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Making Intel's Worst Product Better.... And Also Worse

AlexTheGreatish
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Intel's i9-12900KS is an incredibly fast processor... but what if we made it faster?

 

 

Check out the RockItCool Cooper IHS: https://rockitcool.myshopify.com/collections/12th-gen-intel-processor

 

Buy an Intel Core i9-12900KS: https://geni.us/mEYYHt5

Buy an ASUS Maximus Z690 Hero: https://geni.us/BW2w0

Buy a Nvidia GeForce RTX 3090 Ti: https://geni.us/spQ428B

Purchases made through some store links may provide some compensation to Linus Media Group.

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Pro tip: just swap the springs to stronger ones and you don't have to go through this.  Delidding only made sense when it wasn't a soldered IHS.

 

-EK makes a LGA1700 backplate.  You need this to not bow the motherboard.

-9657K292 on McMaster for the springs.  Tighten until just before fully compressed.

-M4 x 55mm screws.  Also some M4 fender washers and nuts.  Build a stack of: washer - spring - washer - nut.  Keep the spring centered on the washers while tightening.

Workstation:  12900KF @ 5.2Ghz || MSI Pro-A Z690 DDR4 || MSI Gaming Trio 4090 Shunt || G.Skill 3866 4x8GB || Corsair AX1500i@240V || whole-house loop.

LANRig/GuestGamingBox: 9900nonK || Gigabyte Z390 Master || ASUS TUF 3090 650W shunt || Corsair SF600 || CPU+GPU watercooled 280 rad pull only || whole-house loop.

Server Router (Untangle): 8350K @ 4.7Ghz || ASRock Z370 ITX || 2x8GB 3200 || PicoPSU 250W, running on AX1200i || whole-house loop.

Server Compute/Storage: 10850K @ 5.1Ghz || Gigabyte Z490 Ultra || EVGA FTW3 3090 1000W || LSI 9280i-24 port || 4TB Samsung 860 Evo, 5x10TB Seagate Enterprise Raid 6, 4x8TB Seagate Archive Backup ||  whole-house loop.

Laptop: HP Elitebook 840 G8 (Intel 1185G7) + 3080Ti Thunderbolt Dock, Razer Blade Stealth 13" 2017 (Intel 8550U)

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People complained about Intel using TIM instead of solder, and resorted to delidding them. Now they’re soldered and they’re still being delidded? Jeez.

 

There is next to no headroom for overclocking nowadays. Intel is pretty much foot to the floor. 

My eyes see the past…

My camera lens sees the present…

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This is useless. Liquid metal will just diffuse into raw copper and dry up, causing mega massive overheating after few weeks when you'll least be expecting it. How do I know? Been there, happened every single god damn time. And I thought I was doing it wrong and redone it all two more times and this time watched Der8auer on how he applies LM exactly. Same result. LM just diffused into both, copper coldplate of a CPU AiO as well as into graphic card hearsink base, dried up and caused hard system crashing because GPU was freaking out.

 

I'm not touching LM ever again. Not only it's total garbage even on copper which it doesn't react with like it does with aluminium, but it still just diffuses into it after a month which makes it even dumber and more random when you already forget you've done it. And secondly, it stains copper so badly I had to sand off a layer of copper on both AiO and graphic card to get it clean again. God damn LM even stained a nickel platted IHS of my Intel CPU to a point it looked like cat vomited on it and I left it like that forever since then. LM is great for 1 such run and then you trash the system for next project. It's entirely and utterly useless for long term use.

 

Just use Kryonaut instead. It's still super high performing paste and you can clean it off using paper towels and some alcohol. No fuss, no drama and works reliably for months and years.

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I've gone into the deep end on this with some calculations. It seems that the way the cpu is held down together with the pin array causes the pcb/ihs to bend (made a video about this). From FEA i've seen about 0,05mm concavity. with kryonaut that would already cause a 5 Degrees C difference.

2022-04-18 12_29_51-Autodesk Inventor Professional 2023.png

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1 hour ago, nutral said:

I've gone into the deep end on this with some calculations. It seems that the way the cpu is held down together with the pin array causes the pcb/ihs to bend (made a video about this). From FEA i've seen about 0,05mm concavity. with kryonaut that would already cause a 5 Degrees C difference.

2022-04-18 12_29_51-Autodesk Inventor Professional 2023.png

This needs a key lol, I thought for a split second that that was how far it was bending irl.

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2 hours ago, RejZoR said:

This is useless. Liquid metal will just diffuse into raw copper and dry up, causing mega massive overheating after few weeks when you'll least be expecting it. How do I know? Been there, happened every single god damn time. And I thought I was doing it wrong and redone it all two more times and this time watched Der8auer on how he applies LM exactly. Same result. LM just diffused into both, copper coldplate of a CPU AiO as well as into graphic card hearsink base, dried up and caused hard system crashing because GPU was freaking out.

