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MG2R

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  1. Like
    MG2R got a reaction from Ben17 in README: How to respond to a no POST or no power up situation   
    This thread is not meant to post your problems in, please do so in a new thread.
     
    Regardless, your issue is either a broken iGPU, a broken motherboard, or a bad setting in the BIOS (there's usually a BIOS/UEFI setting that controls what GPU to use as the primary. If that's set to PCIe, that could be the source of your trouble).
  2. Like
    MG2R got a reaction from Ben17 in README: How to respond to a no POST or no power up situation   
    To elaborate a bit: you are not in danger when doing this test, as long as you touch the low voltage side of the PSU (ie the wires that plug into your components). Everything is below 50V which means it's generally safe to touch with DRY skin (touch it with your tongue and you will get a nasty zap). What could be at danger, though, is the PSU itself. If you take the wrong wires and somehow connect a yellow (12V) or red (5V) wire to a black (GND), you create a short. Most decent PSUs these days have shorcut protections built in, but there's always a chance you kill your PSU. If you do things right and connect green to black, there is absolutely no danger whatsoever.
  3. Like
    MG2R got a reaction from Ben17 in README: How to respond to a no POST or no power up situation   
    That link seems to work for me?
     
    Also, if your power supply doesn't use color coding on its cables, you can use this site to locate the correct pin: http://www.smpspowersupply.com/connectors-pinouts.html
  4. Like
    MG2R got a reaction from Ben17 in README: How to respond to a no POST or no power up situation   
    Sorry to hear you're having problems...
     
    Please, as mentioned in the OP, create a NEW thread for your issue. It will keep things clean, and will give you problem better visibility on the forums. Please take the advice from the OP into account, quoted:
     
     
  5. Like
    MG2R got a reaction from Ben17 in README: How to respond to a no POST or no power up situation   
    Interesting, hadn't heard of that. Got a link to a source for that info? Would love to know more about it
  6. Like
    MG2R got a reaction from Ben17 in README: How to respond to a no POST or no power up situation   
    Unless I'm misunderstanding your question, the type of power supply you have should have no impact on these steps.
  7. Like
    MG2R got a reaction from Ben17 in README: How to respond to a no POST or no power up situation   
    Please create a separate thread. Make sure you cover all the details we need, that means not only the PC specs, also what it does or doesn't do and what troubleshooting steps you've tried already.
  8. Like
    MG2R got a reaction from Ben17 in README: How to respond to a no POST or no power up situation   
    REMINDER: this thread is not to ask questions about your PC. Please create a NEW thread if you still have issues after going through this thread.
     
    So, you've put together your brand new, shining rig. You plug in the power cord and push the button. Nothing happens. What now? The answer depends on what is happening:
     
     
    The machine doesn't do anything. No beeps, LEDs or spinning fans.
    Check if your power cable is firmly plugged in on both ends (you would be surprised how many issues this resolves) Check if the power supply (PSU) has a button to cut the power to the machine. Check if this button is in the position denoted with ON or I Check if EVERY power cable is plugged in securely, reseat if necessary. Check if the power button is installed correctly (consult your motherboard manual) Try shorting out the pins you connect the power button to manually. If this powers on your system, you have a faulty power button. Check with a device of which you know that it works if the power outlet you're using is actually providing power. If this hasn't solved the problem, check if your PSU isn't dead. To do this, you can follow these steps:
    Unplug your power cord and/or flip the switch on the back of the PSU in the position denoted with OFF or 0 Unplug every connector coming from your PSU (this is very important) Using a bent paperclip, short out the green wire on the 24 pin header with any of the black wires, like so. If you have a PSU that shuts down its fan under low load, or a PSU that is fanless, connect something small like a hard drive to it. Plug in your power cord and/or flip the switch on the back of the PSU in the position denoted with ON or I If the PSU does NOT power on (the fan/hard drive you connected should start spinning) after following these steps, your PSU is in all likelyhood defective. Request an RMA.
    If the PSU DOES power on, then the problem is most likely your motherboard.
     
