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Is the hdplex 400 sufficient for ryzen 7 2700x

WTD3933
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Hi all,

I know the power draw of a 2700x at stock speeds is approximately 105w, but what are your experiences when overclocking. What's the expected power draw for a fairly standard overclock on that chip?

 

Given that power draw, and the power draw of a GTX 980 (about 285W under a stress test from my reading) would I have enough headroom with the hdplex 400w (peak output 500w) to overclock a 2700x and run my 980 at stock speeds/slight over clock?

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id say if you can... get a new larger PSU... it'll just be safer for the pc... but you probably could use it anyway if you needed. 

Rig 1: i7-9700k OC'd to 5.0ghz all core | EVGA XC RTX 2080Ti | ADATA DDR4 2400mhz 4x8gb | ASUS PRIME Z370-P | Asetek 550LC 120mm | ADATA 480GB SSD & Toshiba P300 3TB | Cooler Master Masterbox MB500 | Win 10 Home | Logitech G910 Orion Spectrum, G502 Proteus Spectrum, G933 Artemis Spectrum Snow Wireless Limited Edition, Corsair MM300 Mouse Pad | 2 MSI Optix Curved 27" FHD Monitors 

 

(before i sold the WD drive and MSI gpu - https://www.userbenchmark.com/UserRun/11946219 171 gaming. felt good.)

 

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RIP 

 

Rig 5 (dead and dismantled and sold) : i7-7820X OC'd to 4.8ghz all core | MSI DUKE 1080ti | ADATA DDR4 2400mhz 4x8gb | Gigabyte X299 UD4 PRO | Asetek 240mm AIO | WD Green 240gb SSD | Other various components that I can't remember

 

Rig 6 (same fate as rig 5) i7-8700k stock clocks | MSI DUKE 1080ti | ADATA DDR4 2400mhz 2x8gb | MSI Z370 A-Pro | Asetek 550LC 120mm | WD Green 240GB SSD & Toshiba 2TB HDD | Other various components that I can't Remember 

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5 minutes ago, TH3R34P3R said:

id say if you can... get a new larger PSU... it'll just be safer for the pc... but you probably could use it anyway if you needed. 

Yeah I do have the option for an sfx power supply however I'm working in an sff case so the space savings with the hdplex 400 would be helpful but yeah, if I have to I'll use an sfx psu. 

You don't happen to know of any other ultra small psu's with higher power output do you? 

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lmao nevermind yah thats a great unit, go for it

Edited by Bananasplit_00
forgot that it was actiually amazing

I spent $2500 on building my PC and all i do with it is play no games atm & watch anime at 1080p(finally) watch YT and write essays...

Builds:

The Toaster Project! Northern Bee!

 

The original LAN PC build log! (Old, dead and replaced by The Toaster Project & 5.0)

Spoiler

"Here is some advice that might have gotten lost somewhere along the way in your life. 

 

#1. Treat others as you would like to be treated.

#2. It's best to keep your mouth shut; and appear to be stupid, rather than open it and remove all doubt.

#3. There is nothing "wrong" with being wrong. Learning from a mistake can be more valuable than not making one in the first place.

 

Follow these simple rules in life, and I promise you, things magically get easier. " - MageTank 31-10-2016

 

 

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8 minutes ago, Bananasplit_00 said:

lmao nevermind yah thats a great unit, go for it

Lol

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I would say no.

 

It depends on what you're powering the power supply with.

 

The power supply says it has over 94% efficiency but it's clever enough to NOT say the efficiency on each output voltage, 3.3v, 5v and 12v, and it also doesn't say at what output power is that peak 94% efficiency reached at.

Efficiency isn't constant, it's a curve... the power supply will be most efficient at some amount of output power, and then efficiency may slightly decrease. So for example, this power supply could reach its peak efficiency at let's say 250 watts on 12v with 95% and then decrease to 92% efficiency at 400 watts.

The efficiency on 3.3v and 5v could be quite different, for example the efficiency there could peak at 88-90% only, but luckily modern computers don't use a lot of power on 3.3v and 5v. I can't find any reviews where they compute the efficiency at various outputs, and they don't have a datasheet or report saying these.

The efficiency will also vary with input voltage, the mosfets in the dc-dc converter are quite sensitive about that... they'll be less efficient depending on input voltage. 

For example, the power supply can work with 16v .. 30v but that doesn't mean the efficiency is the same with any input voltage. It could be that peak efficiency of let's say 95% is reached with 16v and 250w output on 12v. However, if you use a 24v lead-acid battery or a 18.5v laptop adapter, or a 24v industrial power supply, the efficiency could be much lower, for example it could be as low as 90% with 24v input.

