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jamesquirk

How Do I Overclock My Qnix 2710 to 144hz/120hz

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But hey, you don't have one and obviously don't know much about it.  You shouldn't make assumptions about things based on an entirely different piece of hardware using the same general term of "overclocking".

 

Huh? I'm the OP of this thread...sooooo I do have one?

Yes I don't know much about it and I do not care about informing myself because I couldn't care less about it, however I was told what I said by someone else and I thought it was correct, that's why I replied with it here. Thanks for correcting me in such a precise manner.

 

Edit: whoops confused this post with my own 1440p post, so yeah - actually not OP

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Huh? I'm the OP of this thread...sooooo I do have one?

Yes I don't know much about it and I do not care about informing myself because I couldn't care less about it, however I was told what I said by someone else and I thought it was correct, that's why I replied with it here. Thanks for correcting me in such a precise manner.

 

Edit: whoops confused this post with my own 1440p post, so yeah - actually not OP

 

LOL.  Well you shouldn't believe everything you read, there are several thousand page threads on other forums about these monitors.  If you want information you should look at the FAQs on those (at overclock.net and 120hz.net), I haven't read *all* of the posts because it's just crazy, but I've read through an awful lot of them.  It took me a long time to decide if it was worth the risks to get one of these monitors, and in the process I learned a lot about them.  I assumed you didn't have one of these because you compared it to CPU overclocking and it couldn't be more different.  The only similarity is the term being used.

 

It's fine that you don't care, but then you shouldn't be coming into a thread and repeating information you either 1) don't know is accurate because you're parroting it or 2) don't care.  There are a lot of people who don't know better on the Internet and don't bother to vet information with another source.  When someone tells *me* something, I google it and see if they actually know what they are talking about or if they are full of it.  Most people on forums like this pretend they are experts and really know very little.  I am an expert on video, I worked in the industry for a number of years with reps for the major brands and I sold the products myself for a period of time.  Now I work in IT, but I still enjoy this stuff and spend a considerable amount of time doing research on current tech.

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That is right aithos, you should listen to your own advice. When you don't know something, don't pretend you do.

 

That's hilarious coming from you.  Keep telling yourself that Lightboost works by tricking your visual cortex.  Hint:  3D works by tricking your eye, Lightboost works by eliminating the permanance of a frame by clearing the screen slightly after a frame is displayed.  Hmm, maybe we should look at a few of the other gems you've said:

 

 

You GPU won't short it's the life.. monitor we don't know for sure.

 

Check for frame skipping: http://www.testufo.com/#test=frameskipping

 

Of course when you'll overclock the monitor, you'll get to enjoy motion blur, as the panel is not fast enough, so expect that.

 

Because, you know...overclocking to a faster refresh rate (without dropped frames) clearly gives you more motion blur...it's not like a faster refresh rate lessens motion blur or anything...

 

Or:

 

not really. The "smoother gaming experience" is motion blur. If you have a true, well reviewed 120Hz monitor next to it, you'

ll notice, and you'll drop frames by the monitor, as the internal circuitry isn't actually fast enough.

 

Oh yeah, I totally forgot that "smoother" motion and extra frames is really motion blur.  Motion blur isn't that horribly blurry, painful to look at thing that LCD monitors do...Oh right...and it's because the internal circuitry isn't fast enough.  As if we haven't already established that these single input bypass monitors don't drop frames and ARE fast enough. 

 

Just give it a rest already, we've already shown you're one of the people I'm talking about here.  You've said so many wrong things in *this* thread alone, without even looking at other threads you've posted in it's hilarious. 

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GoodBytes is right, motion blur is going to be increased if you significantly OC these panels. Motion blur already occurs when they aren't OC'ed, by increasing the refresh rate you are reducing the time a pixel remains the colour it's told to be and increase the time it stays transitions between these colours.

