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UPS Recommendation, experiencing power surges

Kevinjr12
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Go to solution Solved by Hairless Monkey Boy,

If you are dealing with lots of small power surges, then you want something with AVR (auto voltage regulation).

 

If you are powering a system like yours with a new efficient PSU, then you also want something with PFC (power factor correction) compatibility.

 

And if you are powering a device like a computer that may be sensitive to the quality of the power, then you want something with a true sinewave output, not simulated sinewave or steppped sinewave output.

 

The Cyberpower CP1500PFCLCD checks all those boxes, and has enough capacity to handle your PC, all peripherals, and your networking devices.

Hi, I moved into a new house I am renting a few months ago and I have noticed a few power surges already that have cause brief power outages (house is pretty old). I am looking to get a UPS to get more protection for my PC. I currently use a triplite surge protector, but it has never been tripped by the surges. I am looking for a recommendation of what UPS to get, and I have a few questions.

 

1. I read I shouldn't plug the UPS into a surge protector, is that true? If so, will the UPS alone provide more protection than the surge protector?

2. I use a ethernet connection for internet for my computer, does that mean the router also has to be plugged into the UPS for full protection (can enough power go through the ethernet cable to hurt the comp)?

3. Should I plug my monitors/other peripherals into the UPS as well? Is there a UPS that could power all of that? Or just use a surge protector for the rest?

 

My comp specs are:

 

  • CPU
    Ryzen 7 5800x
  • Motherboard
    MSI MAG B550 TOMAHAWK
  • RAM
    G.Skill Trident Z RGB 32GB DDR4-3600 CL 16
  • GPU
    ASUS TUF Gaming NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3080 OC
  • Case
    Lian Li Lancool II Mesh
  • Storage
    Western Digital Black SN850 1 TB, Western Digital Black SN750 2 TB, Seagate BarraCuda ST2000DM008 2TB 7200 RPM
  • PSU
    Enermax Revolution D.F. 850 W 80+ Gold
  • Display(s)
    LG 27gn950-b, Dell S2721QS
  • Cooling
    Noctua NH-D15
     
    Thanks!
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Both of the APC UPS I use offer surge protection. Some outlets are for battery backup + protection and some are just protection without battery backup, I use those for extra monitors and printer as they are not that essential.

 

Regarding the Ethernet, I've had signal issues when routing that from router to switch to wall ethernet outlet to UPS to PC and was getting disconnects. Going directly from router to UPS to PC works fine though but that's not feasible for me so I don't use it. I have a 2nd smaller UPS just for my router now.

 

I have the APC Back UPS Pro 1500 for my main PC, works fine and saved me from many micro outages already.

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1. Correct, don't plug a surge protector into a UPS, because a UPS is a surge protector too.

2. It's OK to plug the router into the UPS.

3. It's OK to plug the monitor in as long as the UPS has the capability of supporting one.

 

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I have two computers. A gaming rig and an older server/home PC. Both have a UPS; The gaming rig runs off one UPS, my monitors, server/home PC, and ALL of my networking gear run off the second UPS.

 

During a power outage, the server will shut down after 5 minutes; My gaming PC will shut down when there's 5 minutes of UPS runtime left (if I'm not home, then I'll shut it down in the first 10 minutes of outage). My networking gear will run for hours, and if I need emergency internet access, it's available on my phone via WiFi, if 4G isn't working (has happened here not too long ago).

 

Run time while gaming is around 7 minutes, idle run time is like 45 minutes.

"Don't fall down the hole!" ~James, 2022

 

"If you have a monitor, look at that monitor with your eyeballs." ~ Jake, 2022

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If you are dealing with lots of small power surges, then you want something with AVR (auto voltage regulation).

 

If you are powering a system like yours with a new efficient PSU, then you also want something with PFC (power factor correction) compatibility.

 

And if you are powering a device like a computer that may be sensitive to the quality of the power, then you want something with a true sinewave output, not simulated sinewave or steppped sinewave output.

 

The Cyberpower CP1500PFCLCD checks all those boxes, and has enough capacity to handle your PC, all peripherals, and your networking devices.

