Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

PC randomly shuts down / fails to boot - problem with CPU (7700k) ?

Fleelive
 Share

I'm at a bit of a loss with some computer issues I've been having. After not using my PC for a week or two, it suddenly would no longer boot up. Pressing the power button did nothing. After opening it up and reconnecting some wires, the system fired up but simply shut off within minutes. This problem has persisted for 2 weeks now and I'm suspecting it's the CPU even though that is supposedly one of the least likely parts to fail. I would really like some input on this as I'm pretty desperate at this point and would like some more certainty before contacting Intel for an RMA.
 
The specs: i7 7700k, MSI Z270 SLI Plus motherboard, KFA2 FTX 1080 GPU, Corsair Vengeance LPX 2x8GB RAM, Cooler Master v550 PSU, Samsung Evo 850 SSD.
 
Things I have tried:
  • Different outlets around the house and another power chord
  • Cleaned the case and components with compressed air
  • Replaced the PSU with a brand new one (Corsair RM650x) as well as all internal power cables
  • Reset the CMOS, removed mobo battery and updated the BIOS to the most recent version
  • Tried all possible RAM configurations (just 1 stick, both in different slots...) as well as 2 new modules (G-Skill Ripjaw V)
  • Replaced the entire Motherboard with a brand new one of the same model
  • Reconnected all components, reseated the CPU and reapplied thermal paste
  • Replaced the GPU with a friend's Asus GTX 970
  • Ran the system without the GPU connected and just on the integrated graphics (this seemed to work but after having the system crash with the GPU and immediately removing it, it shut down again even on the iGPU)
  • Ran the system without the case power switch / reset cables attached to rule out faulty wiring
  • Idled in the BIOS screen after a crash without even the SSD/HDD with the OS on attached
  • Did several stress tests such as AIDA64 and OCCT as well as a variety of Windows and 3rd party diagnostics tools (the PC either crashes or diagnostics comes back clean)
  • Monitored the system with MSI Afterburner and checked logs to rule out temperature issues (highest temp recorded was 72° in the CPU after extended stress testing at 100% use)
  • Checked Event Viewer (nothing in particular stands out)
  • Tweaked Windows power settings, disabled fast boot, disabled restart on failure
  • Replaced the CPU with an identical brand new one (7700k)
  • Ran the PC at a different house to rule out power problems at my place
  • Ran the internals out of the case to rule out short circuits by touching the case or something
 
In other words, I've replaced all components other than the CPU (temporarily, just to see if the system still crashed) including the PSU, GPU, Motherboard and RAM. I've verified that the crash happens even in BIOS without an SSD with the OS on attached. The CPU seems to be the only possible culprit here, and this seems confirmed by the Intel Processor Diagnostics Tool always crashing the system during the stress test / check. It seems that the system runs stable after not being used for a few hours up until it comes under load. When it then shuts off the first time, it often doesn't make it past BIOS again or will crash just idling on the desktop when you reboot it immediately after.
I'm planning on having it RMA'd by Intel but am still baffled by what might be causing this. I've been suggested to try running it with hyperthreading or certain cores disabled so I might still do that first. I've done a fair bit of searching and didn't find much that compared to my experience other than this guy who had the issue fixed with a new CPU. Any thoughts or input would be greatly appreciated.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

It is very rare that a cpu becomes fried. Usually its the mainboard, ram or PSU. Is your PC overclocked or running at stock speeds? Try the following steps...

 

1. Unplug absolutely every cable (usb and monitor).

2. Hold power button for 30 seconds to discharge any remaining power, wait 5 then hold another 30.

3. Clear CMOS, if you do not complete steps 1 and 2, the cmos may not completely clear.

4. Enter BIOS, if you can, and select "Load Optimized Defaults" and reboot PC.

 

If the system was overclocked this will revert everything back to stock, But you'll be able to rule out stability issues. For your current setup I would recommend a PSU with more than 550w of power. I have a 750w PSU running my i5 7600k and gtx 1060.

Let me know if these steps help.