 

The pixels of PLS/IPS panels (even 60Hz TN and to a lesser extent 120Hz TN panels, with Lightboost the only way to truly eliminate motion blur on LCD panels today) aren't quick enough to transition fully from one colour to the next in 16ms, let alone half that, so all have some degree of motion blur/ghosting. OCing these panels essentially results in their pixels constantly being in a state of transition between colours (which still occurs, but to a lesser extent, with them at 60Hz) and you'll get a longer trail of ghosted pixels (ie increased motion blur).

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I tried "overclock" my monitor once, from 60 Hz pushed to 75/80 Hz, it did get hotter but not too hot. That made me really concerned if I'm going to damage my monitor. One thing I don't really like is the color after overclocked, it was pretty bad. It went from crappy to crappier :/

 

If I were op, I'm not going to do any overclocking on any monitor unless the manufacture clearly stated that it's capable of overclocking. I know that I can overclock stuff but if it not "unlocked" or "overclock ready", I'm not going to try. It won't go very far + it will require some work to make it work properly. Save some buck and get yourself a better stuff xD

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That's hilarious coming from you.  Keep telling yourself that Lightboost works by tricking your visual cortex.  Hint:  3D works by tricking your eye, Lightboost works by eliminating the permanance of a frame by clearing the screen slightly after a frame is displayed.  Hmm, maybe we should look at a few of the other gems you've said:

http://www.blurbusters.com/zero-motion-blur/lightboost/

LightBoost monitors have a strobe backlight feature that completely eliminate motion blur for 2D

 

 

Because, you know...overclocking to a faster refresh rate (without dropped frames) clearly gives you more motion blur...it's not like a faster refresh rate lessens motion blur or anything...

In brief: LCD is made of a liquid crystal (hence: Liquid Crystal Display (LCD)), which turns to allow more or less light to pass through a filter glass.

When energy is sent, the liquid if a sub pixel turns, to allow more light to pass through. The rotation of the liquid crystal takes time. Hence, motion blur.

Here is a brief explanation of how an TN panel LCD, with LED backlight, monitor works:

The way the liquid is integrated and how it works exactly is what makes the different panel types:

dalle-tn.jpg

dalle-LCD-PSA-HX750-2.jpg

samsung_galaxy_tab-10-1-2.jpg

pana-et60-sous-pix.jpg

And they are a lot more. The above is just a sample of different types and sub types of an active-matrix TFT LCD panel.

This shows how the LCD liquid is arranged, and how it is formed and tricks to improve pixel response time

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IPS_panel). The LCD liquid itself can be molecular improved as well, to be more responsive.

So my point, is that you can't just force feed LCD panel to display more pixels. And it's not because of the circuitry.

We have much faster processors (integrated circuit.. yes that's a processor) available, and they are dirt cheap, those can be implemented on a monitors. Yet, we still don't have 120Hz or 600Hz or 4GHz (I mean why stop at 144Hz?), panels. Why? Because that's not the problem! What you are suggested makes no sense. What we do gain out of faster circuit design, and faster color processors (for monitor that uses one), is reduce input lag, and every newer models of monitor from almost every manufacture, shows monitor input lag reducing.

The LCD liquid crystal has a certain speed of rotation. Feeding it more information faster, does not make the liquid turn at the position its suppose to be faster, it will go "half way" (well it depends on the color it is currently on, and what is the next one), and then receive power to the following color, turning to different level. This results in, not only motion blur, but increase level of it, as we already have motion blur, normally, as the LCD liquid isn't instant, there is a movement going on.

 

Oh yeah, I totally forgot that "smoother" motion and extra frames is really motion blur.  Motion blur isn't that horribly blurry, painful to look at thing that LCD monitors do...Oh right...and it's because the internal circuitry isn't fast enough.  As if we haven't already established that these single input bypass monitors don't drop frames and ARE fast enough.

When you have motion blur on moving object, you see that it moves smoother across the screen. This leads one, with an untrained eye, to see that it is like you are seeing more frames, as the animation is visually (keywords here) smoother.

Look up for yourself.

 

Just give it a rest already, we've already shown you're one of the people I'm talking about here.  You've said so many wrong things in *this* thread alone, without even looking at other threads you've posted in it's hilarious.