     
    The machine does power up, but my screen remains black (no POST).
    Make sure your BIOS version is compatible with the CPU generation you're trying to run in your motherboard, you can consult the manual or the manufacturer's website about this. Check if EVERY power cable is connected. Auxiliary power connectors included. Make sure the cable coming from your monitor is attached securely to the graphics card. Also make sure it is securely attached to the monitor itself. Make sure your PSU is powerful enough to power your complete system. Make sure your monitor works by testing it on a different computer. If you have both a dedicated GPU and an iGPU, try your monitor on both the outputs on the graphics cards as well as on the motherboard. Make sure all connectors and cables are plugged in securely, reseat if necessary. Make sure your RAM, CPU and GPU are plugged in securely, reseat if necessary. If the motherboard you're using has debug LEDs, check the error code and consult the motherboard manual to see what it means. If you have a debug speaker connected to the motherboard, note the beep sequence and consult the motherboard manual or this thread to see what it means. Try clearing your CMOS. Try booting your computer with only a motherboard, CPU and one stick of RAM attached (if you don't have an iGPU, plug in your GPU as well ;) ). Make sure your GPU works (if you have a dedicated one), try it in another computer. Make sure your RAM works, try it another computer. Make sure the RAM is compatible with your CPU and your motherboard.  
    If the PC still doesn't POST after this, create a new thread and, as explained here, post IN FULL DETAIL about your problem. Make sure you include the following:
    System configuration Troubleshooting steps you already did Any additional information that may be relevant.  
    Lastly, if you find any mistakes/grammatical errors, inaccuracies or missing steps in this post, please do post them in a comment so I can fix it.
     
     
    PS: @TheXDS has posted how you can do some more in depth checking of the internal circuitry of you PSU. The only thing you need is a multimeter or potentiometer (if you're oldschool :D). You can find his post at http://linustechtips.com/main/topic/42440-readme-how-to-respond-to-a-no-post-or-no-power-up-situation/?p=4561958
  9. Like
    MG2R got a reaction from Pascal... in README: How to respond to a no POST or no power up situation   
    REMINDER: this thread is not to ask questions about your PC. Please create a NEW thread if you still have issues after going through this thread.
     
    So, you've put together your brand new, shining rig. You plug in the power cord and push the button. Nothing happens. What now? The answer depends on what is happening:
     
     
    The machine doesn't do anything. No beeps, LEDs or spinning fans.
    Check if your power cable is firmly plugged in on both ends (you would be surprised how many issues this resolves) Check if the power supply (PSU) has a button to cut the power to the machine. Check if this button is in the position denoted with ON or I Check if EVERY power cable is plugged in securely, reseat if necessary. Check if the power button is installed correctly (consult your motherboard manual) Try shorting out the pins you connect the power button to manually. If this powers on your system, you have a faulty power button. Check with a device of which you know that it works if the power outlet you're using is actually providing power. If this hasn't solved the problem, check if your PSU isn't dead. To do this, you can follow these steps:
    Unplug your power cord and/or flip the switch on the back of the PSU in the position denoted with OFF or 0 Unplug every connector coming from your PSU (this is very important) Using a bent paperclip, short out the green wire on the 24 pin header with any of the black wires, like so. If you have a PSU that shuts down its fan under low load, or a PSU that is fanless, connect something small like a hard drive to it. Plug in your power cord and/or flip the switch on the back of the PSU in the position denoted with ON or I If the PSU does NOT power on (the fan/hard drive you connected should start spinning) after following these steps, your PSU is in all likelyhood defective. Request an RMA.
    If the PSU DOES power on, then the problem is most likely your motherboard.
     
     
    The machine does power up, but my screen remains black (no POST).
    Make sure your BIOS version is compatible with the CPU generation you're trying to run in your motherboard, you can consult the manual or the manufacturer's website about this. Check if EVERY power cable is connected. Auxiliary power connectors included. Make sure the cable coming from your monitor is attached securely to the graphics card. Also make sure it is securely attached to the monitor itself. Make sure your PSU is powerful enough to power your complete system. Make sure your monitor works by testing it on a different computer. If you have both a dedicated GPU and an iGPU, try your monitor on both the outputs on the graphics cards as well as on the motherboard. Make sure all connectors and cables are plugged in securely, reseat if necessary. Make sure your RAM, CPU and GPU are plugged in securely, reseat if necessary. If the motherboard you're using has debug LEDs, check the error code and consult the motherboard manual to see what it means. If you have a debug speaker connected to the motherboard, note the beep sequence and consult the motherboard manual or this thread to see what it means. Try clearing your CMOS. Try booting your computer with only a motherboard, CPU and one stick of RAM attached (if you don't have an iGPU, plug in your GPU as well ;) ). Make sure your GPU works (if you have a dedicated one), try it in another computer. Make sure your RAM works, try it another computer. Make sure the RAM is compatible with your CPU and your motherboard.  
    If the PC still doesn't POST after this, create a new thread and, as explained here, post IN FULL DETAIL about your problem. Make sure you include the following:
    System configuration Troubleshooting steps you already did Any additional information that may be relevant.  
    Lastly, if you find any mistakes/grammatical errors, inaccuracies or missing steps in this post, please do post them in a comment so I can fix it.
     