Intel Core i7 9700F / Cooler Master 212 Evo / GeForce GTX 1660 SUPER / 16 GB G.SKILL RAM @ 2666MHz / GA-B365M-DS3H / EVGA 500w PSU

HP Pavilion Gaming 15 / Ryzen 5 4600H / GeForce GTX 1050 / 8 GB @ 3200MHz

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

58 minutes ago, Brent744 said:

It is very rare that a cpu becomes fried. Usually its the mainboard, ram or PSU. Is your PC overclocked or running at stock speeds? Try the following steps...

 

1. Unplug absolutely every cable (usb and monitor).

2. Hold power button for 30 seconds to discharge any remaining power, wait 5 then hold another 30.

3. Clear CMOS, if you do not complete steps 1 and 2, the cmos may not completely clear.

 4. Enter BIOS, if you can, and select "Load Optimized Defaults" and reboot PC.

 

If the system was overclocked this will revert everything back to stock, But you'll be able to rule out stability issues. For your current setup I would recommend a PSU with more than 550w of power. I have a 750w PSU running my i5 7600k and gtx 1060.

Let me know if these steps help.

The system was not overclocked. I tried my hand at that a few months ago (tweaked some things, ran XMP and OC Genie) but decided I didn't need the performance boost and noticed some frame skips in some applications. 


Still, I followed your suggestions, cleared the CMOS and made sure the BIOS settings are all default. The system crashed again as soon as I exited the BIOS menu, so that wasn't the issue. It also wouldn't make much sense since I did that in the past and replaced the entire motherboard. I've also tried two different brand new RAM modules as well as another PSU (650w this time, which should be more than plenty). No luck either way. I made this thread because I'm honestly pretty desperate at this point.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

20 minutes ago, Fleelive said:

The system was not overclocked. I tried my hand at that a few months ago (tweaked some things, ran XMP and OC Genie) but decided I didn't need the performance boost and noticed some frame skips in some applications. 


Still, I followed your suggestions, cleared the CMOS and made sure the BIOS settings are all default. The system crashed again as soon as I exited the BIOS menu, so that wasn't the issue. It also wouldn't make much sense since I did that in the past and replaced the entire motherboard. I've also tried two different brand new RAM modules as well as another PSU (650w this time, which should be more than plenty). No luck either way. I made this thread because I'm honestly pretty desperate at this point.

Im assuming you checked to ensure all the RAM you tested were compatible with both the CPU and Motherboard? Different boards support different speeds. I cheaped out on my motherboards and cannot use DDR4 RAM that's faster than 3000MHz.

It sounds like you have already tested pretty much everything except the CPU however if you're able to boot into Windows and its not overheating, I do not believe its a CPU problem.

Try opening up the Command Prompt as Administrator and type "chkdsk", It will scan your drive for any errors. Before sending it back I would try a complete wipe of the system with DBAN and reinstall Windows so you can rule out any kind of software issues or corrupt files within the system files. These days its a fast and easy process with Microsoft's Media Creation Tool.

Intel Core i7 9700F / Cooler Master 212 Evo / GeForce GTX 1660 SUPER / 16 GB G.SKILL RAM @ 2666MHz / GA-B365M-DS3H / EVGA 500w PSU

HP Pavilion Gaming 15 / Ryzen 5 4600H / GeForce GTX 1050 / 8 GB @ 3200MHz

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

27 minutes ago, Brent744 said:

Im assuming you checked to ensure all the RAM you tested were compatible with both the CPU and Motherboard? Different boards support different speeds. I cheaped out on my motherboards and cannot use DDR4 RAM that's faster than 3000MHz.

 It sounds like you have already tested pretty much everything except the CPU however if you're able to boot into Windows and its not overheating, I do not believe its a CPU problem.

Try opening up the Command Prompt as Administrator and type "chkdsk", It will scan your drive for any errors. Before sending it back I would try a complete wipe of the system with DBAN and reinstall Windows so you can rule out any kind of software issues or corrupt files within the system files. These days its a fast and easy process with Microsoft's Media Creation Tool.