 

I'm not touching LM ever again. Not only it's total garbage even on copper which it doesn't react with like it does with aluminium, but it still just diffuses into it after a month which makes it even dumber and more random when you already forget you've done it. And secondly, it stains copper so badly I had to sand off a layer of copper on both AiO and graphic card to get it clean again. God damn LM even stained a nickel platted IHS of my Intel CPU to a point it looked like cat vomited on it and I left it like that forever since then. LM is great for 1 such run and then you trash the system for next project. It's entirely and utterly useless for long term use.

 

Just use Kryonaut instead. It's still super high performing paste and you can clean it off using paper towels and some alcohol. No fuss, no drama and works reliably for months and years.

LM works fine on nickel plate.  Been on my 3090 since 2020 release, no change in performance.

 

I don't know about copper personally because I really only work with nickel plate, but GN found no performance difference with stained copper or LM drying out.

Workstation:  12900KF @ 5.2Ghz || MSI Pro-A Z690 DDR4 || MSI Gaming Trio 4090 Shunt || G.Skill 3866 4x8GB || Corsair AX1500i@240V || whole-house loop.

LANRig/GuestGamingBox: 9900nonK || Gigabyte Z390 Master || ASUS TUF 3090 650W shunt || Corsair SF600 || CPU+GPU watercooled 280 rad pull only || whole-house loop.

Server Router (Untangle): 8350K @ 4.7Ghz || ASRock Z370 ITX || 2x8GB 3200 || PicoPSU 250W, running on AX1200i || whole-house loop.

Server Compute/Storage: 10850K @ 5.1Ghz || Gigabyte Z490 Ultra || EVGA FTW3 3090 1000W || LSI 9280i-24 port || 4TB Samsung 860 Evo, 5x10TB Seagate Enterprise Raid 6, 4x8TB Seagate Archive Backup ||  whole-house loop.

Laptop: HP Elitebook 840 G8 (Intel 1185G7) + 3080Ti Thunderbolt Dock, Razer Blade Stealth 13" 2017 (Intel 8550U)

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13 hours ago, AnonymousGuy said:

LM works fine on nickel plate.  Been on my 3090 since 2020 release, no change in performance.

 

I don't know about copper personally because I really only work with nickel plate, but GN found no performance difference with stained copper or LM drying out.

Yeah, well, it didn't for me. Haswell-E has nickel platted copper IHS and it looked like it was permanently ruined after applying LM, to a point you couldn't read anything that was laser engraved on it in the factory. The other side which was the cooler made of raw copper it just diffused all the LM into the copper, drying up the contact between IHS and cooler, causing weird temperature spikes and system instability. After ditching it and replacing it with Kryonaut, I haven't had any issues with it whatsoever. I'm not touching LM junk ever again. It's just not worth it with all the problems I had. And I bought two syringes of it thinking this will be my last definitive thermal solution, especially since it doesn't really get old like regular pastes. Boy I was wrong.

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So if I'm understanding correctly, the part that you bought is better because it is flatter, which means there is more metal-to-metal contact, and metal does a better job at moving the heat to the cooler than the thermal compound does. And this allows you to push the unit more without it overheating and throttling itself.

 

Now, if this is the reason, wouldn't it mean that to get EVEN BETTER results, you can replace the cooling system's copper plate with an extremely flat copper plate? Wouldn't that increase the metal-to-metal contact?

 

Sure, the returns wouldn't be much, but it WAS said right at the start of the video that the goal for this machine is to "Beat the competition, price or practicality be damned"...

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6 minutes ago, Arthilios said:

So if I'm understanding correctly, the part that you bought is better because it is flatter, which means there is more metal-to-metal contact, and metal does a better job at moving the heat to the cooler than the thermal compound does. And this allows you to push the unit more without it overheating and throttling itself.

 

Now, if this is the reason, wouldn't it mean that to get EVEN BETTER results, you can replace the cooling system's copper plate with an extremely flat copper plate? Wouldn't that increase the metal-to-metal contact?

 

Sure, the returns wouldn't be much, but it WAS said right at the start of the video that the goal for this machine is to "Beat the competition, price or practicality be damned"...

And if this is the solution, couldn't you take it a step further by just making a custom plate that replaces the CPU's plate and directly connects to the cooler? As in, remove the copper plate you bought, remove the plate on the cooling system, make a custom plate that essentially connects the two, removing any space that would be between the cooler and the CPU plate. Because again "... practicality be damned".

Edited by Arthilios
added extra explanation, to remove potential confusion.
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On 4/20/2022 at 4:14 PM, Arthilios said:

And if this is the solution, couldn't you take it a step further by just making a custom plate that replaces the CPU's plate and directly connects to the cooler? As in, remove the copper plate you bought, remove the plate on the cooling system, make a custom plate that essentially connects the two, removing any space that would be between the cooler and the CPU plate. Because again "... practicality be damned".

We've done this before actually: 

 

It does help with your temps but having a bare die is pretty scary.

 

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