     
    PS: @TheXDS has posted how you can do some more in depth checking of the internal circuitry of you PSU. The only thing you need is a multimeter or potentiometer (if you're oldschool :D). You can find his post at http://linustechtips.com/main/topic/42440-readme-how-to-respond-to-a-no-post-or-no-power-up-situation/?p=4561958
  10. Like
    MG2R got a reaction from OBT_ in LTT Storage Rankings   
    I don't have 10+TB yet, but I still want to show off my home made NAS :D
     
    You can find the full build log here.
     
    Hardware
    Motherboard: ASUS P8H77-I CPU: Pentium G1620 CPU cooler: Noctua NH-D14 GPU: Radeon HD 6450 RAM: 2GB no brand DDR3 1066MHz PSU: Corsair CX430M Boot drive: Kinston SSDNow V+200 60GB Storage drives: 2x2TB WDC Green (WD20EARX) Storage drive: 1x2TB WDC Green (WD20EARS) Storage drive: 1x2TB Seagate Barracuda (ST2000DM001) Case: K'nex revision 3.0 Total capacity: 8TB (raw), 6TB useable
     
     
    Software and Configuration:
    Running Debian Squeeze headless. I have the drives configured as a software RAID5. mdadm serves as the software RAID controller.
     
    Usage:
    Personal NAS, web server, cloud storage server, linux experiment box, [any other use cases I might end up trying]...
    Right now, I have about 1.5TB of data on it (mostly media).
    I'm going to start mining LiteCoins as an experiment at the end of this month (hence the GPU).
    This thing sits in my bedroom and needs to be absolutely SILENT at night. That's why I put the giant Noctua cooler on there and that's why I put a Noctua fan inside my PSU. (link in signature)
     
     
    Backup:
    All documents (so no media) are being synced to a rented VPS in Amsterdam. I use Bittorrent Sync to achieve this. All documents are also synced to my laptop. Even if my house catches on fire and I lose my laptop, desktop and server; all the important files are still secure.
     
     
    Photos:


  11. Like
    MG2R got a reaction from The_Prycer in README: How to respond to a no POST or no power up situation   
    REMINDER: this thread is not to ask questions about your PC. Please create a NEW thread if you still have issues after going through this thread.
     
    So, you've put together your brand new, shining rig. You plug in the power cord and push the button. Nothing happens. What now? The answer depends on what is happening:
     
     
    The machine doesn't do anything. No beeps, LEDs or spinning fans.
    Check if your power cable is firmly plugged in on both ends (you would be surprised how many issues this resolves) Check if the power supply (PSU) has a button to cut the power to the machine. Check if this button is in the position denoted with ON or I Check if EVERY power cable is plugged in securely, reseat if necessary. Check if the power button is installed correctly (consult your motherboard manual) Try shorting out the pins you connect the power button to manually. If this powers on your system, you have a faulty power button. Check with a device of which you know that it works if the power outlet you're using is actually providing power. If this hasn't solved the problem, check if your PSU isn't dead. To do this, you can follow these steps:
    Unplug your power cord and/or flip the switch on the back of the PSU in the position denoted with OFF or 0 Unplug every connector coming from your PSU (this is very important) Using a bent paperclip, short out the green wire on the 24 pin header with any of the black wires, like so. If you have a PSU that shuts down its fan under low load, or a PSU that is fanless, connect something small like a hard drive to it. Plug in your power cord and/or flip the switch on the back of the PSU in the position denoted with ON or I If the PSU does NOT power on (the fan/hard drive you connected should start spinning) after following these steps, your PSU is in all likelyhood defective. Request an RMA.
    If the PSU DOES power on, then the problem is most likely your motherboard.
     