3000 and 3200MHz RAM should be supported by the 7700k and my MSI Z270 SLI Motherboard. Also, I'm not even trying to run my RAM at those speeds. You need to "unlock" the full speed in the BIOS as it by default runs at 2400 MHz. As the system still crashes at 2400, I doubt it's the RAM.

 

I'm not always able to boot into Windows. After a first crash under load, the PC will sometimes shut down within seconds of trying to boot up or get to the BIOS screen and then crash again. It even happened when I tested the system without my SDD/HDD attached.

 

I just ran the check disk tool for both of my drives (SDD with OS, HDD with files) and they both came up clean.

 

The reason I'm hesitant to completely wipe and reinstall everything is that it would take quite a bit of effort to set things back up and that I really don't see how it's a Windows problem. How could it be Windows when the PC sometimes refuses to even power up, crashes during the first seconds of booting or even shuts back off on the BIOS without any storage / OS even connected? It doesn't make any sense to me why this is happening.

 

Also, thanks for the response. I appreciate your help.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

It is definitely very strange behavior. It is displaying the same signs and symptoms of an unstable overclock, but its running at stock speeds.

 

When the Ryzen 5 2600's first launched they had a huge issue with a Windows update that caused the whole computer to crash when launching certain applications. It turns out Windows was feeding the cpu too much voltage upon launching certain things, causing the system to become unstable and ultimately crash. After a couple weeks they released another update which corrected the issue.

 

If you have enough time before it crashes try and download cpuz in order to monitor the voltage. I think it's a power problem somewhere.

Intel Core i7 9700F / Cooler Master 212 Evo / GeForce GTX 1660 SUPER / 16 GB G.SKILL RAM @ 2666MHz / GA-B365M-DS3H / EVGA 500w PSU

HP Pavilion Gaming 15 / Ryzen 5 4600H / GeForce GTX 1050 / 8 GB @ 3200MHz

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, Brent744 said:

It is definitely very strange behavior. It is displaying the same signs and symptoms of an unstable overclock, but its running at stock speeds.

  

When the Ryzen 5 2600's first launched they had a huge issue with a Windows update that caused the whole computer to crash when launching certain applications. It turns out Windows was feeding the cpu too much voltage upon launching certain things, causing the system to become unstable and ultimately crash. After a couple weeks they released another update which corrected the issue.

  

If you have enough time before it crashes try and download cpuz in order to monitor the voltage. I think it's a power problem somewhere.

Would MSI Afterburner work as well? I've got a log of system performance right up to the moment it crashed. I also have a video of the PC crashing I could put on Youtube if that might help;

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

For anyone interested, this is a screenshot of MSI Afterburner monitoring all of the PC's components just before it crashed. The reason it started spiking towards the end is that I ran the Intel Processor Diagnostics Tool.

 

7ztvQHX.png

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmmmm, I do not see anything out of the ordinary there. Seeing the cpu voltage would be nice. So as it started to become stressed under load due to the Intel Processor Diagnostics Tool, it crashed. I'm thinking it was pushing too much voltage when it became stressed and became unstable. In most cases when Windows crashes, its protecting itself from damage. Download cpuz, its an extremely light weight program that provides a lot of great information about your cpu. Try to stress the cpu again while monitoring voltage with that program.

Intel Core i7 9700F / Cooler Master 212 Evo / GeForce GTX 1660 SUPER / 16 GB G.SKILL RAM @ 2666MHz / GA-B365M-DS3H / EVGA 500w PSU

HP Pavilion Gaming 15 / Ryzen 5 4600H / GeForce GTX 1050 / 8 GB @ 3200MHz

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

We have 77 views as of now, Anyone else have any other input they can provide? Or anyone else experience anything similar?

