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Cybernetics vs. 80Plus

Hello Guys,

 

I'm looking for a new PSU right now to gear up fot my hopefully anytimr arriving 3090.

I went for the Corsair RM850 their but that's not the question.

 

My question is, how to compare Cybernetics to 80Plus Standart, the RM850 has 80Plus Gold (230V) and I think Cybernetics 92% (230V)

 

This all confuses me a bit some PSU are rated better in Cybernetics and some are rated better by 80Plus. I think there is one PSU that isn't even 80Plus rated but has Cybernetics A+.

Also not to forget that there is a difference in 80Plus 110V and 230V also Cybernetics, I think there are thousends of People who bought an 80Plus Gold PSU for example in the EU and didn't even realise that it's not very good on 230V. PSUs with 230V rating are very rare.

For example the Seasonic Prime Titanium Series has 80Plus Titanium and Cybernetics 92% for 110V but only 89% for 230V which would be 80Plus Gold for 230V but like I saif 80Plus 230V is quite rare.

 

What is your oppinion on the PSU Standarts, which one do you trust, or do you maybe even have a 80Plus 110V PSU and live in a country with 230V like me with my bequiet fable a few years ago?

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You are actually reading it wrong.

 

Efficiently increases across the board going from 110V to 230V because higher current higher efficiently.

 

And yes I just looked to make sure there wasn't a mistake.

 

115V

Prime Titanium 750W  ATX12V  750  92.387

 

230V

Prime Titanium  750W  ATX12V  750  94.199

 

 

115V

AX1600i  ATX12V  1600  92.478

 

230V

AX1600i  ATX12V  1600  94.081

 

 

And no 230V PSUs aren't rare at all, modern PSUs are switching PSUs so they automatically switch from 115V to 230V.

 

 

And Gold Rated...

 

115V

 

RM850x (2018)  (Sample #3)  ATX12V  850  88.369

 

 

230V

 

RM850x (2018)  (Sample #3)  ATX12V 850   90.393 

 

 

i9 9900K @ 5.0 GHz, NH D15, 32 GB DDR4 3200 GSKILL Trident Z RGB, AORUS Z390 MASTER, EVGA RTX 3080 FTW3 Ultra, Samsung 970 EVO Plus 500GB, Samsung 860 EVO 1TB, Samsung 860 EVO 500GB, ASUS ROG Swift PG279Q 27", Steel Series APEX PRO, Logitech Gaming Pro Mouse, CM Master Case 5, Corsair AXI 1600W Titanium. 

 

i7 8086K, AORUS Z370 Gaming 5, 16GB GSKILL RJV DDR4 3200, EVGA 2080TI FTW3 Ultra, Samsung 970 EVO 250GB, (2)SAMSUNG 860 EVO 500 GB, Acer Predator XB1 XB271HU, Corsair HXI 850W.

 

i7 8700K, AORUS Z370 Ultra Gaming, 16GB 16GB DDR4 3000, EVGA 1080Ti FTW3 Ultra, Samsung 960 EVO 250GB, Corsair HX 850W.

 

 

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34 minutes ago, Ankerson said:

Efficiently increases across the board going from 110V to 230V because higher current higher efficiently.

Higher voltage means lower current

 

But yes, power supplies on 230v are typically more efficient than they are on 115V

CPU: Intel i7 6700k  | Motherboard: Gigabyte Z170x Gaming 5 | RAM: 2x16GB 3000MHz Corsair Vengeance LPX | GPU: Gigabyte Aorus GTX 1080ti | PSU: Corsair RM750x (2018) | Case: BeQuiet SilentBase 800 | Cooler: Corsair H100i AIO | SSD: Samsung 970 Evo 500GB + Samsung 840 500GB + Crucial MX500 2TB | HDD: Seagate Ironwolf 8TB + 2x Seagate Ironwolf 6TB | Monitor: Acer Predator XB271HU + Samsung BX2450

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2 minutes ago, Spotty said:

Higher voltage means lower current

 

But yes, power supplies on 230v are typically more efficient than they are on 115V

 

230V is easier on the PSU than 115V also.

 

 

i9 9900K @ 5.0 GHz, NH D15, 32 GB DDR4 3200 GSKILL Trident Z RGB, AORUS Z390 MASTER, EVGA RTX 3080 FTW3 Ultra, Samsung 970 EVO Plus 500GB, Samsung 860 EVO 1TB, Samsung 860 EVO 500GB, ASUS ROG Swift PG279Q 27", Steel Series APEX PRO, Logitech Gaming Pro Mouse, CM Master Case 5, Corsair AXI 1600W Titanium. 

 

i7 8086K, AORUS Z370 Gaming 5, 16GB GSKILL RJV DDR4 3200, EVGA 2080TI FTW3 Ultra, Samsung 970 EVO 250GB, (2)SAMSUNG 860 EVO 500 GB, Acer Predator XB1 XB271HU, Corsair HXI 850W.

 

i7 8700K, AORUS Z370 Ultra Gaming, 16GB 16GB DDR4 3000, EVGA 1080Ti FTW3 Ultra, Samsung 960 EVO 250GB, Corsair HX 850W.

 

 

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80 Plus rating is more "relaxed" and not as comprehensive as Cybernetics ratings. 

 

80 Plus only measures efficiency at 10%, 20%, 50%, 100% loads and does it in a somewhat "loose" benchmark. For example, they don't stress too much about ambient temperature, which could vary in their lab between let's say 20c and 25c.  If you're lucky and get the psu tested at closer to 20c ambient, your psu may get a tiny bit better efficiency. 

Also, according to some people, they're fairly easy to fool, as in you could submit a few models with shorter psu cables, or a more powerful fan that cools better and makes psu noisier but gets the psu to get into 80plus bronze or whatever... they don't review the psu when it's released and on the shelves, when it comes with thinner and/or longer cables, with different fan etc etc.

 

Cybernetics as far as I know buy the psus from stores, they don't use models sent by manufacturer, and they have a better controlled environment and more comprehensive tests and they also test things like noise which are not covered by 80plus

 

The higher the input voltage, the better the efficiency of a psu.  

Most modern power supplies have a Active PFC circuit which takes whatever input voltage you give the psu, rectifies it and boosts it to around 400-420v and then that 400-420v gets pushed through those transformers inside and converted to 12v and smaller voltages. 

It's more efficient to convert a high voltage to a slightly higher voltage (200-250v -> x 1.414 => ~320v -> 420v) , instead of lower voltage to high voltage (90v-110v  -> x 1.414 = ~ 175v -> 420v) 

The higher the currents, the more losses you have ( power  = current 2 x resistance  ) ... so if you keep input currents low, you get less losses 

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