Typically, the efficiency decreases with higher difference between input and output voltages.

You can sort of estimate where the peak efficiencies are by what they recommend to power this thing with, on the product page

 

plex.png.bb5675667b9018c1cfbfa7e0489df6ee.png

 

The DA330PM111 is a 19.5v 330w psu, pa-9e is 19.5v 240w, so it seems they're suggesting the best efficiency will be at around 19.5v and between 240w-330w

 

So it's important to also say how are you gonna power this power supply? You're not saying, and it's not like this power supply is gonna magically gets electricity from somewhere. It expects to be powered with 16v..30v input through a DC in jack.

 

If you use a 19.5v 330w adapter, then let's say you have 92% efficiency at it's peak output ... that means 92% will be output and 8% will be waste as heat, so out of those 330w , you only get  330 / 100 * 92 = 303w ... 27 watts are wasted as heat.

So those 303w watts have to be divided between 3.3v , 5v and 12v.

Let's say your pc consumes 3A from 3.3v, 4A from 5v and the rest from 12v:

3.3v at 90% efficiency = 3.3v x 3A = 10w ... at 90% it means 10w * 100/90 = 11w are used for 3.3v

5v at 90% efficiency = 5v x 4A = 20w ... at 90% efficiency it means 20w x 100/90 = 22w

So from your 330w adapter brick, you're left with 303w - 22w - 11w = 270 watts available on 12v ... which is 270/12 = 22.5A

 

The Ryzen 2700x probably uses around 100w at stock frequencies, but don't forget that 12v is also used by motherboard for fans, sometimes it's also used to power the memory sticks (around 5-10 watts) if they're not using the 5v rail, and your motherboard also uses 10-20 watts to power chipset, onboard sound, network, and whatever else is on the board.

So you need to reserve around 25w for the motherboard and rest of things... so you're left with 250w or less.

 

So no, without knowing what exactly you're going to use to power this thing, most likely you won't be able to run that 2700x AND a power hungry GTX 980

 

FYI , the GTX 980 goes up to around 185 watts, and GTX 980TI goes to around 240w at stock frequencies. Under stress benchmarks like furmark or others, of course the card will suck more power but during regular games the card will not hit those values. If you boost the clocks, it may.

 

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11 hours ago, mariushm said:

I would say no.

 

It depends on what you're powering the power supply with.

 

The power supply says it has over 94% efficiency but it's clever enough to NOT say the efficiency on each output voltage, 3.3v, 5v and 12v, and it also doesn't say at what output power is that peak 94% efficiency reached at.

Efficiency isn't constant, it's a curve... the power supply will be most efficient at some amount of output power, and then efficiency may slightly decrease. So for example, this power supply could reach its peak efficiency at let's say 250 watts on 12v with 95% and then decrease to 92% efficiency at 400 watts.

The efficiency on 3.3v and 5v could be quite different, for example the efficiency there could peak at 88-90% only, but luckily modern computers don't use a lot of power on 3.3v and 5v. I can't find any reviews where they compute the efficiency at various outputs, and they don't have a datasheet or report saying these.

The efficiency will also vary with input voltage, the mosfets in the dc-dc converter are quite sensitive about that... they'll be less efficient depending on input voltage. 

For example, the power supply can work with 16v .. 30v but that doesn't mean the efficiency is the same with any input voltage. It could be that peak efficiency of let's say 95% is reached with 16v and 250w output on 12v. However, if you use a 24v lead-acid battery or a 18.5v laptop adapter, or a 24v industrial power supply, the efficiency could be much lower, for example it could be as low as 90% with 24v input.

Typically, the efficiency decreases with higher difference between input and output voltages.

You can sort of estimate where the peak efficiencies are by what they recommend to power this thing with, on the product page

 

plex.png.bb5675667b9018c1cfbfa7e0489df6ee.png

 

The DA330PM111 is a 19.5v 330w psu, pa-9e is 19.5v 240w, so it seems they're suggesting the best efficiency will be at around 19.5v and between 240w-330w

 

So it's important to also say how are you gonna power this power supply? You're not saying, and it's not like this power supply is gonna magically gets electricity from somewhere. It expects to be powered with 16v..30v input through a DC in jack.