Intel Core i7 9700F / Cooler Master 212 Evo / GeForce GTX 1660 SUPER / 16 GB G.SKILL RAM @ 2666MHz / GA-B365M-DS3H / EVGA 500w PSU

HP Pavilion Gaming 15 / Ryzen 5 4600H / GeForce GTX 1050 / 8 GB @ 3200MHz

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

23 hours ago, Fleelive said:
I'm at a bit of a loss with some computer issues I've been having. After not using my PC for a week or two, it suddenly would no longer boot up. Pressing the power button did nothing. After opening it up and reconnecting some wires, the system fired up but simply shut off within minutes. This problem has persisted for 2 weeks now and I'm suspecting it's the CPU even though that is supposedly one of the least likely parts to fail. I would really like some input on this as I'm pretty desperate at this point and would like some more certainty before contacting Intel for an RMA.
 
The specs: i7 7700k, MSI Z270 SLI Plus motherboard, KFA2 FTX 1080 GPU, Corsair Vengeance LPX 2x8GB RAM, Cooler Master v550 PSU, Samsung Evo 850 SSD.
 
Things I have tried:
  • Different outlets around the house and another power chord
  • Cleaned the case and components with compressed air
  • Replaced the PSU with a brand new one (Corsair RM650x) as well as all internal power cables
  • Reset the CMOS, removed mobo battery and updated the BIOS to the most recent version
  • Tried all possible RAM configurations (just 1 stick, both in different slots...) as well as 2 new modules (G-Skill Ripjaw V)
  • Replaced the entire Motherboard with a brand new one of the same model
  • Reconnected all components, reseated the CPU and reapplied thermal paste
  • Replaced the GPU with a friend's Asus GTX 970
  • Ran the system without the GPU connected and just on the integrated graphics (this seemed to work but after having the system crash with the GPU and immediately removing it, it shut down again even on the iGPU)
  • Ran the system without the case power switch / reset cables attached to rule out faulty wiring
  • Idled in the BIOS screen after a crash without even the SSD/HDD with the OS on attached
  • Did several stress tests such as AIDA64 and OCCT as well as a variety of Windows and 3rd party diagnostics tools (the PC either crashes or diagnostics comes back clean)
  • Monitored the system with MSI Afterburner and checked logs to rule out temperature issues (highest temp recorded was 72° in the CPU after extended stress testing at 100% use)
  • Checked Event Viewer (nothing in particular stands out)
  • Tweaked Windows power settings, disabled fast boot, disabled restart on failure
 
In other words, I've replaced all components other than the CPU (temporarily, just to see if the system still crashed) including the PSU, GPU, Motherboard and RAM. I've verified that the crash happens even in BIOS without an SSD with the OS on attached. The CPU seems to be the only possible culprit here, and this seems confirmed by the Intel Processor Diagnostics Tool always crashing the system during the stress test / check. It seems that the system runs stable after not being used for a few hours up until it comes under load. When it then shuts off the first time, it often doesn't make it past BIOS again or will crash just idling on the desktop when you reboot it immediately after.
I'm planning on having it RMA'd by Intel but am still baffled by what might be causing this. I've been suggested to try running it with hyperthreading or certain cores disabled so I might still do that first. I've done a fair bit of searching and didn't find much that compared to my experience other than this guy who had the issue fixed with a new CPU. Any thoughts or input would be greatly appreciated.

Have you tried reseating the CPU? Maybe one of the pins isn't making contact.

 

Drivers could be the cause of issues also.

Main PC:

CPU: Intel Core i9 12900KS

P-Cores: 5.8Ghz - 3 cores 5.5Ghz - 5 cores.

E-Cores: 4.4Ghz - 8 cores.

CPU Voltage: 1.35V 

Cooled by 

Optimus Signature V2 Copper Nickel CPU Block.

Motherboard: Z690 ASUS Maximus Formula.

RAM: GSkill 2x16GB DDRt 6400Mhz CL32 Kit OC 6800Mhz CL30 1.5V.

GPU: ASUS RTX 3090 Strix (KPN 1000W BIOS) With EKWB Quantum RGB Block and RGB Active backplate from EK.

Case: My own case fabricated out of aluminium and wood.

Storage: 2x 2TB Sarbent Rocket Plus Gen 4.0 NVMe, 1x 1TB Samsung 981a NVMe, 1x External 2TB Seagate Barracuda (Backup).