     
    The machine does power up, but my screen remains black (no POST).
    Make sure your BIOS version is compatible with the CPU generation you're trying to run in your motherboard, you can consult the manual or the manufacturer's website about this. Check if EVERY power cable is connected. Auxiliary power connectors included. Make sure the cable coming from your monitor is attached securely to the graphics card. Also make sure it is securely attached to the monitor itself. Make sure your PSU is powerful enough to power your complete system. Make sure your monitor works by testing it on a different computer. If you have both a dedicated GPU and an iGPU, try your monitor on both the outputs on the graphics cards as well as on the motherboard. Make sure all connectors and cables are plugged in securely, reseat if necessary. Make sure your RAM, CPU and GPU are plugged in securely, reseat if necessary. If the motherboard you're using has debug LEDs, check the error code and consult the motherboard manual to see what it means. If you have a debug speaker connected to the motherboard, note the beep sequence and consult the motherboard manual or this thread to see what it means. Try clearing your CMOS. Try booting your computer with only a motherboard, CPU and one stick of RAM attached (if you don't have an iGPU, plug in your GPU as well ;) ). Make sure your GPU works (if you have a dedicated one), try it in another computer. Make sure your RAM works, try it another computer. Make sure the RAM is compatible with your CPU and your motherboard.  
    If the PC still doesn't POST after this, create a new thread and, as explained here, post IN FULL DETAIL about your problem. Make sure you include the following:
    System configuration Troubleshooting steps you already did Any additional information that may be relevant.  
    Lastly, if you find any mistakes/grammatical errors, inaccuracies or missing steps in this post, please do post them in a comment so I can fix it.
     
     
    PS: @TheXDS has posted how you can do some more in depth checking of the internal circuitry of you PSU. The only thing you need is a multimeter or potentiometer (if you're oldschool :D). You can find his post at http://linustechtips.com/main/topic/42440-readme-how-to-respond-to-a-no-post-or-no-power-up-situation/?p=4561958
  12. Agree
    MG2R got a reaction from 1uk34dd0 in README: How to respond to a no POST or no power up situation   
    REMINDER: this thread is not to ask questions about your PC. Please create a NEW thread if you still have issues after going through this thread.
     
    So, you've put together your brand new, shining rig. You plug in the power cord and push the button. Nothing happens. What now? The answer depends on what is happening:
     
     
    The machine doesn't do anything. No beeps, LEDs or spinning fans.
    Check if your power cable is firmly plugged in on both ends (you would be surprised how many issues this resolves) Check if the power supply (PSU) has a button to cut the power to the machine. Check if this button is in the position denoted with ON or I Check if EVERY power cable is plugged in securely, reseat if necessary. Check if the power button is installed correctly (consult your motherboard manual) Try shorting out the pins you connect the power button to manually. If this powers on your system, you have a faulty power button. Check with a device of which you know that it works if the power outlet you're using is actually providing power. If this hasn't solved the problem, check if your PSU isn't dead. To do this, you can follow these steps:
    Unplug your power cord and/or flip the switch on the back of the PSU in the position denoted with OFF or 0 Unplug every connector coming from your PSU (this is very important) Using a bent paperclip, short out the green wire on the 24 pin header with any of the black wires, like so. If you have a PSU that shuts down its fan under low load, or a PSU that is fanless, connect something small like a hard drive to it. Plug in your power cord and/or flip the switch on the back of the PSU in the position denoted with ON or I If the PSU does NOT power on (the fan/hard drive you connected should start spinning) after following these steps, your PSU is in all likelyhood defective. Request an RMA.
    If the PSU DOES power on, then the problem is most likely your motherboard.
     