Trying to get the last word, as if you won some argument, when you are the one that say things that the top results of a Google search contradicts you. Niiice Mr. Perfect.
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In regards to 2D Lightboost, aithos is most correct. It eliminates pixel persistence (ie motion blur/ghosting) by removing a pixels means of persisting, ie the backlight. Pixels don't producing any ghosting because they are not illuminated at the time (between refresh cycles) when motion blur/ghosting occurs.

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In regards to 2D Lightboost, aithos is most correct. It eliminates pixel persistence (ie motion blur/ghosting) by removing a pixels means of persisting, ie the backlight. Pixels don't producing any ghosting because they are not illuminated at the time (between refresh cycles) when motion blur/ghosting occurs.

Of course, that is right, and that is awesome.

But he is saying that LCD monitor, due to LightBoost technology, simply doesn't have any motion blur. Like it makes each pixel be able to rotate to the requested color at the speed of light, while, all is happening, as you well explained, doesn't illuminate the pixels being in transition. The motion blur is still there. Your eyes can see the strobe light effect, but it's our brain that smooth things out, making the end result, a, what it looks like, 0 motion blur display.

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http://www.blurbusters.com/zero-motion-blur/lightboost/

 

 

In brief: LCD is made of a liquid crystal (hence: Liquid Crystal Display (LCD)), which turns to allow more or less light to pass through a filter glass.

When energy is sent, the liquid if a sub pixel turns, to allow more light to pass through. The rotation of the liquid crystal takes time. Hence, motion blur.

Here is a brief explanation of how an TN panel LCD, with LED backlight, monitor works:

The way the liquid is integrated and how it works exactly is what makes the different panel types:

dalle-tn.jpg

dalle-LCD-PSA-HX750-2.jpg

samsung_galaxy_tab-10-1-2.jpg

pana-et60-sous-pix.jpg

And they are a lot more. The above is just a sample of different types and sub types of an active-matrix TFT LCD panel.

This shows how the LCD liquid is arranged, and how it is formed and tricks to improve pixel response time

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IPS_panel). The LCD liquid itself can be molecular improved as well, to be more responsive.

So my point, is that you can't just force feed LCD panel to display more pixels. And it's not because of the circuitry.

We have much faster processors (integrated circuit.. yes that's a processor) available, and they are dirt cheap, those can be implemented on a monitors. Yet, we still don't have 120Hz or 600Hz or 4GHz (I mean why stop at 144Hz?), panels. Why? Because that's not the problem! What you are suggested makes no sense. What we do gain out of faster circuit design, and faster color processors (for monitor that uses one), is reduce input lag, and every newer models of monitor from almost every manufacture, shows monitor input lag reducing.

The LCD liquid crystal has a certain speed of rotation. Feeding it more information faster, does not make the liquid turn at the position its suppose to be faster, it will go "half way" (well it depends on the color it is currently on, and what is the next one), and then receive power to the following color, turning to different level. This results in, not only motion blur, but increase level of it, as we already have motion blur, normally, as the LCD liquid isn't instant, there is a movement going on.

 

When you have motion blur on moving object, you see that it moves smoother across the screen. This leads one, with an untrained eye, to see that it is like you are seeing more frames, as the animation is visually (keywords here) smoother.

Look up for yourself.

 

Trying to get the last word, as if you won some argument, when you are the one that say things that the top results of a Google search contradicts you. Niiice Mr. Perfect.

 

You really don't understand the first thing about LCD monitors.  First of all, and I want you to read this a couple times:  THE PIXELS ON A MONITOR HAVE NOTHING TO DO WITH THE PANEL.

 

Got it?  Let's go over the basics of what a monitor is, there are four basic parts of a monitor (I've explained this before, which you clearly didn't read or understand but I'll do it again).

