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Difference between founders edition and normal gpu

GeneralGusher
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Hi I was thinking about getting a new gpu and was wondering what the difference between an founders edition card is compared to a normal one. Any performance differences? I was also wondering if it would be a good idea to get a used gpu or if anyone k owe any good deals that there are for gpu’s?

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what are the rest of your specs? what country? what budget?

2 minutes ago, GeneralGusher said:

Any performance differences?

founders are more expensive and perform around 0-2% better.

 

QUOTE ME  FOR ANSWER.

 

Main PC:

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Tier lists for building a PC.

 

Motherboard tier list. Tier A for overclocking 5950x. Tier B for overclocking 5900x, Tier C for overclocking 5800X. Tier D for overclocking 5600X. Tier F for 4/6 core Cpus at stock. Tier E avoid.

(Also case airflow matter or if you are using Downcraft air cooler)

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Gpu tier list. Rtx 3000 and RX 6000 not included since not so many reviews. Tier S for Water cooling. Tier A and B for overcloking. Tier C stock and Tier D avoid.

( You can overclock Tier C just fine, but it can get very loud, that is why it is not recommended for overclocking, same with tier D)

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Psu tier List. Tier A for Rtx 3000, Vega and RX 6000. Tier B For anything else. Tier C cheap/IGPU. Tier D and E avoid.

(RTX 3000/ RX 6000 Might run just fine with higher wattage tier B unit, Rtx 3070 runs fine with tier B units)

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Cpu cooler tier list. Tier 1&2 for power hungry Cpus with Overclock. Tier 3&4 for overclocking Ryzen 3,5,7 or lower power Intel Cpus. Tier 5 for overclocking low end Cpus or 4/6 core Ryzen. Tier 6&7 for stock. Tier 8&9 Ryzen stock cooler performance. Do not waste your money!

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Storage tier List. Tier A for Moving files/  OS. Tier B for OS/Games. Tier C for games. Tier D budget Pcs. Tier E if on sale not the worst but not good.

(With a grain of salt, I use tier C for OS myself)

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6 minutes ago, GeneralGusher said:

Hi I was thinking about getting a new gpu and was wondering what the difference between an founders edition card is compared to a normal one. Any performance differences? I was also wondering if it would be a good idea to get a used gpu or if anyone k owe any good deals that there are for gpu’s?

Knowing your country of origin to narrow prices down to the correct currency and economy would be really helpful. Founders Edition cards are the cards that are released by Nvidia or AMD themselves, versus a custom one like an Asus ROG Strix or EVGA, MSI etc. same processors as the founders, but different PCB, different VRM and cooling solutions, different designs overall.

 

Used GPU's is a market where you really have to beware of what you are buying. Be sure to have the seller test it or provide you with test results, make sure its working and is not overheating or artifacting. Depending on the performance you want to have, you have a wide spectrum of options. For example, I live in Canada and bought my first GPU used. it was an RX570 Radeon card and I picked it up for about $150 Canadian (approx. $110 USD). Its important to ask the necessary questions of if its been refurbished, what the card was used for, take a look at the fine details like does it look clean, are there markings on the screws indicating it may have been taken apart, if so why, things like that.

CPU: Ryzen 5 2600X GPU: Reference 5700XT (Asus) Motherboard: Asus ROG Strix X470-F RAM: G.Skill Trident Z RGB 3200C16 PSU: Corsair RM850X White

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1 minute ago, GeneralGusher said:

Hi I was thinking about getting a new gpu and was wondering what the difference between an founders edition card is compared to a normal one. Any performance differences? I was also wondering if it would be a good idea to get a used gpu or if anyone k owe any good deals that there are for gpu’s?

Since you used the term 'Founders Edition', I will assume you're talking about Nvidia.

The difference between an FE card and AIB (add-in-board) card is nowadays less relevant than it was in the past.

 

In the past companies like EVGA, ASUS, etc. were allowed to 'bin' their cards. Basically they purchases chips from Nvidia, they would test these chips and the best chips would go in their most premium cards.

Since they are now allowed to do this anymore, you have an equal chance of getting a high performing (or not as high performing) chip in any videocard you buy.

 

In that sense, the only thing that matters to a card is:

- Size (if it fits in your case)

- Power connections (some don't use the default setup)

- Noise (some cards are smaller because of a 1-fan design, but also louder)

- video connections (ASUS often has 2xHDMI, 2xDP, while others have 1xHDMI, 3xDP)

- Preference (what do you think looks best/support from any company).

- Watercooling compability (some cards use a different board design)

 

On AMD, this is largely the same story, except they don't offer a Founders Card through themselves. As far as I know, they don't have a ban on 'binning', so that whole thing is less relevant on the AMD side.

"We're all in this together, might as well be friends" Tom, Toonami.

 

mini eLiXiVy: my open source 65% mechanical PCB, a build log, PCB anatomy and discussing open source licenses: https://linustechtips.com/topic/1366493-elixivy-a-65-mechanical-keyboard-build-log-pcb-anatomy-and-how-i-open-sourced-this-project/

 

mini_cardboard: a 4% keyboard build log and how keyboards workhttps://linustechtips.com/topic/1328547-mini_cardboard-a-4-keyboard-build-log-and-how-keyboards-work/

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On 4/30/2020 at 2:23 PM, minibois said:

Since you used the term 'Founders Edition', I will assume you're talking about Nvidia.

The difference between an FE card and AIB (add-in-board) card is nowadays less relevant than it was in the past.

 

In the past companies like EVGA, ASUS, etc. were allowed to 'bin' their cards. Basically they purchases chips from Nvidia, they would test these chips and the best chips would go in their most premium cards.

Since they are now allowed to do this anymore, you have an equal chance of getting a high performing (or not as high performing) chip in any videocard you buy.

 

In that sense, the only thing that matters to a card is:

- Size (if it fits in your case)

- Power connections (some don't use the default setup)

- Noise (some cards are smaller because of a 1-fan design, but also louder)

- video connections (ASUS often has 2xHDMI, 2xDP, while others have 1xHDMI, 3xDP)

- Preference (what do you think looks best/support from any company).

- Watercooling compability (some cards use a different board design)

 

On AMD, this is largely the same story, except they don't offer a Founders Card through themselves. As far as I know, they don't have a ban on 'binning', so that whole thing is less relevant on the AMD side.

 

On 4/30/2020 at 2:23 PM, CPT_BEEMO said:

Knowing your country of origin to narrow prices down to the correct currency and economy would be really helpful. Founders Edition cards are the cards that are released by Nvidia or AMD themselves, versus a custom one like an Asus ROG Strix or EVGA, MSI etc. same processors as the founders, but different PCB, different VRM and cooling solutions, different designs overall.

 

Used GPU's is a market where you really have to beware of what you are buying. Be sure to have the seller test it or provide you with test results, make sure its working and is not overheating or artifacting. Depending on the performance you want to have, you have a wide spectrum of options. For example, I live in Canada and bought my first GPU used. it was an RX570 Radeon card and I picked it up for about $150 Canadian (approx. $110 USD). Its important to ask the necessary questions of if its been refurbished, what the card was used for, take a look at the fine details like does it look clean, are there markings on the screws indicating it may have been taken apart, if so why, things like that.

 

On 4/30/2020 at 2:19 PM, SavageNeo said:

what are the rest of your specs? what country? what budget?

founders are more expensive and perform around 0-2% better.

 

ok thanks guys! I really appreciate it

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