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Motherboard make a CPU more hotter?

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Sorry might sound like a stupid question but need to ask. :) Obviously under load the CPU will get hot and temps will raise, but can a motherboard make the CPU more hot meaning more higher temps?  because  maybe of a option in the motherboard bios that needs to be disabled or maybe enabled for that matter?

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stop and rewrite your post. If I get what your saying does the motherboard effect cpu temps, yeah it controls the fan and voltage. 

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15 minutes ago, GDRRiley said:

stop and rewrite your post. If I get what your saying does the motherboard effect cpu temps, yeah it controls the fan and voltage. 

Apart from the voltage which obviously if you set it  manually should stay at that,  could there be any other option(s) that need to be turned off or on in bios that could effect the temps on the CPU? Sorry this is what i really meant to ask.

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Some motherboards have the default voltage a bit higher than others.

For example, a processor may need 1.2v to operate at stock frequencies and it tells this to the motherboard (or the bios has some "voltage tables" memorized which say for that processor you want to use this default voltage) but if you leave everything default (set on "auto" on bios), a motherboard may set the voltage to 1.225v or 1.25v. 

If you push a button to enable "auto overclock", a motherboard may have some premade "templates" and configure the voltage to 1.38v , other motherboards may simply decide to use 1.4v for the same "auto overclock" functionality.

 

All voltages would be safe for the processor, the processor wouldn't be damaged, but the higher the voltage the higher the losses and therefore more heat.

 

also ... on some intel boards (in particular asus) there's a function called multi core enhancement or something like that. If it's on auto, it's enabled, and that makes all cpu cores function all the time at the turbo speed, instead of just a few cores going up to that turbo speed. Basically, it's an overclocking... the cpu would use more power so it would produce more heat, but you'd also have more performance since the processor runs all cores at higher frequencies.

 

 

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4 minutes ago, mariushm said:

Some motherboards have the default voltage a bit higher than others.

For example, a processor may need 1.2v to operate at stock frequencies and it tells this to the motherboard (or the bios has some "voltage tables" memorized which say for that processor you want to use this default voltage) but if you leave everything default (set on "auto" on bios), a motherboard may set the voltage to 1.225v or 1.25v. 

If you push a button to enable "auto overclock", a motherboard may have some premade "templates" and configure the voltage to 1.38v , other motherboards may simply decide to use 1.4v for the same "auto overclock" functionality.

 

All voltages would be safe for the processor, the processor wouldn't be damaged, but the higher the voltage the higher the losses and therefore more heat.

 

Thanks for that are there any softwares to monitor the cpu voltage and see in real time if it changes? when your doing a cpu stress test.

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1 minute ago, Shadowman said:

Thanks for that are there any softwares to monitor the cpu voltages and see in real time if it changes? when your doing a cpu stress test.

I use HWmonitor and HWinfo

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The voltage will change constantly, depending on the frequency of the cores. At lower frequencies, the processor doesn't need a high voltage to be stable, so it tells the motherboard that it can lower the voltage to save power and generate less heat.

So for example, your cores running at 3 Ghz may need 1.2v to be stable and do work, but when you're in Windows watching a Youtube videos, the CPU cores would almost do no work so they can reduce their frequency to 1 Ghz and at those levels, maybe 1.0v would be enough.

Voltage adjustments happen quite often, and there's usually some voltage tables defined for various "levels" or frequency steps. It won't help you to write down the voltages in software.

 

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Well, in theory, worse VRM could make your chip run slightly bit hotter, but it shouldn't be anything noticeable

 

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