 

1) Screen - this is your LCD portion.  It has pixels.  The screen is the same no matter what panel, lighting source or PCB is hooked up to it.  When you say "the pixels aren't fast enough" you're wrong.  The pixels have nothing to do with the refresh rate or the response time at all.  They literally are on or off.  Which combination of colors the panel filters determines what your eye perceives as color.  You sound like a complete moron when you imply that pixels have a damn thing to do with the refresh rate or response time.  IPS, TN, VA, every panel type uses the same pixels.  Same with TVs.  The screens are all made by the same people for every TV and monitor on the market.  The ONLY difference is the pixel density which determines the resolution a monitor is capable of displaying.  There is no reason you couldn't have a 2560x1440 TN panel except the panel isn't capable of displaying the same kind of colors or uniformity...which makes it bad for graphical work.  1440p and higher resolutions are traditionally used for graphical work, not other tasks.

 

2) Panel - this is what interfaces with the screen, the PCB and the lighting source.  It determines a lot of things (response rate, color depth, uniformity, etc) but again, it does NOT determine refresh rate, at least not by itself.  The panel has some limitations, but is largely limited by the other two components we haven't talked about yet.  The panel itself is purely responsible for viewing angle. The panel in a nutshell filters the lighting from the source to show you what the PCB says is supposed to be on the screen.  The response time of a monitor is how quickly the panel can apply that "filter"  The screen, the pixels...have nothing to do with it.  If a panel has a really bad response time it *can* affect motion blur because the panel won't be able to keep up with the signal, but it still doesn't determine refresh rate.  Companies just wouldn't make a monitor that has a higher response time (full transition) than the refresh rate demands because it counteracts some of the benefit.  (I'll talk about this more below).

 

3) Lighting - this is what physically lights up the screen.  It has some effect on colors because colored (full array) LEDs are better than white LEDs are better than CFL lighting.  Otherwise, the lighting has no impact on anything except power usage.

 

4) PCB - this is the brains of the monitor.  This is what determines how the signal gets to the panel to be displayed, what kind of processing is done on it, what kinds of inputs you can use, what the lag is, what the refresh rate is.  Let's talk about the refresh rate specifically since you still don't understand it:  your graphics card sends a signal into the input on your monitor, that signal goes through your scaler for processing, goes through any additional processing there might be for graphical improvement and gets passed to the panel to be displayed.  How fast the PCB is capable of getting that signal from the input to the panel largely determines how fast the panel can refresh.  There is no hard limit on the panel for how quickly it can refresh. 

 

Ok, so now that we know what the parts of the monitor do, what is the point?

 

The point is that name brand companies haven't released 120hz or faster IPS monitors because multi-input PCBs with scalers aren't capable of running fast enough to push that many frames per second.  The IPS panels also don't have stellar response time, but using overdrive (as people will point out in IPS gaming threads) they *can* get as low as 7ms for a full transition.  That means the panels are technically capable of running faster than 120hz since that is roughly 8ms between frames.  So what does that mean for motion blur?  Motion blur happens in one of two scenarios: 

 

1) the response time can't keep up with the refresh rate - this is the lesser of two blurs, barely noticable and only occurs if the response time is higher than the refresh rate.  The fact of the matter is that most transitions (unless you're using lightboost) aren't full transitions.  Let's say you're transitioning from one color to another, the monitor doesn't turn the pixel off and then do a new transition, it just changes.  That's why monitor companies advertise GTG response (other than it makes them look better) because they know most transitions aren't black to white.

 

2) the refresh rate is slow enough that the frame permanance is a long time - this is the worse of the two blurs.  This is why 60hz LCDs are the worst for motion, because you see each frame for a full 16ms without a change and pixel transitions are partial ones.  120hz cuts that time in half, which lowers (but doesn't eliminate) motion blur.  144hz cuts it down even further.  The only way to "eliminate" motion blur is to combine a high refresh rate monitor with lightboost and a panel with a fast enough response time (full transition) to make it so that the human eye can't detect motion blur.  It doesn't matter if a machine can see a little blur, if it isn't detectable by the naken eye for all intensive purposes it isn't there.

