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Delicieuxz

Privacy search-engine company DuckDuckGo submits “The Do-Not-Track Act of 2019” to improve online privacy

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11 minutes ago, mr moose said:

That doesn't describe the internet.   The internet is maintained predominately by private business to serve both people and business.  

It's not like the MAJORITY of websites accessed on the internet and actively uploaded to and viewed by the public. /s

11 minutes ago, mr moose said:

 

I don't even know why you are trying to work that out.    No one said that was the case.

Sorry I misunderstood what you said earlier. My bad

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7 minutes ago, Mindersteve said:

It's not like the MAJORITY of websites accessed on the internet and actively uploaded to and viewed by the public. /s

Viewed by the public and being public are not the same either.  However the majority of the issue is not forums like this or even youtube (although I can foresee a lot of contention there), it is online shopping and services that are contention here.  When you log on to AMD or nvidia's site for drivers they use cookies to track your movement, when you go to amazon and ebay they use the same cookies to give you ads about the latest products from whichever site you just visited to get your drivers from.   I did not give either AMD nor ebay permission to gather information regarding what websites I have visited.  In fact with my "do not track" request I specifically asked that they don't do that. 

 

The argument appears to be that they can track you because you are in a public space, that is not true.  The argument then changed and became it is their website (ergo now no longer a public space) if you don't like it don't use it.  Which is a fallacy because nowadays you can't get driver updates on disc much less ignore 80% of the internet which continues to share their tracking data across websites.

 

So either way the argument goes the only consistent and immensely obvious condition that remains is that people are being tracked  across websites without their permission and in many cases without their knowledge.

 

 

7 minutes ago, Mindersteve said:

Sorry I misunderstood what you said earlier. My bad

That's cool. :D


QuicK and DirtY. Read the CoC it's like a guide on how not to be moron.  Also I don't have an issue with the VS series.

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On 5/12/2019 at 2:22 PM, ARikozuM said:

SOAK THE RICH!!!

 

Oh, sorry...

 

KEELAR KOOEEN

I'll note that internet access is not since ethereal human right and that the only reason it exists is because corporations can profit from it. Telling them not to track your data is as good as saying that, at your whim, they lose a big chunk of revenue. (Not that they're not completely oversaturated with cash, however...)


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5 minutes ago, Crossbred said:

I'll note that internet access is not since ethereal human right and that the only reason it exists is because corporations can profit from it. Telling them not to track your data is as good as saying that, at your whim, they lose a big chunk of revenue. (Not that they're not completely oversaturated with cash, however...)

 

Naturally lost revenue from the cessation of any type of data tracking will ultimately increase the cost of goods, or at best just slow the rate at which products become cheaper.  But that is a price I think you will find most people are happy with if it means unsavory data harvesting is avoided.

 

 


QuicK and DirtY. Read the CoC it's like a guide on how not to be moron.  Also I don't have an issue with the VS series.

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4 minutes ago, mr moose said:

 

Naturally lost revenue from the cessation of any type of data tracking will ultimately increase the cost of goods, or at best just slow the rate at which products become cheaper.  But that is a price I think you will find most people are happy with if it means unsavory data harvesting is avoided.

 

 

Or at the least the one profiting off of the data should be the user, not the corporation. 


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22 hours ago, mr moose said:

 

Naturally lost revenue from the cessation of any type of data tracking will ultimately increase the cost of goods, or at best just slow the rate at which products become cheaper.  But that is a price I think you will find most people are happy with if it means unsavory data harvesting is avoided.

 

 

For sure. I think in the future I'm going to move my sensitive internet usage to a separate untracked machine, but for convenience's sake I don't mind tracking whatever I browse casually on my Android. I think the trade of convenience for data is fine in most cases as long as users have control over it, but in effect I think companies should be able to cut some (keyword: some) services from users that disable tracking. 


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5 hours ago, Crossbred said:

For sure. I think in the future I'm going to move my sensitive internet usage to a separate untracked machine, but for convenience's sake I don't mind tracking whatever I browse casually on my Android. I think the trade of convenience for data is fine in most cases as long as users have control over it, but in effect I think companies should be able to cut some (keyword: some) services from users that disable tracking. 

yep, there is a line between data collected to improve products in an honest manner, and data collected to on sell etc. 


QuicK and DirtY. Read the CoC it's like a guide on how not to be moron.  Also I don't have an issue with the VS series.

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And should still be controllable. If I want to help Google, Microsoft or Apple, fine, I can allow the telemetry and automatic feedback reporting. If I don't want to, users should be allowed to disable that entirely, not with crap like Microsoft or Google where you untick bunch of things and they basically disregard it entirely. That's just unacceptable.

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