WiFi: AX210 WiFi 6 Tri-Band card module.

PSU: Corsair AX1600i with custom black and red cables.

Display: Samsung Oddysey G9 240Hz Ver. 5120x1440 with G-Sync and Freesync Premium Pro 1008 Firmware Ver, and 1x Electriq USB C 1080p 15'8 inch IPS portable display for temperature and stats.

Fan Controllers: 5x AquaComputer Octo with 5 temperature sensors.

Cooling: Two Custom Loops:

1st Loop: 4x 480mm XE CoolStream radiators and 1x 240mm XE Coolstream radiator with 1x Revo D5 RGB pump and 1x Rajintek Antila D5 Evo RGB pump for CPU only cooling with 2x Koolance QDC3, red coolant.

2nd Loop: 4x 480mm XE CoolStream radiators and 1x 240mm XE Coolstream radiator with 1x Revo D5 RGB pump and 1x Rajintek Antila D5 Evo RGB pump for CPU only cooling with 2x Koolance QDC3, purple coolant.

Total: 4x pumps and 10x radiators.

Keyboard: Razer BlackWidow V3 RGB - Green switches.

Sound: Logitech Z680 5.1 THX Certified 505W Speakers.

Mouse: Razer Basilisk Ultimate Wireless with charging dock.

Piano: Yamaha P155.

Phone: Oppo Find X2 Pro.

Camera: Logitech C922.

VR: Oculus Rift S.

External SSD: 256GB Overclocking OS.

Laptop: Lenovo Legion 7

R7 5800H, RTX 3080 165W 16GB GDDR6 +170 core +1000 memory, 2x32GB DDR4 3200Mhz CL22, 165Hz display 2560x1600 HDR 500nit G-SYNC + FreeSync, 4x 1TB 510 Seagate Firecuda NVMe(2x in Inateck Active enclosure), 2x 1TB Crucial P5 NVMe SSDs (2x in Inateck Active enclosure) (6TB total), 750GB portable SSDs, AX210 WiFi, with Tobii facial locking security camera, and 3x External 240GB SSDs, and 6x Electriq 1080P IPS USB-C 15'8 inch portable displays (only 2 in use).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, TheNaitsyrk said:

Have you tried reseating the CPU? Maybe one of the pins isn't making contact.

 

Drivers could be the cause of issues also.

Hey, thanks for the response. I have reseated the CPU and reapplied thermal paste when I replaced the entire motherboard. There was no visible damage on the CPU or the socket.

 

I'm not sure how it could be a driver issue when the system sometimes shuts down before it's even out of BIOS. As far as I understand, drivers are what allow components to work with the OS. Shouldn't the PC crashing without an OS even being connected rule out drivers?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, Brent744 said:

Hmmmm, I do not see anything out of the ordinary there. Seeing the cpu voltage would be nice. So as it started to become stressed under load due to the Intel Processor Diagnostics Tool, it crashed. I'm thinking it was pushing too much voltage when it became stressed and became unstable. In most cases when Windows crashes, its protecting itself from damage. Download cpuz, its an extremely light weight program that provides a lot of great information about your cpu. Try to stress the cpu again while monitoring voltage with that program.

I'll follow your suggestion in a minute. What would be (un)usual voltage for the CPU?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, Brent744 said:

Hmmmm, I do not see anything out of the ordinary there. Seeing the cpu voltage would be nice. So as it started to become stressed under load due to the Intel Processor Diagnostics Tool, it crashed. I'm thinking it was pushing too much voltage when it became stressed and became unstable. In most cases when Windows crashes, its protecting itself from damage. Download cpuz, its an extremely light weight program that provides a lot of great information about your cpu. Try to stress the cpu again while monitoring voltage with that program.

Just ran the stress test with CPU-Z running. I recorded the thing on my phone. It crashed (again) during the "Maths" section of the diagnostics. The core voltage ran at around 1.2 V for almost the entire duration of the test. The moment it crashed the temperature sat at 75° and the voltage was at exactly 1.280 V. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

Since I'll be sending back one of the motherboards tomorrow and have put in an RMA request for the CPU soon, I'm going to dismantle the computer now and probably won't be able to do more tests until I get the CPU back. 

