOP
26 minutes ago, Enderman said:

There will be 0 improvement to boot times, word, powerpoint, or anything like that.

The only difference is that you will get half the capacity of a sata SSD for the same price.

It is a bad idea to buy nvme unless the programs you use specifically can use those higher speeds.

Programs like video editors, data analysis, and other high datarate tasks.

 

 

Just because the numbers are higher in a benchmark does not mean that you should waste money on performance you cannot use.

 

How about the tempa for nvme and sata ssd? Is it true nvme more hotter than sata?

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Sakkura said:

 to the point where you can often get an Intel 660p cheaper than SATA mainstays

As Intel rep at my location, nothing makes me happier than having this drive as an alternative to the 860 evo. When someone comes in with a relatively recent system looking for a cheap ssd and inevitably walks straight to the Samsung displayer because marketing.gif, it always blows their mind that, yes, I actually can get you a drive that's up to three times as fast for less money. 1tb 860 evo is $147.99 and the 660p is $134.99 lol


CPU: 9900k @ 5.35ghz Motherboard: Z390 Aorus Xtreme GPU: EVGA 2080ti FTW3 + HYDROCOPPER @ 2190Mhz RAM: 16GB Vengeance RGB 3600CL17 PSU: 850P2

COOLING: Bent Glass Loop CASE: 900D

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, EnterClassroom said:

Is it true nvme get more higher temps??

To some extent yes, but it's not a problem. If the controller gets hot it will just run a little slower, but it will still be faster than a SATA SSD. And if the flash memory gets hot, that is actually beneficial for data retention.

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, EnterClassroom said:

How about the tempa for nvme and sata ssd? Is it true nvme more hotter than sata?

Yes they get hot, which is why you need to put a heatsink on it if you want it to have a decent lifespan.

Many recent motherboards have a piece of metal that has thermal pads on it that contact the M.2 drives.

 

11 minutes ago, Sakkura said:

To some extent yes, but it's not a problem. If the controller gets hot it will just run a little slower, but it will still be faster than a SATA SSD. And if the flash memory gets hot, that is actually beneficial for data retention.

That only applies when reading or writing data.

There is higher probability of data loss and flipped bits when the drive temp is higher.

There's a reason consumer SSDs are usually only rated for 50-60C.

It is NOT safe for an SSD to reach 80 or 90+ degrees.

Not only will that cause flipped bits, it can also kill the drive sooner.


My sound system costs more than my PC.        Check out my S340 build log "White Heaven"        The "LIGHTCANON" flashlight build log        Project AntiRoll (prototype)        Custom speaker project

Spoiler

Intel i7 4790k | ASUS GTX770 | ASUS Sabertooth Z97 Mark S | Corsair Vengeance Pro 32GB | NZXT S340 | Seasonic Platinum 760 | modded H100i | Ducky ONE White TKL RGB | Logitech MX Master 2S | 2x Samsung 850 Pro 512GB | WD Red 4TB Samsung 58" 4k TV | 2x Behringer NEKKST K8 | BIC Acoustech H-100II | Scarlett 2i4 | 2x AT2020

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

660p has a bad endurance rating. Only 200tbw for 1tb drive. Its fine if you just game and surf, but avoid if you often edit large files.

 

At least here in EU corsair mp510 is the best option. 205€ for 960GB with 1700 tbw. 970 evo has 600tbw and costs more.

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Enderman said:

That only applies when reading or writing data.

There is higher probability of data loss and flipped bits when the drive temp is higher.

There's a reason consumer SSDs are usually only rated for 50-60C.

It is NOT safe for an SSD to reach 80 or 90+ degrees.

Not only will that cause flipped bits, it can also kill the drive sooner.

That applies to DRAM, not NAND flash. Data retention for NAND flash is better the higher the temperature.

 

3 hours ago, thinwalrus said:

660p has a bad endurance rating. Only 200tbw for 1tb drive. Its fine if you just game and surf, but avoid if you often edit large files.

 

At least here in EU corsair mp510 is the best option. 205€ for 960GB with 1700 tbw. 970 evo has 600tbw and costs more.