     
    The machine does power up, but my screen remains black (no POST).
    Make sure your BIOS version is compatible with the CPU generation you're trying to run in your motherboard, you can consult the manual or the manufacturer's website about this. Check if EVERY power cable is connected. Auxiliary power connectors included. Make sure the cable coming from your monitor is attached securely to the graphics card. Also make sure it is securely attached to the monitor itself. Make sure your PSU is powerful enough to power your complete system. Make sure your monitor works by testing it on a different computer. If you have both a dedicated GPU and an iGPU, try your monitor on both the outputs on the graphics cards as well as on the motherboard. Make sure all connectors and cables are plugged in securely, reseat if necessary. Make sure your RAM, CPU and GPU are plugged in securely, reseat if necessary. If the motherboard you're using has debug LEDs, check the error code and consult the motherboard manual to see what it means. If you have a debug speaker connected to the motherboard, note the beep sequence and consult the motherboard manual or this thread to see what it means. Try clearing your CMOS. Try booting your computer with only a motherboard, CPU and one stick of RAM attached (if you don't have an iGPU, plug in your GPU as well ;) ). Make sure your GPU works (if you have a dedicated one), try it in another computer. Make sure your RAM works, try it another computer. Make sure the RAM is compatible with your CPU and your motherboard.  
    If the PC still doesn't POST after this, create a new thread and, as explained here, post IN FULL DETAIL about your problem. Make sure you include the following:
    System configuration Troubleshooting steps you already did Any additional information that may be relevant.  
    Lastly, if you find any mistakes/grammatical errors, inaccuracies or missing steps in this post, please do post them in a comment so I can fix it.
     
     
    PS: @TheXDS has posted how you can do some more in depth checking of the internal circuitry of you PSU. The only thing you need is a multimeter or potentiometer (if you're oldschool :D). You can find his post at http://linustechtips.com/main/topic/42440-readme-how-to-respond-to-a-no-post-or-no-power-up-situation/?p=4561958
  13. Informative
    MG2R reacted to JZStudios in Looking for A/V receiver and speaker setup   
    I have the RX-V379, and I agree. It has enough power for reasonable (and a little less reasonable) volumes, the software/interface on it is fantastic, and has all sorts of features and supports. It's been replaced with the current gen that does 4k HDR passthrough n' whatnot, but as a base I'm very happy with mine.
    Bought it on sale at Best Buy for $360 which included some small yet decent NS-P40 5.1 speakers.
    The NS-P40 are only slightly larger than your average PC speakers, for having a decent volume output and audio quality. They also weigh only slightly over a pound, so they're exceptionally light. You can mount them anywhere. I have mine set up around my PC. Fairly cheap too. Sub isn't amazing.
     
    Just as an... addendum and shilling for Yamaha some more, my brother got a different AVR against my advice in a similar price range because it has a whole 5 watts more power. I think it's a Denon and he constantly has issues with it, and the software on it sucks. The Yamaha software has it's options displayed clearly on both the AVR and the monitor/TV it's hooked up to. It's REALLY nice. You can also access the controls and settings if for whatever reason the remote breaks.
    Talking about mixing and matching, the Yamaha has built-in EQ settings for each individual speaker, along with settings for speaker placements and other stuff. My brothers AVR has none of that. It'll also auto-recognize the type of connection plugged into it and rename that channel. No more hooking up your Xbox to the "Cable" channel, It'll read and display it as Xbox One, PS4, etc. Even if it doesn't you can go in the menu and rename or skip inputs.
    I'm pretty sure they made the software for their high end models, and just use it on everything. I just don't think/know if it supports ARC, but my brothers certainly doesn't, so if that's a must have, I'd look into that too. But the Yamaha has 4 color coded memory buttons you can use to swap to other inputs and automatically apply whatever settings you have on them.
     
    So before you buy an AVR, really fiddle with the settings menu if you can.
    Also, back to speakers, the "small" form factor really doesn't seem to be a thing. It's primarily rather "large" bookshelf speakers, and if like me you're really tight on space, those won't work. As to surrounds, it depends on what you do. Flying Traut is right, your front 3 are most important, and if you primarily watch movies well... most movies really do very little with surround sound. There might be a cool moment or two, but not during the whole movie.
    Games however, can be amazing with proper surround sound. My 2 favorite examples are Horizon Zero Dawn (I will literally just turn the game on and listen to it) and The Witcher 3.
     
    This got longer than I wanted it to be.
  14. Informative
    MG2R got a reaction from ------------- in README: How to respond to a no POST or no power up situation   
    REMINDER: this thread is not to ask questions about your PC. Please create a NEW thread if you still have issues after going through this thread.
     
