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Desoldering fixed wires (2009 PSU)

Hi, I have a Corsair 950XT PSU from 2009, and my case (m-ATX) does not support all the wires. I want to desolder the cables since most of them (that are in the way) are Molex connectors. I will be using my university facilities to get rid of the wires and consulting the tutors there, but I wanted to see what the community thinks?

Note: These tutors are professionals in PCB design and robotics

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It can be done but its a massive chore as you will need an extremely powerful soldering iron to actually get the solder to liquify. There is just too much material to heat up. I attempted to do exactly that few years back  I honestly wouldnt bother doing it ever again. Getting a modular power supply is easier, cleaner and you wouldnt have to ruin the one you already have.

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4 minutes ago, Fascinated Viewer said:

I want to desolder the cables since most of them (that are in the way) are Molex connectors. I will be using my university facilities to get rid of the wires and consulting the tutors there, but I wanted to see what the community thinks?

Honestly old Corsairs are not that worthwhile to save either, especially those high wattages. If you want a good project go for it after its plugged off for so long, or just... unplug everything in the first place.

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One thing you can do is cut off the wires to a certain length where you could repair them the day you'll need them again... and hide the source ends of the wires inside the PSU's chassis.

McGyver suggestion.

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I would only do this "for fun".  

 

You don't need a 950W PSU and a new one is not very expensive (as it doesn't need to be 950W).

 

Also, I have concerns about lethal voltages.   Your experts can help you here.  Back when that PSU was made, they did not have the IEC 623687-1 standard in place that we have today in order to get UL, CB, etc.

 

What that means to you is there is no discharge resistor or IC to drain that bulk capacitor(s).  

 

Newer PSUs that are CERTIFIED (I put that in all caps because not all are certified) will not have this issue.

 

 

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I would just cut the wires and cap them off with some heat shrink.  Desoldering is probably going to be a pain in the ass with how large the power planes are that they're connected to.

 

Molex nowadays isn't used for very much so it should be safe to only leave 1 or 2 there..

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23 minutes ago, Levent said:

It can be done but its a massive chore as you will need an extremely powerful soldering iron to actually get the solder to liquify. There is just too much material to heat up. I attempted to do exactly that few years back  I honestly wouldnt bother doing it ever again. Getting a modular power supply is easier, cleaner and you wouldnt have to ruin the one you already have.

I just did this a few hours ago with a puny 40W soldering iron with a cut copper nail as tip, it's not that hard, you just need to know how to position the board and what wires to pull, one by one.

 

Oh and my cap discharge tool is a flat head screwdriver with a wire going to ground, TÜV certified and everything. Don't try this at home.

Tender is the night

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