 

Advice still welcome though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmmmmm, This is a tough one. Those voltages are perfectly safe. A lot of enthusiasts will max their voltage to 1.35v, anything above that is not recommended for prolonged use (depending on temperatures). Its really unfortunate you have not been able to find the culprit of this issue.

Intel Core i7 9700F / Cooler Master 212 Evo / GeForce GTX 1660 SUPER / 16 GB G.SKILL RAM @ 2666MHz / GA-B365M-DS3H / EVGA 500w PSU

HP Pavilion Gaming 15 / Ryzen 5 4600H / GeForce GTX 1050 / 8 GB @ 3200MHz

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

48 minutes ago, Brent744 said:

Hmmmmm, This is a tough one. Those voltages are perfectly safe. A lot of enthusiasts will max their voltage to 1.35v, anything above that is not recommended for prolonged use (depending on temperatures). Its really unfortunate you have not been able to find the culprit of this issue.

Yeah, I'm really at a loss. I spent hours troubleshooting, searching online for solutions and spoke to a dozen people  on various forums as well as to people working in IT and someone who builds computers for a living. No one has been able to help and I have no clue what the problem might be. The CPU is literally the only part I haven't yet swapped out and the fact that it always crashes during the same segment of Intel's own Processor Diagnostics Tool is what's making me think that it must be the CPU (even though I'm aware of how unlikely it is for that part to fail). I just took the computer apart and inspected the processor / socket for damages again. Not a single pin is out of the ordinary and there's no smudges, dirt or damage anywhere.

 

I really hope that replacing the CPU will be the solution. I contacted Amazon and am waiting to hear back from them about the RMA / replacement. Anyways, thanks for the help. I appreciate you taking the time to try and help. I'll be sure to post an update when I've got something new to report.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

- We can rule out the PSU, because you have tried a brand new one

- We can rule out motherboard, because you have already replaced it

- We can rule out GPU, because you have replaced it.

- You have already tried new RAM.

 

That pretty much leaves the CPU, yeah... In normal circumstances these symptoms seem likely to be caused by the PSU or motherboard, but we have already ruled those out.

 

The CPU could be faulty. Only one way to know for sure: replace it and see if that fixes the problem.

 

Doesn't sound like a software / Windows / driver issue since it sometimes even fails to boot and crashes in BIOS as well. And assuming you completely reinstalled the OS when replacing motherboards... this is highly unlikely to be the cause.

 

Another thing might be that the CPU is running without a heatsink attached and overheats instantly: are you sure the heatsink is correctly making contact with the CPU and the fan is spinning? Did the heatsink come with some kind of plastic foil at the base that you forgot to remove, causing it not to dissipate heat correctly? It is a long shot, but worth asking I think.

 

Another long shot: Is the motherboard perhaps shorting out on something in the case? Making contact with something metal in the case? Is the motherboard installed on offsets correctly? Try running the system outside of the case, see if that changes anything.

 

If I were you, I would try ordering a CPU from a place with a lenient return policy (Amazon comes to mind). You can always return it if that doesn't fix the issue.

 

Good luck!

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

28 minutes ago, maartendc said:

- We can rule out the PSU, because you have tried a brand new one

- We can rule out motherboard, because you have already replaced it

- We can rule out GPU, because you have replaced it.

- You have already tried new RAM.

 

That pretty much leaves the CPU, yeah... In normal circumstances these symptoms seem likely to be caused by the PSU or motherboard, but we have already ruled those out.

 

The CPU could be faulty. Only one way to know for sure: replace it and see if that fixes the problem.

 

 Doesn't sound like a software / Windows / driver issue since it sometimes even fails to boot and crashes in BIOS as well. And assuming you completely reinstalled the OS when replacing motherboards... this is highly unlikely to be the cause.