Endurance rating is not indicative of actual endurance. It's just what their warranty covers. And even 200 TBW is quite a lot; I have an SSD from 2012, and I've only written 36 TB to it.

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Sakkura said:

That applies to DRAM, not NAND flash. Data retention for NAND flash is better the higher the temperature.

No, it is not.

Take a guess why SSDs have a max temperature rating.

https://www.anandtech.com/show/9248/the-truth-about-ssd-data-retention

"as the temperature increases, the electrons escape the floating gate faster that ultimately changes the voltage state of the cell and renders data unreadable (i.e. the drive no longer retains data). "

This is called flipped bits.


My sound system costs more than my PC.        Check out my S340 build log "White Heaven"        The "LIGHTCANON" flashlight build log        Project AntiRoll (prototype)        Custom speaker project

Spoiler

Intel i7 4790k | ASUS GTX770 | ASUS Sabertooth Z97 Mark S | Corsair Vengeance Pro 32GB | NZXT S340 | Seasonic Platinum 760 | modded H100i | Ducky ONE White TKL RGB | Logitech MX Master 2S | 2x Samsung 850 Pro 512GB | WD Red 4TB Samsung 58" 4k TV | 2x Behringer NEKKST K8 | BIC Acoustech H-100II | Scarlett 2i4 | 2x AT2020

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Enderman said:

No, it is not.

Take a guess why SSDs have a max temperature rating.

https://www.anandtech.com/show/9248/the-truth-about-ssd-data-retention

"as the temperature increases, the electrons escape the floating gate faster that ultimately changes the voltage state of the cell and renders data unreadable (i.e. the drive no longer retains data). "

This is called flipped bits.

That refers to when the SSD is unpowered:

 

Quote

The conductivity of a semiconductor scales with temperature, which is bad news for NAND because when it's unpowered the electrons are not supposed to move as that would change the charge of the cell. In other words, as the temperature increases, the electrons escape the floating gate faster that ultimately changes the voltage state of the cell and renders data unreadable (i.e. the drive no longer retains data). 

Meanwhile, it's the other way around when the SSD is powered:

 

Quote

For active use the temperature has the opposite effect. Because higher temperature makes the silicon more conductive, the flow of current is higher during program/erase operation and causes less stress on the tunnel oxide, improving the endurance of the cell because endurance is practically limited by tunnel oxide's ability to hold the electrons inside the floating gate.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Sakkura said:

That refers to when the SSD is unpowered:

Yes I know, that's why I linked the article, so you could read it.

It is not healthy for it to be that hot.

Also heat only offers an improvement when powered at reasonable temperatures, like 40 or 50C.

If you put any SSD at 90C+ it will certainly have decreased lifespan.

If you put it at like 120C it will instantly die.

 

Try imagining what happens to the silicon when it is so hot that it is so conductive that the current flow is extremely high.

Did you know that what kills electronic components is current, because it causes them to heat up?

Silicon is supposed to be a semiconductor, not a conductor, so having high conductivity all the time is not good because it needs to close the gate too.


My sound system costs more than my PC.        Check out my S340 build log "White Heaven"        The "LIGHTCANON" flashlight build log        Project AntiRoll (prototype)        Custom speaker project

Spoiler

Intel i7 4790k | ASUS GTX770 | ASUS Sabertooth Z97 Mark S | Corsair Vengeance Pro 32GB | NZXT S340 | Seasonic Platinum 760 | modded H100i | Ducky ONE White TKL RGB | Logitech MX Master 2S | 2x Samsung 850 Pro 512GB | WD Red 4TB Samsung 58" 4k TV | 2x Behringer NEKKST K8 | BIC Acoustech H-100II | Scarlett 2i4 | 2x AT2020

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Enderman said:

Yes I know, that's why I linked the article, so you could read it. 

It is not healthy for it to be that hot.

Also heat only offers an improvement when powered at reasonable temperatures, like 40 or 50C.

If you put any SSD at 90C+ it will certainly have decreased lifespan.

If you put it at like 120C it will instantly die. 