 

If you use a 19.5v 330w adapter, then let's say you have 92% efficiency at it's peak output ... that means 92% will be output and 8% will be waste as heat, so out of those 330w , you only get  330 / 100 * 92 = 303w ... 27 watts are wasted as heat.

So those 303w watts have to be divided between 3.3v , 5v and 12v.

Let's say your pc consumes 3A from 3.3v, 4A from 5v and the rest from 12v:

3.3v at 90% efficiency = 3.3v x 3A = 10w ... at 90% it means 10w * 100/90 = 11w are used for 3.3v

5v at 90% efficiency = 5v x 4A = 20w ... at 90% efficiency it means 20w x 100/90 = 22w

So from your 330w adapter brick, you're left with 303w - 22w - 11w = 270 watts available on 12v ... which is 270/12 = 22.5A

 

The Ryzen 2700x probably uses around 100w at stock frequencies, but don't forget that 12v is also used by motherboard for fans, sometimes it's also used to power the memory sticks (around 5-10 watts) if they're not using the 5v rail, and your motherboard also uses 10-20 watts to power chipset, onboard sound, network, and whatever else is on the board.

So you need to reserve around 25w for the motherboard and rest of things... so you're left with 250w or less.

 

So no, without knowing what exactly you're going to use to power this thing, most likely you won't be able to run that 2700x AND a power hungry GTX 980

 

FYI , the GTX 980 goes up to around 185 watts, and GTX 980TI goes to around 240w at stock frequencies. Under stress benchmarks like furmark or others, of course the card will suck more power but during regular games the card will not hit those values. If you boost the clocks, it may.

 

I'm aware that under a stress test the 980 will draw more power than under most real world workloads but I want to be able to power it under the worst circumstances. I appreciate the breakdown with the efficiencies, definitely opened my eyes a bit.

 

After contacting hdplex they're planning on releasing an 800W unit powered by two of their hdplex 400W ac-dc converters in a few months, but that does reduce the space savings and the potential benefits of going with this small psu. So I'll see how I go, I may wait the 2-3 months or just buy a 650w+ sfx psu.

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Hold on ... just in case you don't understand...

 

This 95$ (google says it's this much, may be more) HDPLEX 400 is just a DC-DC converter, it takes a DC voltage between 16v and 30v DC and produces all the voltages required by ATX standard.

Besides this, you also need the AC-DC brick (laptop adapter, 24v power supply, whatever) to power this thing.

 

So when they're saying they're planning on releasing a 800w powered by two, that device will probably cost twice as much and you'd still need the actual AC to DC power supply to power them. So we're talking 200$ or something like that for the internal stuff, and then you'd also need 2-3 external AC-DC power supplies to power everything.

 

A 300w laptop adapter style power supply by itself is around 100$, here's an example of a 126$ one : https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/curtis-industries/L6R300D-120-C14/364-1313-ND/8038550

Comes with the standard Mini-Fit Jr. connector (pci-e 6 pin) and i think it's wired the way the HDPLEX expects (it also has pci-e 6pin connector on it)

 

Hope you realize it can become very costly, compared to a SFX power supply.

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On 1/10/2019 at 2:18 PM, mariushm said:

Hold on ... just in case you don't understand...

 

This 95$ (google says it's this much, may be more) HDPLEX 400 is just a DC-DC converter, it takes a DC voltage between 16v and 30v DC and produces all the voltages required by ATX standard.

Besides this, you also need the AC-DC brick (laptop adapter, 24v power supply, whatever) to power this thing.

 

So when they're saying they're planning on releasing a 800w powered by two, that device will probably cost twice as much and you'd still need the actual AC to DC power supply to power them. So we're talking 200$ or something like that for the internal stuff, and then you'd also need 2-3 external AC-DC power supplies to power everything.

 

A 300w laptop adapter style power supply by itself is around 100$, here's an example of a 126$ one : https://www.digikey.com/product-detail/en/curtis-industries/L6R300D-120-C14/364-1313-ND/8038550

Comes with the standard Mini-Fit Jr. connector (pci-e 6 pin) and i think it's wired the way the HDPLEX expects (it also has pci-e 6pin connector on it)

 

Hope you realize it can become very costly, compared to a SFX power supply.

I'm aware. I think you misunderstood what i said. The HDPLEX 400W DC-ATX is a dc to dc converter but HDPLEX also sell a HDPLEX 400W AC-DC converter, the subsequent 800w model is powered by two of these AC-DC converters and one DC-DC converter that is not yet released. As for the cost i am also aware it'll be expensive. It would be a last resort but it may be unavoidable.

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