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Getiing a router for 5GHZ.

carrickwater
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So my main router is in another part of the house, and I can't move it because it's fiber. I thus wanted to know, what's my best option for a router which has wireless bridging and can give me 5GHZ in my room?

I'll like to stay below 50$ if possible, since I would only be using it my room, thank you.

 

Edit: I'm mainly using the to router to stream virtual desktop to my oculus go. There's this article but I don't know if it will make the go lag.

 

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44 minutes ago, carrickwater said:

So my main router is in another part of the house, and I can't move it because it's fiber. I thus wanted to know, what's my best option for a router which has wireless bridging and can give me 5GHZ in my room?

I'll like to stay below 50$ if possible, since I would only be using it my room, thank you.

 

Edit: I'm mainly using the to router to stream virtual desktop to my oculus go. There's this article but I don't know if it will make the go lag.

 

What is your interpretation of “wireless bridge”?

 

Are you completely against running ethernet from the fiber gateway to your room? Is it even an option?

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Just now, Falcon1986 said:

What is your interpretation of “wireless bridge”?

 

Are you completely against running ethernet from the fiber gateway to your room? Is it even an option?

It's not an option sadly. Even though I bought the internet for due to some complications it had to be placed in my sister's room which I can't run a cable from there to my room. 

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5 minutes ago, carrickwater said:

It's not an option sadly. Even though I bought the internet for due to some complications it had to be placed in my sister's room which I can't run a cable from there to my room. 

OK.

  1. How much distance is there from the gateway to your room? A rough sketch of the floor plan will be very useful.
  2. How old is the electrical wiring in the house?
  3. Do you have coaxial cable outlets in both rooms?
  4. What speed package are you paying for from the ISP?
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26 minutes ago, Falcon1986 said:

OK.

  1. How much distance is there from the gateway to your room? A rough sketch of the floor plan will be very useful.
  2. How old is the electrical wiring in the house?
  3. Do you have coaxial cable outlets in both rooms?
  4. What speed package are you paying for from the ISP?

1) She's in an outhouse so the distance is a bit considerable.

2) The house was built about 5 years ago.

3) No.

4) My ISP does not give a speed package, though they say the range is from 5 to 80 Mbps. On most days I get 30 when I use my wireless card. 

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@carrickwater

 

How much distance are you talking about here? And do you have a sketch of top-down layout of the buildings?

 

$50 is not much of a budget to work with. If you could run shielded ethernet underground between the 2 buildings, you could definitely stay within budget. If the buildings’ electrical wiring were connected, you could try powerline (although I personally don’t like it; a decent 2-unit system is going to cost >$50).

 

What is the make/model of ONT that your ISP provided? Is any other network hardware attached to the ONT?

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2 hours ago, Falcon1986 said:

@carrickwater

 

How much distance are you talking about here? And do you have a sketch of top-down layout of the buildings?

 

$50 is not much of a budget to work with. If you could run shielded ethernet underground between the 2 buildings, you could definitely stay within budget. If the buildings’ electrical wiring were connected, you could try powerline (although I personally don’t like it; a decent 2-unit system is going to cost >$50).

 

What is the make/model of ONT that your ISP provided? Is any other network hardware attached to the ONT?

I got an answer here, though I have to find out if my pc has gigabit Ethernet and I have to get a powerline adapter. 

 

 

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1 hour ago, carrickwater said:

I got an answer here, though I have to find out if my pc has gigabit Ethernet and I have to get a powerline adapter. 

 

 

Keep in mind that powerline only works as expected if the two locations are on the same electrical circuit. It’s also a hit or miss if the devices will work at all, but if you have the ability to return them if you don’t find them useful, then I guess it’s worth a shot.

 

Does your ISP’s ONT broadcast on a 5GHz WiFi antenna?

 

While I was looking around I came across the Ubiquiti’s Nanostation Loco 5AC. Normally, these devices are used as CPEs in wireless ISP setups or for PtP connections (where 2 units are dedicated to creating a wireless bridge). However, you can use 1 as a “glorified directional wireless adapter” by configuring it properly, pointing it in the direction of the wireless source (i.e. your ONT’s WiFi) and wiring it over ethernet to your PC. Of course, it will need good line-of-sight to work properly. Thankfully, airMax’s signal meters will help you to establish the ideal position and lock in a good connection.

 

You can get these units on eBay for $50-60.

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5 hours ago, Falcon1986 said:

Keep in mind that powerline only works as expected if the two locations are on the same electrical circuit. It’s also a hit or miss if the devices will work at all, but if you have the ability to return them if you don’t find them useful, then I guess it’s worth a shot.

 

Does your ISP’s ONT broadcast on a 5GHz WiFi antenna?

 

While I was looking around I came across the Ubiquiti’s Nanostation Loco 5AC. Normally, these devices are used as CPEs in wireless ISP setups or for PtP connections (where 2 units are dedicated to creating a wireless bridge). However, you can use 1 as a “glorified directional wireless adapter” by configuring it properly, pointing it in the direction of the wireless source (i.e. your ONT’s WiFi) and wiring it over ethernet to your PC. Of course, it will need good line-of-sight to work properly. Thankfully, airMax’s signal meters will help you to establish the ideal position and lock in a good connection.

