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1000 W PSU??

Gorge
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 He just had a question I have a gaming PC with the 600 W power supply B1.  It’s not good enough I’m going to upgraded, can I upgrade two 1000 80+Gold?

i7 7700K

GTX 1060 6gb OCed

 Lots of hard drives and 10+ system fans and lots of LEDs and case fan control hub.

 I’m planning to get a GTX 1080 in the future, is the wattage to high?

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Just now, James Evens said:

1000W? i7, gtx 1060 depending on your OC is 200W. Let assume the 10 drives and fan is another 150W this makes 350W.

If they are spinning drives they may use 10-15w after spin up, but they will use significantly more as they start up.

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One drive only consume 10 watts at the most.

Even dual 1080 on SLI only consume 400 watt total.

1000 watt is way over, no problem if you have money to burn.

You'll need 4 CPU + 4 GPU to max out 1000 watt.

Ryzen 3600 @ 4.5ghz all cores | Asrock B550M Steel Legend | Radeon RX580 | 2x Samsung 16gb c-die 2666 @ 3600mhz cl16 | 500gb WD SN750 | 9 TB HDD | Deepcool Gammax 400 w/ 2 delta 4000rpm push pull | Antec Neo Eco Zen 500w

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45 minutes ago, KarathKasun said:

Define "lots of hard drives".

 

600w is plenty for 1080/7700k.

 Three hard drives and one SSD m.2 Lots of fans and LEDs

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44 minutes ago, mlitttler89 said:

10 fans? 

Yes

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46 minutes ago, KarathKasun said:

Define "lots of hard drives".

 

600w is plenty for 1080/7700k.

It’s a  very low-quality 600 white like the cheapest I can get rated only in peak power 

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42 minutes ago, SupaKomputa said:

One drive only consume 10 watts at the most.

Even dual 1080 on SLI only consume 400 watt total.

1000 watt is way over, no problem if you have money to burn.

You'll need 4 CPU + 4 GPU to max out 1000 watt.

 Yes but is it hurting anything having one 000? I love to be forward thinking 

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41 minutes ago, ZcanKal said:

You would need SLI GTX 480's to fully utilize a 1000w PSU.

Yeah  but is it hurting anything? I want to be forward thinking and I want to overclock my GTX 1080 in the future, but I have a 1060 right now and will for the next two months 

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49 minutes ago, James Evens said:

1000W? i7, gtx 1060 depending on your OC is 200W. Let assume the 10 drives and fan is another 150W this makes 350W.

 Yes but is it hurting anything having very high wattage?

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1 hour ago, Gorge said:

 Yes but is it hurting anything having very high wattage?

This seems to be a common misconception, just because a power supply is rated to deliver 1000w (or whatever the power supply is) doesn't mean its actually sending that much power to the parts. The parts use as much power as they need. If you were shooting that much power through your pc, you mine as well invite your friends because you'll be having a cookout.

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1 hour ago, VegetableStu said:

also it might consume a bit more power than lower-wattage PSUs due to its efficiency curve (general rule of thumb is 50 to 65% the rated load is where a good PSU is the most

peak effiecny is around there but most of the time your system will be idle (browsing, watching netflix, etc.) so efficiency below 10% is also important and here starts the problem with 80+ certification. For 80+ only the area from 10%-100% load is tested so even titanium rated psu theoretically could have at 20W load a efficiency of 50%.

 

1 hour ago, Gorge said:

 Yes but is it hurting anything having very high wattage?

Depends during normal operation you will have a few watt higher power consumption (efficiency) and in case of a failure the protections might trip to late or don't work at all. 

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2 hours ago, Gorge said:

 Yes but is it hurting anything having very high wattage?

no...

Ryzen 3600 @ 4.5ghz all cores | Asrock B550M Steel Legend | Radeon RX580 | 2x Samsung 16gb c-die 2666 @ 3600mhz cl16 | 500gb WD SN750 | 9 TB HDD | Deepcool Gammax 400 w/ 2 delta 4000rpm push pull | Antec Neo Eco Zen 500w

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14 hours ago, Gorge said:

Yeah  but is it hurting anything? I want to be forward thinking and I want to overclock my GTX 1080 in the future, but I have a 1060 right now and will for the next two months 

It is actually hurting something, the efficiency goes down.

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16 hours ago, Gorge said:

 Lots of hard drives and 10+ system fans and lots of LEDs and case fan control hub.

 I’m planning to get a GTX 1080 in the future, is the wattage to high?