 

Try imagining what happens to the silicon when it is so hot that it is so conductive that the current flow is extremely high.

Did you know that what kills electronic components is current, because it causes them to heat up?

Silicon is supposed to be a semiconductor, not a conductor, so having high conductivity all the time is not good because it needs to close the gate too.

Okay, that is true. Extreme temperature will harm the SSD. Both controller and NAND flash. It's just not really going to happen to the NAND flash in practice, the controller runs hotter.

 

The article only looks at temperatures up to 55C, for comparison.

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Sakkura said:

Okay, that is true. Extreme temperature will harm the SSD. Both controller and NAND flash. It's just not really going to happen to the NAND flash in practice, the controller runs hotter.

 

The article only looks at temperatures up to 55C, for comparison.

Yes that's my point, 55C is fine but I've seen M.2 SSDs get MUCH hotter than that.

The case needs to have good airflow, preferably flowing over the NVME SSD.

Best case scenario is you stick a heatsink on it.


My sound system costs more than my PC.        Check out my S340 build log "White Heaven"        The "LIGHTCANON" flashlight build log        Project AntiRoll (prototype)        Custom speaker project

Spoiler

Intel i7 4790k | ASUS GTX770 | ASUS Sabertooth Z97 Mark S | Corsair Vengeance Pro 32GB | NZXT S340 | Seasonic Platinum 760 | modded H100i | Ducky ONE White TKL RGB | Logitech MX Master 2S | 2x Samsung 850 Pro 512GB | WD Red 4TB Samsung 58" 4k TV | 2x Behringer NEKKST K8 | BIC Acoustech H-100II | Scarlett 2i4 | 2x AT2020

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, AlexTheGreatish said:

M.2 can have performance decrease due to heat, but even then it will still be faster than a SATA drive.  Basically if you can afford the NVME drive then get that one, it's waaaay faster than sata.

An LMG staff member should know better than to make blanket statements like that. You aren't even using accurate terms. Modern consumer drives either use the SATA or PCIe interface.

 

A PCIe drive (sometimes called an M.2 drive, even though that's just the form factor, or NVMe drive, even though that's just the protocol) generally has much faster sequential speeds, but the random read speeds, which is what matters most to the average user, may or may not be faster than a SATA drive. I've seen PCIe drives that were slower than cheaper SATA ones. Unless you're managing large files regularly (at least 1GB), such as with video editing, you probably won't notice a difference.


Make sure to quote or tag me (@JoostinOnline) or I won't see your response!

PSU Tier List  |  How to build a gaming PC for $400US or less   |  The Real Reason Delidding Improves Temperatures

Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, Enderman said:

Yes that's my point, 55C is fine but I've seen M.2 SSDs get MUCH hotter than that.

The case needs to have good airflow, preferably flowing over the NVME SSD.

Best case scenario is you stick a heatsink on it. 

That's the controller getting hotter, not the flash memory.

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Sakkura said:

That's the controller getting hotter, not the flash memory.

The controller is literally millimeters away form the flash memory.


My sound system costs more than my PC.        Check out my S340 build log "White Heaven"        The "LIGHTCANON" flashlight build log        Project AntiRoll (prototype)        Custom speaker project

Spoiler

Intel i7 4790k | ASUS GTX770 | ASUS Sabertooth Z97 Mark S | Corsair Vengeance Pro 32GB | NZXT S340 | Seasonic Platinum 760 | modded H100i | Ducky ONE White TKL RGB | Logitech MX Master 2S | 2x Samsung 850 Pro 512GB | WD Red 4TB Samsung 58" 4k TV | 2x Behringer NEKKST K8 | BIC Acoustech H-100II | Scarlett 2i4 | 2x AT2020

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Sakkura said:

That applies to DRAM, not NAND flash. Data retention for NAND flash is better the higher the temperature.

 

Endurance rating is not indicative of actual endurance. It's just what their warranty covers. And even 200 TBW is quite a lot; I have an SSD from 2012, and I've only written 36 TB to it.

So you dont edit large files often. Read before reply...

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Buy VPN

×