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Baking my GPU - which parts must I remove?

Juusuhako
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Hello all,

my 780 died on me (artifcats) and I wanna try bake it before I buy a new one.

I removed the cooler, but there are some parts of which I'm unsure if whether or not I must remove.

 

First is this "part" that was screwed on onto all these small "chips"(?). The surface is very "wet", like oil. No idea what it is.
5EJvUwx.jpg

 

Second are the inputs (HDMI, DVI etc.)

icepXXs.jpg

 

Do I leave the oily-thing on? Isn't it gonna "dry out" in an oven? And of course, must I unscrew the inputs?

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18 minutes ago, lewdicrous said:

Maybe this vid will help

 

Ah, thanks. Seems like inputs are left there. Unfortunately the "oily stuff" doesn't seem to be on the card he uses.

17 minutes ago, Alexsolo said:

Anything you can unscrew or remove I'd take off the device, leaving just the bare PCB.

I can take off the what looks like a heatsink (first picture), but I've no idea if it's a yay or nay to leave the "oiled up" small "chips" exposed when it's in the oven.

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1 minute ago, Juusuhako said:

the "oily stuff"

That's the thermal paste/compound.

It's better to remove it now, cause you'll need to replace it either way.

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6 minutes ago, lewdicrous said:

That's the thermal paste/compound.

It's better to remove it now, cause you'll need to replace it either way.

The heatsink has these (what looks like thermal) pads that touches the small "chips". Should I assume it's still sufficient to use after the bake, or do I need to put a tiny drop or paste on every single one afterwards? (I'm not putting this into the oven with the PCB)

woLhrtM.jpg

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Don't waste time baking it. It won't really fix it. If it works again it's extremely temporary.

 

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3 minutes ago, Juusuhako said:

The heatsink has these pads that touches the small "chips". Should I assume it's still sufficient to use after the bake, or do I need to put a tiny drop or paste on every single one afterwards? (I'm not putting this into the oven with the PCB)

That's a thermal pad, don't put it in the oven.

I'd suggest replacing it if you're going to use the card for a long time, but it may work well enough just for testing, just remember to put it back where it belongs.

And of course, the obligatory "don't quote me on that". I may very well be wrong.

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36 minutes ago, Windows7ge said:

Don't waste time baking it. It won't really fix it. If it works again it's extremely temporary.

 

Oh? I see a lot of people reporting they've used theirs for years to come after a bake. I'd say the only thing holding me back right now are the lots of people (google reading), who says not to do it in an everyday-oven due to fumes and stuff that might stick/coat the oven. ?

 

35 minutes ago, lewdicrous said:

That's a thermal pad, don't put it in the oven.

I'd suggest replacing it if you're going to use the card for a long time, but it may work well enough just for testing, just remember to put it back where it belongs.

And of course, the obligatory "don't quote me on that". I may very well be wrong.

Alright, thanks for the help.

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9 minutes ago, Juusuhako said:

Oh? I see a lot of people reporting they've used theirs for years to come after a bake. I'd say the only thing holding me back right now are the lots of people (google reading), who says not to do it in an everyday-oven due to fumes and stuff that might stick/coat the oven. ?

 

If you insist that you want to try it then far be it from me to stop you. Just understand that if it comes out unscathed but still doesn't work or only works for a short time then this is why.

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2 minutes ago, Windows7ge said:

If you insist that you want to try it then far be it from me to stop you. Just understand that if it comes out unscathed but still doesn't work or only works for a short time then this is why.

I understand. I'm gonna deep-clean it tomorrow and try reseat it in both slots. If no-go I'll find a 2nd hand 1070 or something. Don't really wanna risk any fumes/toxic stuff coating my oven. Thanks for the info.

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7 minutes ago, Juusuhako said:

I understand. I'm gonna deep-clean it tomorrow and try reseat it in both slots. If no-go I'll find a 2nd hand 1070 or something. Don't really wanna risk any fumes/toxic stuff coating my oven. Thanks for the info.

Let me know how it goes. I'll be curious as to the result.

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56 minutes ago, Windows7ge said:

Don't waste time baking it. It won't really fix it. If it works again it's extremely temporary.

 

wuuuut a friend baked his 580 5 years ago and he still uses it

 

and for the OP: I'd remove everything including the ports, unless you want to melt the DVI port and have some sticky goo inside your oven, electric ovens are better than gas/coal ones, clean the PCB before baking it.

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2 minutes ago, Windows7ge said:

Let me know how it goes. I'll be curious as to the result.

Picking up some new paste and "air in a can" tomorrow. The heatsink is definitely somewhat "clogged" with dust. That being said, I did do a FurMark-test after I started getting the artifacts and temps. we're not a problem (idle at 50ish). FurMark lasted about 20ish seconds, commence artifacting/solid color monitors and then PC rebooted. So given it doesn't seem that temps. are an issue I'm not sure cleaning the heatsink is gonna help much, but I'll update tomorrow.

1 minute ago, aezakmi said:

wuuuut a friend baked his 580 5 years ago and he still uses it

 

and for the OP: I'd remove everything including the ports, unless you want to melt the DVI port and have some sticky goo inside your oven, electric ovens are better than gas/coal ones, clean the PCB before baking it.

Yeah I've read a lot of succes stories, I just don't wanna take the risk when it comes to supposed toxic fumes, so the oven is gonna be a no-go I'm afraid.

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10 minutes ago, aezakmi said:

wuuuut a friend baked his 580 5 years ago and he still uses it

The biggest misconception has to do with reflowing cracked solder balls under the GPU die when in reality the temperature of the oven isn't high enough to melt the solder. It's entirely possible your friends problem was unrelated and the high heat did something else that genuinely helped.

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Unfortunately cleaning it and giving it new paste made no difference, aside from temps. (now idling at 29-30c, yay!). But, when opening FurMark only a second or two goes by and the monitor starts flickering like crazy, then it reboots. It works fine in idle (YouTube, Browsing, Illustrator).

 

Also tested in Subnautica (game), it lasted about 5 minutes until it reached 60c and then rebooted. After reboot I had to wait a minute or so before I could - yet again - reboot and get signal back. So it seems at a certain "peak" it dies out, and then has to "calm down" again (if you will) for a minute, before being able to give a signal again.

 

Thanks for everyones help. Time to find a new one it seems.

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