    So, you've put together your brand new, shining rig. You plug in the power cord and push the button. Nothing happens. What now? The answer depends on what is happening:
     
     
    The machine doesn't do anything. No beeps, LEDs or spinning fans.
    Check if your power cable is firmly plugged in on both ends (you would be surprised how many issues this resolves) Check if the power supply (PSU) has a button to cut the power to the machine. Check if this button is in the position denoted with ON or I Check if EVERY power cable is plugged in securely, reseat if necessary. Check if the power button is installed correctly (consult your motherboard manual) Try shorting out the pins you connect the power button to manually. If this powers on your system, you have a faulty power button. Check with a device of which you know that it works if the power outlet you're using is actually providing power. If this hasn't solved the problem, check if your PSU isn't dead. To do this, you can follow these steps:
    Unplug your power cord and/or flip the switch on the back of the PSU in the position denoted with OFF or 0 Unplug every connector coming from your PSU (this is very important) Using a bent paperclip, short out the green wire on the 24 pin header with any of the black wires, like so. If you have a PSU that shuts down its fan under low load, or a PSU that is fanless, connect something small like a hard drive to it. Plug in your power cord and/or flip the switch on the back of the PSU in the position denoted with ON or I If the PSU does NOT power on (the fan/hard drive you connected should start spinning) after following these steps, your PSU is in all likelyhood defective. Request an RMA.
    If the PSU DOES power on, then the problem is most likely your motherboard.
     
     
    The machine does power up, but my screen remains black (no POST).
    Make sure your BIOS version is compatible with the CPU generation you're trying to run in your motherboard, you can consult the manual or the manufacturer's website about this. Check if EVERY power cable is connected. Auxiliary power connectors included. Make sure the cable coming from your monitor is attached securely to the graphics card. Also make sure it is securely attached to the monitor itself. Make sure your PSU is powerful enough to power your complete system. Make sure your monitor works by testing it on a different computer. If you have both a dedicated GPU and an iGPU, try your monitor on both the outputs on the graphics cards as well as on the motherboard. Make sure all connectors and cables are plugged in securely, reseat if necessary. Make sure your RAM, CPU and GPU are plugged in securely, reseat if necessary. If the motherboard you're using has debug LEDs, check the error code and consult the motherboard manual to see what it means. If you have a debug speaker connected to the motherboard, note the beep sequence and consult the motherboard manual or this thread to see what it means. Try clearing your CMOS. Try booting your computer with only a motherboard, CPU and one stick of RAM attached (if you don't have an iGPU, plug in your GPU as well ;) ). Make sure your GPU works (if you have a dedicated one), try it in another computer. Make sure your RAM works, try it another computer. Make sure the RAM is compatible with your CPU and your motherboard.  
    If the PC still doesn't POST after this, create a new thread and, as explained here, post IN FULL DETAIL about your problem. Make sure you include the following:
    System configuration Troubleshooting steps you already did Any additional information that may be relevant.  
    Lastly, if you find any mistakes/grammatical errors, inaccuracies or missing steps in this post, please do post them in a comment so I can fix it.
     
     
    PS: @TheXDS has posted how you can do some more in depth checking of the internal circuitry of you PSU. The only thing you need is a multimeter or potentiometer (if you're oldschool :D). You can find his post at http://linustechtips.com/main/topic/42440-readme-how-to-respond-to-a-no-post-or-no-power-up-situation/?p=4561958
  15. Like
    MG2R got a reaction from Bada in Howto: create your own linux home server using Debian   
    Warning: Debian 8 just rolled out with systemd. Because of this, there may be stuff in this guide which doesn't work as described. This guide was written for Debian 7. Most of it should still work though...
     
    As promised before to a few forum members. This will be my beginner's howto about creating your own home server. This howto is supposed to be understandle by non-linux users and beginners. You will have to have a basic knowledge of what a computer is, what files and folders/directories are. You'll need basic knowledge of networking (knowing how to connect computers to a router and knowing what an IP-address is, is enough). You also need to be aware of the difference between a GUI (e.g. windows) and a CLI (e.g. MSDOS). If you don't know the last one: try the following. Press windowsflag+r, this should open a screen which lets you enter a command. In this screen, type 'cmd' without quotes and click OK. This will open a command prompt. That a Command Line Interface (CLI), there are no windows, there is no cursor, there is only text :D

    I'll be covering and explaining everything I do on my server. Because my server will have to be in a different place as yours and will have different name, you should always substitute the following:
    simon, with your own user name brol3, with your own server name 192.168.1.150 with the IP-address of your server  
    This will be a howto for a headless server, meaning that no monitor, nor a keyboard will be connected to the server during normal operation. Only during installation you'll need a monitor and keyboard. Because of this, I chose a CLI installation of Debian, I don't need any GUI (graphical user interface).