 

Another thing might be that the CPU is running without a heatsink attached and overheats instantly: are you sure the heatsink is correctly making contact with the CPU and the fan is spinning? Did the heatsink come with some kind of plastic foil at the base that you forgot to remove, causing it not to dissipate heat correctly? It is a long shot, but worth asking I think.

 

Another long shot: Is the motherboard perhaps shorting out on something in the case? Making contact with something metal in the case? Is the motherboard installed on offsets correctly? Try running the system outside of the case, see if that changes anything.

 

If I were you, I would try ordering a CPU from a place with a lenient return policy (Amazon comes to mind). You can always return it if that doesn't fix the issue.

 

Good luck!

 

 

Thanks! Everything you've said is correct except for one thing. I never reinstalled the OS when getting a new motherboard. The motherboard I ordered was the same one from MSI (Z270 SLI Plus) as I wanted to keep the components as similar as possible to recreate the problem on different hardware. Since I've got 30 days to return the motherboard, I've treated it as just a way of troubleshooting. Since they're both the same version and model of MB, I didn't have to reinstall the OS. I doubt that would matter though as the crashes even occur without the SSD / HDD attached. Even when the system is idling on BIOS without an OS or storage device connected do the shutdowns happen, which is why I've basically ruled out software as a problem.

 

The heatsink is definitely making contact with the CPU. It's also been in use for over a year and half so I figure that something like that would've become obvious much earlier. All temps are also fine even up to the moment of crashing so I can't imagine it's a heat issue.

 

I think the motherboard is properly mounted in the case. I haven't tried running the system outside of it but have remounted it several times. It also wouldn't make much sense for the shorting to always happen at the exact same segment of the Processor Diagnostics Tool running a stresstest. I'd try to run it outside of the case but have already taken out the CPU and motherboard. I've contacted Amazon for an RMA of the CPU, so hopefully I can get a replacement part soon.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

33 minutes ago, Fleelive said:

 It also wouldn't make much sense for the shorting to always happen at the exact same segment of the Processor Diagnostics Tool running a stresstest. I'd try to run it outside of the case but have already taken out the CPU and motherboard. I've contacted Amazon for an RMA of the CPU, so hopefully I can get a replacement part soon.

I am not familiar with how the Processor Diagnostics Tool works, but from what you are saying, definitely sounds like the CPU is the problem. Replace it if it is still under warranty!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

12 minutes ago, maartendc said:

I am not familiar with how the Processor Diagnostics Tool works, but from what you are saying, definitely sounds like the CPU is the problem. Replace it if it is still under warranty!

The Processor Diagnostics Tool is an official piece of software by Intel made for stress testing CPU's and diagnosing issues. Basically, it has your processor complete a bunch of demanding and complex tasks ranging from rendering 3D simulations to calculating prime numbers and solving mathematical problems. It's supposed to check all of your cores / threads and stress features like hyperthreading. If it runs into any issues, it should display you an error message so you can find out what the problem is. Unfortunately when I do it, it just crashes. The fact that it always goes down on the exact same test / diagnosis (the "maths" section) is why I really think it's a CPU issue.

 

Anyways, it's a free tool and should only take a few minutes to complete. You can give it a try here:

 

https://downloadcenter.intel.com/download/19792/Intel-Processor-Diagnostic-Tool

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

8 minutes ago, Fleelive said:

The Processor Diagnostics Tool is an official piece of software by Intel made for stress testing CPU's and diagnosing issues. Basically, it has your processor complete a bunch of demanding and complex tasks ranging from rendering 3D simulations to calculating prime numbers and solving mathematical problems. It's supposed to check all of your cores / threads and stress features like hyperthreading. If it runs into any issues, it should display you an error message so you can find out what the problem is. Unfortunately when I do it, it just crashes. The fact that it always goes down on the exact same test / diagnosis (the "maths" section) is why I really think it's a CPU issue.

 

Anyways, it's a free tool and should only take a few minutes to complete. You can give it a try here:

 

https://downloadcenter.intel.com/download/19792/Intel-Processor-Diagnostic-Tool

Thanks for the info. Yes, definitely sounds like a CPU issue.

