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VMWare for linux in Windows10?

Is VMware going to run a linux distro problem free from within Windows 10?

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12 minutes ago, tinpanalley said:

Is VMware going to run a linux distro problem free from within Windows 10?

Use VirtualBox.

Edited by nox_
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Virtual Box

( the only VM I know)

i hope that’s helpful 

Hi

 

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hi

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Ok, but there are no complications at all that can occur? I don't know... shared files with Windows that mess things up, driver issues?

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just try it, its free.

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Just now, tinpanalley said:

Ok, but there are no complications at all that can occur? I don't know... shared files with Windows that mess things up, driver issues?

No. That's why you use it in the first place, you can't fuck up your main os while using vm.

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Yeah I know. I saw some guy saying he ended up with some problem when rebooting his Win10 system. Can't find the link.

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Dual booting will, but installing VM will not.

VM is like a program, you need to run windows first and run it.

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I run VMWare and I've never had a problem with it.

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2 hours ago, tinpanalley said:

Is VMware going to run a linux distro problem free from within Windows 10?

I've been using VMware to run Linux in a VM for close to a decade now, so yes, it works fine.

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11 hours ago, tinpanalley said:

Is VMware going to run a linux distro problem free from within Windows 10?

To answer the actual question - yes, it will.

Don't ask to ask, just ask... please 🤨

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Just a list of my personal scores for some products, in no particular order, with brief comments. I just got the idea to do them so they aren't many for now :)

Don't take these as complete reviews or final truths - they are just my personal impressions on products I may or may not have used, summed up in a couple of sentences and a rough score. All scores take into account the unit's price and time of release, heavily so, therefore don't expect absolute performance to be reflected here.

 

-Lenovo Thinkpad X220 - [8/10]

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A pretty good product, sunk by its price (plus the extra cost of the physical keyboard and the pencil). Buy it if you don't mind the Apple tax and are looking for a very light office machine with an excellent digitizer. Particularly good for rich students. Bad for cheap tinkerers like myself.

 

 

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10 minutes ago, Sauron said:

To answer the actual question - yes, it will.

Ok. Thank you.

Now to add a question... Why virtuallybox over vmware. Aren't they just options that do the same thing?

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15 minutes ago, tinpanalley said:

Ok. Thank you.

Now to add a question... Why virtuallybox over vmware. Aren't they just options that do the same thing?

Yes, VirtualBox, VMWare, HyperV, etc. are all different programs to do the same thing: run a virtual machine. Think of it like Chrome vs Firefox. Same purpose, different developer.

 

Because VirtualBox is free and easy to use and more than enough for most home uses. VMWare is a bit more "professional" with features you probably don't need.

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Awesome. So there is nothing about running Linux "inside" Windows that is taxing on RAM, GPU (when gaming), or seek times on hdds?

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4 minutes ago, tinpanalley said:

So there is nothing about running Linux "inside" Windows that is taxing on RAM, GPU (when gaming), or seek times on hdds?

Just to clarify, if you will game while running a vm a part of your ram will be used, part of cpu and etc., but if you turn it off it won't be used. Don't game while running a vm and you will be fine.

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17 minutes ago, nox_ said:

Just to clarify, if you will game while running a vm a part of your ram will be used, part of cpu and etc., but if you turn it off it won't be used. Don't game while running a vm and you will be fine.

Sorry, I was referring to running games from within Linux. Wine is one of the things I wanna test to get a sense of how it works and feels.

So if we set gaming aside if RAM gets heavily occupied by virtual machines, would you say it's not an ideal scenario running Linux from within Windows to easily swap between them for purely productivity reasons? Or is it fine for that?

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36 minutes ago, tinpanalley said:

Sorry, I was referring to running games from within Linux. Wine is one of the things I wanna test to get a sense of how it works and feels.

So if we set gaming aside if RAM gets heavily occupied by virtual machines, would you say it's not an ideal scenario running Linux from within Windows to easily swap between them for purely productivity reasons? Or is it fine for that?

The VM will use as much RAM as you assign to it, same goes for the CPU. The virtual machine is just that, a "virtual machine" that acts as much as possible like a real one. You can decide how much RAM it has, how many CPU cores it gets etc (only limited by your real hardware).

 

Performance inside a VM is typically about 90%+ of a real machine (assuming it is the only thing taxing the hardware right now). However, 3D can be a bit of a problem unless you can give it a dedicated GPU with GPU passthrough. So gaming in a VM is usually not ideal. In that case I'd rather go for dual-boot.

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7 hours ago, Eigenvektor said:

The VM will use as much RAM as you assign to it, same goes for the CPU. The virtual machine is just that, a "virtual machine" that acts as much as possible like a real one. You can decide how much RAM it has, how many CPU cores it gets etc (only limited by your real hardware).