    I'll be putting the topics I'll be covering into different posts (comments) and linking to those in the list below, that way this doesn't turn into a MASSIVE single post.
    Installing base system Logging in for the first time Linux basics Setting console resolution Setting up a static IP Installing SSH and other handy dandy utilities Creating a RAID volume Creating (+formatting) regular partitions Creating (+formatting) encrypted partitions Mount a partition at boot Set up a file server (windows shares) Installing a web server Making your webserver secure (HTTPS) Installing phpsysinfo Setting up personal cloud storage Setting up Webmin Setting up SABnzbd+ (usenet client) Setting up Virtual Machines (Virtualbox + phpVirtualBox) Setting up a torrent client (Transmission) Keep in mind that I'm NOT an expert, I'm simply a very interested guy that did a lot of googling and fiddling since he was 12. If anything isn't clear, or if you feel like there's something wrong with what I'm doing/explaining, please feel free to tell me and I'll do my best to simplify/correct/adapt what I've written.

    I hope this helps someone.

    PS: this is a work in continuous construction. The topic list above may always expand and my howto below may always change as I find other ways to do things.If you feel like something is missing, feel free to post suggestions.
    PPS: for those interested, you can find the build log of this server here
  16. Informative
    MG2R got a reaction from Swof in README: How to respond to a no POST or no power up situation   
    REMINDER: this thread is not to ask questions about your PC. Please create a NEW thread if you still have issues after going through this thread.
     
    So, you've put together your brand new, shining rig. You plug in the power cord and push the button. Nothing happens. What now? The answer depends on what is happening:
     
     
    The machine doesn't do anything. No beeps, LEDs or spinning fans.
    Check if your power cable is firmly plugged in on both ends (you would be surprised how many issues this resolves) Check if the power supply (PSU) has a button to cut the power to the machine. Check if this button is in the position denoted with ON or I Check if EVERY power cable is plugged in securely, reseat if necessary. Check if the power button is installed correctly (consult your motherboard manual) Try shorting out the pins you connect the power button to manually. If this powers on your system, you have a faulty power button. Check with a device of which you know that it works if the power outlet you're using is actually providing power. If this hasn't solved the problem, check if your PSU isn't dead. To do this, you can follow these steps:
    Unplug your power cord and/or flip the switch on the back of the PSU in the position denoted with OFF or 0 Unplug every connector coming from your PSU (this is very important) Using a bent paperclip, short out the green wire on the 24 pin header with any of the black wires, like so. If you have a PSU that shuts down its fan under low load, or a PSU that is fanless, connect something small like a hard drive to it. Plug in your power cord and/or flip the switch on the back of the PSU in the position denoted with ON or I If the PSU does NOT power on (the fan/hard drive you connected should start spinning) after following these steps, your PSU is in all likelyhood defective. Request an RMA.
    If the PSU DOES power on, then the problem is most likely your motherboard.
     
     
    The machine does power up, but my screen remains black (no POST).
    Make sure your BIOS version is compatible with the CPU generation you're trying to run in your motherboard, you can consult the manual or the manufacturer's website about this. Check if EVERY power cable is connected. Auxiliary power connectors included. Make sure the cable coming from your monitor is attached securely to the graphics card. Also make sure it is securely attached to the monitor itself. Make sure your PSU is powerful enough to power your complete system. Make sure your monitor works by testing it on a different computer. If you have both a dedicated GPU and an iGPU, try your monitor on both the outputs on the graphics cards as well as on the motherboard. Make sure all connectors and cables are plugged in securely, reseat if necessary. Make sure your RAM, CPU and GPU are plugged in securely, reseat if necessary. If the motherboard you're using has debug LEDs, check the error code and consult the motherboard manual to see what it means. If you have a debug speaker connected to the motherboard, note the beep sequence and consult the motherboard manual or this thread to see what it means. Try clearing your CMOS. Try booting your computer with only a motherboard, CPU and one stick of RAM attached (if you don't have an iGPU, plug in your GPU as well ;) ). Make sure your GPU works (if you have a dedicated one), try it in another computer. Make sure your RAM works, try it another computer. Make sure the RAM is compatible with your CPU and your motherboard.  
    If the PC still doesn't POST after this, create a new thread and, as explained here, post IN FULL DETAIL about your problem. Make sure you include the following:
    System configuration Troubleshooting steps you already did Any additional information that may be relevant.  
    Lastly, if you find any mistakes/grammatical errors, inaccuracies or missing steps in this post, please do post them in a comment so I can fix it.
     