 

Good luck!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

Keep us posted, let us know if the CPU swap solves the issue. A good record as well for future readers who may experience a similar problem.

Intel Core i7 9700F / Cooler Master 212 Evo / GeForce GTX 1660 SUPER / 16 GB G.SKILL RAM @ 2666MHz / GA-B365M-DS3H / EVGA 500w PSU

HP Pavilion Gaming 15 / Ryzen 5 4600H / GeForce GTX 1050 / 8 GB @ 3200MHz

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, Brent744 said:

Keep us posted, let us know if the CPU swap solves the issue. A good record as well for future readers who may experience a similar problem.

A new 7700k is on its way and I'll be able to try it next week so hopefully we'll have closure then. Fingers crossed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

On 11/26/2018 at 6:14 PM, Fleelive said:
I'm at a bit of a loss with some computer issues I've been having. After not using my PC for a week or two, it suddenly would no longer boot up. Pressing the power button did nothing. After opening it up and reconnecting some wires, the system fired up but simply shut off within minutes. This problem has persisted for 2 weeks now and I'm suspecting it's the CPU even though that is supposedly one of the least likely parts to fail. I would really like some input on this as I'm pretty desperate at this point and would like some more certainty before contacting Intel for an RMA.
 
The specs: i7 7700k, MSI Z270 SLI Plus motherboard, KFA2 FTX 1080 GPU, Corsair Vengeance LPX 2x8GB RAM, Cooler Master v550 PSU, Samsung Evo 850 SSD.
 
Things I have tried:
  • Different outlets around the house and another power chord
  • Cleaned the case and components with compressed air
  • Replaced the PSU with a brand new one (Corsair RM650x) as well as all internal power cables
  • Reset the CMOS, removed mobo battery and updated the BIOS to the most recent version
  • Tried all possible RAM configurations (just 1 stick, both in different slots...) as well as 2 new modules (G-Skill Ripjaw V)
  • Replaced the entire Motherboard with a brand new one of the same model
  • Reconnected all components, reseated the CPU and reapplied thermal paste
  • Replaced the GPU with a friend's Asus GTX 970
  • Ran the system without the GPU connected and just on the integrated graphics (this seemed to work but after having the system crash with the GPU and immediately removing it, it shut down again even on the iGPU)
  • Ran the system without the case power switch / reset cables attached to rule out faulty wiring
  • Idled in the BIOS screen after a crash without even the SSD/HDD with the OS on attached
  • Did several stress tests such as AIDA64 and OCCT as well as a variety of Windows and 3rd party diagnostics tools (the PC either crashes or diagnostics comes back clean)
  • Monitored the system with MSI Afterburner and checked logs to rule out temperature issues (highest temp recorded was 72° in the CPU after extended stress testing at 100% use)
  • Checked Event Viewer (nothing in particular stands out)
  • Tweaked Windows power settings, disabled fast boot, disabled restart on failure
 
In other words, I've replaced all components other than the CPU (temporarily, just to see if the system still crashed) including the PSU, GPU, Motherboard and RAM. I've verified that the crash happens even in BIOS without an SSD with the OS on attached. The CPU seems to be the only possible culprit here, and this seems confirmed by the Intel Processor Diagnostics Tool always crashing the system during the stress test / check. It seems that the system runs stable after not being used for a few hours up until it comes under load. When it then shuts off the first time, it often doesn't make it past BIOS again or will crash just idling on the desktop when you reboot it immediately after.
I'm planning on having it RMA'd by Intel but am still baffled by what might be causing this. I've been suggested to try running it with hyperthreading or certain cores disabled so I might still do that first. I've done a fair bit of searching and didn't find much that compared to my experience other than this guy who had the issue fixed with a new CPU. Any thoughts or input would be greatly appreciated.

did u found any solution for the above problem.I have been getting the same problem for my notebook .i updated windows a week back and then it randomly turns off.after some time whenever i play games machine shuts down on its own.

specs:i77700hk.gtx1050 and model name msigl62m7rd

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share


×