Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Intel's newest CPU's and Specter/Meltdown hardware fixes... Where are they?

Grimlakin
 Share

I've been trying to find solid information on the newest of Intel's CPU's on if they actually contain hardware fixes for these various vulnerabilities.  So far the best I have found is the most current silicone has fixes for two of the so far discovered Variants of the Specter/Meltdown vulnerabilities.

 

I suppose Intel just presumes we will all forget about this.  In honesty they have maybe 1 more year of just ordering intel because that's what we have before we investigate alternatives like AMD's EPYC Cpu's for our core infrastructure.

 

Anyone hear any more promising news out of Intel?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

You mean "Silicone Lottery?"

 

With Great Power, Comes a Great Electricity Bill

 

 

Main

Setup: Intel core i5-8400 (OC'd), MSI Z-370-A Pro, Crucial Ballistix 8GB, Be Quiet! Pure Slim, Cooler Master Masterbox Lite 5 RGB, TP-Link Wifi Adapter, ASRock RX580, Artic Silver 3.5g Thermal Paste, Logitech G105, Logitech M310, Razer Sphex V2 (Mat), EVGA 500W 80+ Silver, 1TB WD Blue, 240gb Kingston Digital

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

This from people who have no answer other than to post snide remarks. Thanks guys.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

They’re probably focusing on hardware-level fixes for the next generation processors.

 

Haven't heard of a software-level mitigation yet from them 

The Workhorse (AMD-powered custom desktop)

CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 3700X | GPU: MSI X Trio GeForce RTX 2070S | RAM: XPG Spectrix D60G 32GB DDR4-3200 | Storage: 512GB XPG SX8200P + 2TB 7200RPM Seagate Barracuda Compute | OS: Microsoft Windows 10 Pro

 

The Portable Station (Intel-powered Lenovo Yoga Slim 7i)

CPU: Intel Core i5 1135G7 | GPU: Intel Iris Xe 80CU | RAM: 16GB LPDDR4X-4267 | Storage: 512GB PCIe SSD | OS: Microsoft Windows 10 Home

 

The Communicator (Apple iPhone 13 Pro)

SoC: Apple A15 Bionic | RAM: 6GB LPDDR4X | Storage: 128GB internal w/ NVMe controller | Display: 6.1" 2532x1170 "Super Retina XDR" OLED with VRR at up to 120Hz | OS: iOS 15.1

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

Spectre affects any processor with speculative execution, including AMD processors. So let's not forget that they need to keep up with mitigating or preventing those vulnerabilities as well. I hope in the future now with AMD gaining more prominence in the server sector, that people give them as much scrutiny as they do Intel. Because it's really annoying that people find a vulnerability with modern implementations of x86 and they go "theoretically this could affect AMD processors," but nobody does a follow up to make sure.

 

As for Meltdown, Intel reported hardware fixes were implemented in Coffee Lake R (the 9th generation Core processors)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

On 12/20/2018 at 8:51 AM, Grimlakin said:

I suppose Intel just presumes we will all forget about this.

Or the more normal reason being that it's hard to fix them, like really hard. They have to almost fully resign the entire architecture of the CPU since they really on vulnerabilities that are deep seated in the core design of what makes today's CPUs faster. 

 

It will take time for every vulnerability to be mitigated, likely multiple generations. Your expectation that everything would be fixed in a single generation shows how much you don't actually unstand it. 

 

Hell even everyone's godsend AMD are unlikely to be able to fix all of their spectre vulnerabilities in Zen2

🌲🌲🌲

Judge the product by its own merits, not by the Company that created it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

On 12/19/2018 at 10:51 PM, Grimlakin said:

I've been trying to find solid information on the newest of Intel's CPU's on if they actually contain hardware fixes for these various vulnerabilities.  So far the best I have found is the most current silicon has fixes for two of the so far discovered Variants of the Specter/Meltdown vulnerabilities.

 

I suppose Intel just presumes we will all forget about this.  In honesty they have maybe 1 more year of just ordering intel because that's what we have before we investigate alternatives like AMD's EPYC Cpu's for our core infrastructure.

 

Anyone hear any more promising news out of Intel?

That's more or less all there is to know, proper hardware fixes probably won't be coming for at least another generation. With that said, most spectre/meltdown variants require hyperthreading to be enabled and the 9xxx series only has HT on the highest end chip, so technically they are safer.

Don't ask to ask, just ask... please 🤨

sudo chmod -R 000 /*

What is scaling and how does it work? Asus PB287Q unboxing! Console alternatives :D Watch Netflix with Kodi on Arch Linux Sharing folders over the internet using SSH Beginner's Guide To LTT (by iamdarkyoshi)

Sauron'stm Product Scores:

Spoiler

Just a list of my personal scores for some products, in no particular order, with brief comments. I just got the idea to do them so they aren't many for now :)

Don't take these as complete reviews or final truths - they are just my personal impressions on products I may or may not have used, summed up in a couple of sentences and a rough score. All scores take into account the unit's price and time of release, heavily so, therefore don't expect absolute performance to be reflected here.

 

-Lenovo Thinkpad X220 - [8/10]

Spoiler

A durable and reliable machine that is relatively lightweight, has all the hardware it needs to never feel sluggish and has a great IPS matte screen. Downsides are mostly due to its age, most notably the screen resolution of 1366x768 and usb 2.0 ports.

 

-Apple Macbook (2015) - [Garbage -/10]

Spoiler

From my perspective, this product has no redeeming factors given its price and the competition. It is underpowered, overpriced, impractical due to its single port and is made redundant even by Apple's own iPad pro line.

 

-OnePlus X - [7/10]

Spoiler

A good phone for the price. It does everything I (and most people) need without being sluggish and has no particularly bad flaws. The lack of recent software updates and relatively barebones feature kit (most notably the lack of 5GHz wifi, biometric sensors and backlight for the capacitive buttons) prevent it from being exceptional.

 

-Microsoft Surface Book 2 - [Garbage - -/10]

Spoiler

Overpriced and rushed, offers nothing notable compared to the competition, doesn't come with an adequate charger despite the premium price. Worse than the Macbook for not even offering the small plus sides of having macOS. Buy a Razer Blade if you want high performance in a (relatively) light package.

 

-Intel Core i7 2600/k - [9/10]

Spoiler

Quite possibly Intel's best product launch ever. It had all the bleeding edge features of the time, it came with a very significant performance improvement over its predecessor and it had a soldered heatspreader, allowing for efficient cooling and great overclocking. Even the "locked" version could be overclocked through the multiplier within (quite reasonable) limits.

 

-Apple iPad Pro - [5/10]

Spoiler

A pretty good product, sunk by its price (plus the extra cost of the physical keyboard and the pencil). Buy it if you don't mind the Apple tax and are looking for a very light office machine with an excellent digitizer. Particularly good for rich students. Bad for cheap tinkerers like myself.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Sorry I'm not talking consumer grade CPU's here but I get your point.  I'm still a fan of Hyperthreading as I think it uses more of he cores that we do have.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share


×