BabyBlu (Primary): 

  • CPU: Intel Core i9 9900K @ up to 5.3GHz, 5.0GHz all-core, delidded
  • Motherboard: Asus Maximus XI Hero
  • RAM: G.Skill Trident Z RGB 4x8GB DDR4-3200 @ 4000MHz 16-18-18-34
  • GPU: MSI RTX 2080 Sea Hawk EK X, 2070MHz core, 8000MHz mem
  • Case: Phanteks Evolv X
  • Storage: XPG SX8200 Pro 2TB, 3x ADATASU800 1TB (RAID 0), Samsung 970 EVO Plus 500GB
  • PSU: Corsair HX1000i
  • Display: MSI MPG341CQR 34" 3440x1440 144Hz Freesync, Dell S2417DG 24" 2560x1440 165Hz Gsync
  • Cooling: Custom water loop (CPU & GPU), Radiators: 1x140mm(Back), 1x280mm(Top), 1x420mm(Front)
  • Keyboard: Corsair Strafe RGB (Cherry MX Brown)
  • Mouse: MasterMouse MM710
  • Headset: Corsair Void Pro RGB
  • OS: Windows 10 Pro

Roxanne (Wife Build):

  • CPU: Intel Core i7 4790K @ up to 5.0GHz, 4.8Ghz all-core, relidded w/ LM
  • Motherboard: Asus Z97A
  • RAM: G.Skill Sniper 4x8GB DDR3-2400 @ 10-12-12-24
  • GPU: EVGA GTX 1080 FTW2 w/ LM
  • Case: Corsair Vengeance C70, w/ Custom Side-Panel Window
  • Storage: Samsung 850 EVO 250GB, Samsung 860 EVO 1TB, Silicon Power A80 2TB NVME
  • PSU: Corsair AX760
  • Display: Samsung C27JG56 27" 2560x1440 144Hz Freesync
  • Cooling: Corsair H115i RGB
  • Keyboard: GMMK TKL(Kailh Box White)
  • Mouse: Glorious Model O-
  • Headset: SteelSeries Arctis 7
  • OS: Windows 10 Pro

BigBox (HTPC):

  • CPU: Ryzen 5800X3D
  • Motherboard: Gigabyte B550i Aorus Pro AX
  • RAM: Corsair Vengeance LPX 2x8GB DDR4-3600 @ 3600MHz 14-14-14-28
  • GPU: MSI RTX 3080 Ventus 3X Plus OC, de-shrouded, LM TIM, replaced mem therm pads
  • Case: Fractal Design Node 202
  • Storage: SP A80 1TB, WD Black SN770 2TB
  • PSU: Corsair SF600 Gold w/ NF-A9x14
  • Display: Samsung QN90A 65" (QLED, 4K, 120Hz, HDR, VRR)
  • Cooling: Thermalright AXP-100 Copper w/ NF-A12x15
  • Keyboard/Mouse: Rii i4
  • Controllers: 4X Xbox One & 2X N64 (with USB)
  • Sound: Denon AVR S760H with 5.2.2 Atmos setup.
  • OS: Windows 10 Pro

Harmonic (NAS/Game/Plex/Other Server):

  • CPU: Intel Core i7 6700
  • Motherboard: ASRock FATAL1TY H270M
  • RAM: 64GB DDR4-2133
  • GPU: Intel HD Graphics 530
  • Case: Fractal Design Define 7
  • HDD: 3X Seagate Exos X16 14TB in RAID 5
  • SSD: Inland Premium 512GB NVME, Sabrent 1TB NVME
  • Optical: BDXL WH14NS40 flashed to WH16NS60
  • PSU: Corsair CX450
  • Display: None
  • Cooling: Noctua NH-U14S
  • Keyboard/Mouse: None
  • OS: Windows 10 Pro

NAS:

  • Synology DS216J
  • 2x8TB WD Red NAS HDDs in RAID 1. 8TB usable space
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1 hour ago, Hairless Monkey Boy said:

 

 

The Cyberpower CP1500PFCLCD checks all those boxes.

I have this exact unit and am very happy with it. When connected to my PC it even reports stats to HWInfo. At the 190W load which is my PC and display at idle at the desktop, its estimating 40 minutes or so of runtime. 

 

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