     
    PS: @TheXDS has posted how you can do some more in depth checking of the internal circuitry of you PSU. The only thing you need is a multimeter or potentiometer (if you're oldschool :D). You can find his post at http://linustechtips.com/main/topic/42440-readme-how-to-respond-to-a-no-post-or-no-power-up-situation/?p=4561958
  17. Agree
    MG2R got a reaction from Ben17 in README: How to respond to a no POST or no power up situation   
    Hi there, welcome to the forums!
     
    This thread isn't meant to post your PC issues in. Please create a new thread to ask about your problem. That way, the forum doesn't get cluttered as much.
     
     
    Thanks!
  18. Funny
    MG2R got a reaction from Ben17 in README: How to respond to a no POST or no power up situation   
    Error: out of space.
  19. Like
    MG2R got a reaction from Ben17 in README: How to respond to a no POST or no power up situation   
    Thanks! Fixed!
     
  20. Like
    MG2R got a reaction from Ben17 in README: How to respond to a no POST or no power up situation   
    Edited it in. Thanks!
  21. Agree
    MG2R got a reaction from Ben17 in README: How to respond to a no POST or no power up situation   
    Could be that I am mistaking myself. Added "make sure your PSU is powerful enough to power your complete system".
  22. Like
    MG2R got a reaction from Ben17 in README: How to respond to a no POST or no power up situation   
    During POST every power hungry component in your system is basically idling, so I don't think would be an issue in any system... How could I forget Clear CMOS? Thanks! Added! EDIT: clear CMOS was already in the list
  23. Like
    MG2R got a reaction from Ben17 in README: How to respond to a no POST or no power up situation   
    Every PSU will power on without a load. Some PSUs need a load of a couple of watt before their output falls within specification though. The point about the fan spinning is very valid, though. Fixing now. Fixed.
     
    Thanks for the feedback
  24. Like
    MG2R got a reaction from Bajantechnician in LTT Storage Rankings   
    I don't have 10+TB yet, but I still want to show off my home made NAS :D
     
    You can find the full build log here.
     
    Hardware
    Motherboard: ASUS P8H77-I CPU: Pentium G1620 CPU cooler: Noctua NH-D14 GPU: Radeon HD 6450 RAM: 2GB no brand DDR3 1066MHz PSU: Corsair CX430M Boot drive: Kinston SSDNow V+200 60GB Storage drives: 2x2TB WDC Green (WD20EARX) Storage drive: 1x2TB WDC Green (WD20EARS) Storage drive: 1x2TB Seagate Barracuda (ST2000DM001) Case: K'nex revision 3.0 Total capacity: 8TB (raw), 6TB useable
     
     
    Software and Configuration:
    Running Debian Squeeze headless. I have the drives configured as a software RAID5. mdadm serves as the software RAID controller.
     
    Usage:
    Personal NAS, web server, cloud storage server, linux experiment box, [any other use cases I might end up trying]...
    Right now, I have about 1.5TB of data on it (mostly media).
    I'm going to start mining LiteCoins as an experiment at the end of this month (hence the GPU).
    This thing sits in my bedroom and needs to be absolutely SILENT at night. That's why I put the giant Noctua cooler on there and that's why I put a Noctua fan inside my PSU. (link in signature)
     
     
    Backup:
    All documents (so no media) are being synced to a rented VPS in Amsterdam. I use Bittorrent Sync to achieve this. All documents are also synced to my laptop. Even if my house catches on fire and I lose my laptop, desktop and server; all the important files are still secure.
     
     
    Photos:


  25. Funny
    MG2R got a reaction from 8uhbbhu8 in LTT Storage Rankings   
    You mounted a rack server to the wall...
     
    That's what I call... vertical thinking! <yeeeeaaaaaaahhhhhhhh!!!!!.wav>
     
    Seriously though, super neat setup on that wall!
     
    EDIT: actually, how did you mount them exactly?
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