 

Yeah it's stupidly high

 

the fans and leds don't draw that much, not as much as the cpu and gpu

 

and 7700K + 1080 is light on the requirements

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1 hour ago, ZcanKal said:

It is actually hurting something, the efficiency goes down.

 Besides  not being Efficient, is a damaging the components long term? 

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14 hours ago, James Evens said:

peak effiecny is around there but most of the time your system will be idle (browsing, watching netflix, etc.) so efficiency below 10% is also important and here starts the problem with 80+ certification. For 80+ only the area from 10%-100% load is tested so even titanium rated psu theoretically could have at 20W load a efficiency of 50%.

 

Depends during normal operation you will have a few watt higher power consumption (efficiency) and in case of a failure the protections might trip to late or don't work at all. 

Really?But I like it being future proofed.  Is it a bad idea though? Is it damaging components long term?

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17 minutes ago, Gorge said:

Really?But I like it being future proofed.  Is it a bad idea though? Is it damaging components long term?

no, that future-proofing thing is stupid, if you want your PSU to last get a high-quality PSU with enough wattage. Whenever ATX standards chance your PSU will be useless, even if you have a 2000W PSU

 

17 hours ago, Gorge said:

Yeah  but is it hurting anything? I want to be forward thinking and I want to overclock my GTX 1080 in the future, but I have a 1060 right now and will for the next two months 

It hurts indirectly, if you don't need the power you are going to either sacrifice quality/protections or spend a lot of money on something you don't need.

 

 

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15 hours ago, mxk. said:

This seems to be a common misconception, just because a power supply is rated to deliver 1000w (or whatever the power supply is) doesn't mean its actually sending that much power to the parts. The parts use as much power as they need. If you were shooting that much power through your pc, you mine as well invite your friends because you'll be having a cookout.

 

15 hours ago, SupaKomputa said:

no...

 

16 hours ago, VegetableStu said:

your wallet at most ._.

 

Actually yes, in case of single-rail power supplies, if there is a resistive short your PSU will keep sending power until the connectors/cables burn. It's not very likely to happen, but the risk does exist.

 

https://www.overclock.net/forum/31-power-supplies/944707-why-single-rail-not-better-than-multi-rail.html

 

Quote

OCP has limits. The higher the maximum current the OCP allows the slower its response time is. OCP is essentially instantaneous for settings up to about 30A (30 amperes of electrical current), and is still fast enough to be useful up to about 40-45A. However, past that it takes too long (more than half a second) to prevent the excessive current from damaging something.

A +12V rail of 40A equals a wattage of 480W; which is a +12V capacity typical of a decent 550W power supply. So on power supplies up to about 500-600W single rail is safe, because the +12V OCP is fast enough to be useful (assuming it HAS +12V OCP).

However, for higher wattages the OCP will be too slow to protect anything. And also at higher wattages the amount of current the PSU can provide before the OPP (over power protection) cuts in is much higher as well.

 

Also, if you are buying a higher wattage unit for the same amount of money as other unit you may be getting worse quality/efficiency/noise levels/functionality. So it hurts indirectly in this case.

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2 hours ago, 17030644 said:

no, that future-proofing thing is stupid, if you want your PSU to last get a high-quality PSU with enough wattage. Whenever ATX standards chance your PSU will be useless, even if you have a 2000W PSU

 

It hurts indirectly, if you don't need the power you are going to either sacrifice quality/protections or spend a lot of money on something you don't need.

 

 

How does it hurt in directly? I’m not talking about the power socket or outlet I’m talking about computer components only long-termHow does it hurt in directly? I’m not talking about the power socket or outlet I’m talking about computer components only long-term

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1 minute ago, Gorge said:

How does it hurt in directly? I’m not talking about the power socket or outlet I’m talking about computer components only long-termHow does it hurt in directly? I’m not talking about the power socket or outlet I’m talking about computer components only long-term

check the comment above yours I explain there

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2 hours ago, 17030644 said:

no, that future-proofing thing is stupid, if you want your PSU to last get a high-quality PSU with enough wattage. Whenever ATX standards chance your PSU will be useless, even if you have a 2000W PSU

 

It hurts indirectly, if you don't need the power you are going to either sacrifice quality/protections or spend a lot of money on something you don't need.

 

 

It’s a EVGA supernova 1000 watt G3 

( it’s very nice)  but the wattage is way too high. Can this hurt anything?  Running it with a 1060 for hours?  I will upgrade to a 1080 in a few months   But is it safer on the 1060?

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