 

You can get these units on eBay for $50-60.

Wow that's a lot of info which I don't really understand. 😅😅, but still thank you. How do I find out if my ISP’s ONT broadcast on a 5GHz WiFi antenna? Also, will the nanostation act as an AP or router while allowing ethernet connections?

 

I saw one on eBay for 54$.

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9 minutes ago, carrickwater said:

Wow that's a lot of info which I don't really understand. 😅😅, but still thank you. How do I find out if my ISP’s ONT broadcast on a 5GHz WiFi antenna?

 

Do I need two devices, the airmax and the nanostation? Thanks. 

Find the make/model of the device or log into the webUI and check the ‘wireless’ section.

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35 minutes ago, Falcon1986 said:

Find the make/model of the device or log into the webUI and check the ‘wireless’ section.

Can you please explain what exactly I should be looking for? I don't really get it. Also, I edited my message.

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@carrickwater

 

Thanks for the PM. But let’s keep the conversation in the public forum so others can benefit/help from the suggestions made.

 

The HG8245 is a Hauwei ONT (optical network terminal), but my Googling shows that it supports wireless B/G/N, not wireless AC. ‘N’ can work on 5GHz but in no way can it achieve the speeds of ‘AC’.

 

Does your computer support wireless-AC? Run WiFi Analyzer and post the screenshot of the ‘Networks’ and ‘Analyze’ (2.4GHz and 5GHz) screens. Trying to see if the Nanostation 5AC or plain Nanostation 5 (non-AC) is the best fit for your scenario.

 

21 hours ago, carrickwater said:

Also, will the nanostation act as an AP or router while allowing ethernet connections?

If you scanned through the link I posted earlier, the instructions go through setting up the Nanostation (albeit a Nanostation 2) to lock on to the remote wireless signal (so, it’s a receiver), then as its own little router on your end so your PC can get a unique IP and gain more stable internet access.

 

I thought you mentioned something about airMAX. AirMAX is Ubiquiti’s software that runs on this (legacy) generation of wireless devices. It is not a separate device. It has a built-in signal meter to help you align the antenna for the strongest reception (analogous to how a metal detector beeps louder and more frequently the closer it gets to metal, but this is a visual meter).

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I just saw your post. I'm getting a 5G wireless card for my PC, so I don't have access to the 2.4ghz screen. I heard windows can create a 5ghz hotspot, but I don't know if the one it creates is wireless AC. What do you think? The Nanostation also needs an adapter also to work. 

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7 hours ago, carrickwater said:

I just saw your post. I'm getting a 5G wireless card for my PC, so I don't have access to the 2.4ghz screen.

I've never seen a wireless adapter that only supports 5GHz and not 2.4GHz WiFi bands. With WiFi Analyzer, you have to manually click the 2.4GHz button to switch frequencies. If you find that your new wireless adapter gives you an improvement over your current speeds, I'd suggest you stick with that. Maybe add some higher gain antennae to the adapter and ONT and call it a day.

 

7 hours ago, carrickwater said:

I heard windows can create a 5ghz hotspot, but I don't know if the one it creates is wireless AC. What do you think? 

A hotspot just distributes your WiFi locally. You'll need to bridge it with your current connection. It's not going to help with the wireless link between your PC and the ONT, however. Unless this is something specific to your game's needs.

 

8 hours ago, carrickwater said:

The Nanostation also needs an adapter also to work. 

It has to be plugged into an ethernet port either on your PC or a network switch.

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21 hours ago, Falcon1986 said:

I've never seen a wireless adapter that only supports 5GHz and not 2.4GHz WiFi bands. With WiFi Analyzer, you have to manually click the 2.4GHz button to switch frequencies. If you find that your new wireless adapter gives you an improvement over your current speeds, I'd suggest you stick with that. Maybe add some higher gain antennae to the adapter and ONT and call it a day.

 

A hotspot just distributes your WiFi locally. You'll need to bridge it with your current connection. It's not going to help with the wireless link between your PC and the ONT, however. Unless this is something specific to your game's needs.

 

It has to be plugged into an ethernet port either on your PC or a network switch.

Thanks for your help. 

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As its an outhouse you'd be much better off using a point to point link such the Ubiquiti Litebeam units to connect the buildings (its none-standard WiFi more optimised for outdoors), then have a second router in the main house in Access Point mode for wired ethernet and WiFi connections.

I spent many years using standard WiFi to link two buildings and am glad I eventually ditched it as the reliability and speed is vastly superior.

The MikroTik wireless wire may even work for this, depending on how good the line of sight is.

Router: i5-7200U appliance running pfSense WiFi: Zyxel NWA210AX (~940Mbit peak) + Ubiquiti nanoHD (OpenWRT)
ISPs: Zen VDSL (66Mbit) + Lebara 4G [Vodafone] (~120Mbit) + Three 5G (~700Mbit during quiet hours, ~500Mbit peak hours)

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