 

Performance inside a VM is typically about 90%+ of a real machine (assuming it is the only thing taxing the hardware right now). However, 3D can be a bit of a problem unless you can give it a dedicated GPU with GPU passthrough. So gaming in a VM is usually not ideal. In that case I'd rather go for dual-boot.

Yeah, I hear ya. I'd just like to give Linux a good go for once and not on a USB flash drive. Even with persistent storage, a flash drive simply doesn't run at the smoothness of a regular system. And the majority of what we do with our system is pc, productivity and web stuff. But we do do a LOT of gaming in Windows. So I wanted that ability to quickly snap back.

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1 hour ago, tinpanalley said:

Yeah, I hear ya. I'd just like to give Linux a good go for once and not on a USB flash drive. Even with persistent storage, a flash drive simply doesn't run at the smoothness of a regular system. And the majority of what we do with our system is pc, productivity and web stuff. But we do do a LOT of gaming in Windows. So I wanted that ability to quickly snap back.

A VM is faster for quickly switching back, but a reboot doesn't take all that long either. By dual boot I meant to install Linux on the SSD alongside Windows, not running it off of a USB stick. That will give you the best performance. The only risk is that you could mess up your Windows install if you don't pay attention while installing Linux.

 

Running it inside a VM is certainly less intrusive and easier to get rid off if you decide its not for you. I just fear you'll get a bad impression if you try gaming in a VM since, like I said, you'll most likely be missing 3D hardware acceleration.

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9 hours ago, Eigenvektor said:

The only risk is that you could mess up your Windows install if you don't pay attention while installing Linux.

 

Running it inside a VM is certainly less intrusive and easier to get rid off if you decide its not for you. I just fear you'll get a bad impression if you try gaming in a VM since, like I said, you'll most likely be missing 3D hardware acceleration.

Yeah, that mixing up with Windows is something I've been told. That even certain Windows updates can screw the Linux install or vice versa and can cause you bootloader problems. Sounds like a hassle particularly since I don't even know if I'll like Linux enough yet. I literally come back to this "ok, gonna try linux" phase once a year. I get the USB install going, I say I'm gonna try a more stable install, I don't get around to it, I leave it. I just wanna really get into it this time so I can give it a fair shot. A friend recently was installing Ubuntu while videochatting because he had had enough of Windows and it sparked my interest to try again.

 

Don't worry, I'm able to be objective in my observations. I will try to game a bit just to see how Wine works but honestly, if the VM were to work perfectly, there would be no reason to game on linux. I'd just CTRL-F out of there and go to Windows. Now, problem already is that I installed it fine and was running it and I couldn't log into anything that needed the password because I hadn't noted it down. None of the instructions I found for resetting the password worked. So I removed the whole thing and I'm going to start again. (Consequently, unrelated, but I really dislike the look of Ubuntu. So iOS. Not a huge fan of the colour scheme either or even the UI. But nothing is as easy or supported as Ubuntu right? I was once told Zorin was great for modifications)

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6 minutes ago, tinpanalley said:

certain Windows updates can screw the Linux install or vice versa and can cause you bootloader problems.

That's not really the case. I use a dualboot system, never had any issues with that and I use this kind of setup for about five years.

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1 minute ago, tinpanalley said:

Yeah, that mixing up with Windows is something I've been told. That even certain Windows updates can screw the Linux install or vice versa and can cause you bootloader problems.

I've been dual booting for several years and never run into such issues. But of course I'm only a single person. The biggest risk I see would be during installation if you don't pay attention and accidentally delete a Windows partition or something.

 

If the UI of Ubuntu is not your thing, you could always try Kubuntu, though I'm not really a fan of KDE myself. There's a ton of other desktop environments to choose from, that you can install and switch between at a whim, if you desire.

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Currently playing with Ubuntu... I say this as a total noob, but is it possible that just in a few hours I'm feeling a bit constrained by the lack of customization options? Is it possible that I could need more? I'm not a total linux novice. I've played with it for years, and on PC I wouldn't say I'm a hardcore PRO user, but I certainly don't run a vanilla Windows 10 desktop with no customization and 3rd party programs. Could Ubuntu be too simple for my tastes?

 

Question for you all... If I have media storage drives on my desktop, can my VM Linux access them without causing any problems from two OSes accessing those drives?

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9 minutes ago, tinpanalley said:

Currently playing with Ubuntu... I say this as a total noob, but is it possible that just in a few hours I'm feeling a bit constrained by the lack of customization options? Is it possible that I could need more? I'm not a total linux novice. I've played with it for years, and on PC I wouldn't say I'm a hardcore PRO user, but I certainly don't run a vanilla Windows 10 desktop with no customization and 3rd party programs. Could Ubuntu be too simple for my tastes?

 

Question for you all... If I have media storage drives on my desktop, can my VM Linux access them without causing any problems from two OSes accessing those drives?

There's always Arch :D

I haven't had much issues with accessing storage drives, you should be fine.

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