 

Now, let's talk about your other points:

 

LCD - just stop talking, you're contradicting yourself all over the place.  First you say it's the circuitry, then you say it isn't the circuitry.  You pretend it's the LCD pixels that cause the problem by ignoring the fact that TN panels are fully capable of displaying 144 frames per second.  You're very confused and you aren't proving anything.  You quote me blurbusters, but you don't even know what lightboost does.  I've explained it quite thoroughly a couple times now and you just aren't getting it.  You throw baseless accusations at me while ignoring all the highly detailed information I've given you.  Then when someone else jumps to my defense you change your tune and come up with some other BS reason why I'm wrong.

 

Smoothness - Stop it.  Motion blur does NOT make things look more smooth.  Motion blur makes this blurry, it makes things LESS smooth.  It makes it so you can't see crisp edges and clear lines.  When a panel is running 120hz things look more smooth because there are twice as many frames for each movement.  I've drawn this before but it's like this:

 

60hz:   A ---------------- A ---------------- A --------------- A ---------------- A

120hz: A ------ A ------ A ------ A ------ A ------ A ------ A ------ A ------ A

 

It looks smoother because you see those extra frames, there is less motion blur because the frames are displayed quicker so the permanance issue (which you're still ignoring) is cut in half.  Frames are only there for 8ms instead of 16ms.

 

Of course, that is right, and that is awesome.

But he is saying that LCD monitor, due to LightBoost technology, simply doesn't have any motion blur. Like it makes each pixel be able to rotate to the requested color at the speed of light, while, all is happening, as you well explained, doesn't illuminate the pixels being in transition. The motion blur is still there. Your eyes can see the strobe light effect, but it's our brain that smooth things out, making the end result, a, what it looks like, 0 motion blur display.

 

Edit:  Now I see what you're trying to say here.  You're trying to say the pixel response is the main cause of motion blur, you're wrong.  Pixel response doesn't cause noticable motion blur, like I said...only if the response time is higher than the refresh rate.  The main cause of motion blur is pixel permanance, as I've stated about a dozen times now.  So if you eliminate pixel permanance (with lightboost) and you're running 120hz or faster...you will have no detectable motion blur.  You might add a tiny bit of input lag by strobing the backlight, but the 10% setting is so fast that you wouldn't notice it.  On an IPS that is being overclocked, you're reducing motion blur because the frames are only on the screen for 8ms instead of 16.  Since you still have permanance, the transitions are NOT full transitions and the monitors response time is 8ms.  So you're not creating more motion blur by the response time being slower than the refresh rate.

 

I was just quoting this because you backtracked again, as you've done several times.  Here, you can go read the motion blur related posts on Blurbusters since you obviously skipped those:

 

chart: http://www.blurbusters.com/zero-motion-blur/10vs50vs100/

60vs120vs lightboost: http://www.blurbusters.com/faq/60vs120vslb/

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And now you go off again, like if I know nothing. What else? You are going to explain me how a car is?

Please explain to me what a car is. Where does the word 'car' comes from.

And again, you are wrong. Re-iterating what is wrong again and again, when I provide you with sources proving you wrong.

Yes yes you are right, LightBoost is this magic pixy dust that makes LCD panels go at 1000 GHZ, and provide 0 motion blur, and and somewhat boost colors, and makes you bacon and eggs every morning.

And what you failed to understand is that blurbusters.com shows you what you perceive in the chart, not the reality of things.

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And now you go off again, like if I know nothing. What else? You are going to explain me how a car is?

Please explain to me what a car is. Where does the word 'car' comes from.

And again, you are wrong. Re-iterating what is wrong again and again, when I provide you with sources proving you wrong.

 

 

Edit:  Not even worth my time anymore.  You've shown you don't know what you're talking about repeatedly by contradicting yourself and making completely inaccurate statements.

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I know more than you. You have serious reading comprehension problem, as you are adding words in people mouth. I am no specialists, so I can't comment on the mater.

But the end results is that you decide to comprehend things in your way, and then treat every single person, on this forum, as morons and provide 0 respect towards them. In addition, you insult them, directly or indirectly. You feel that everything you say and do is always right, and you can't handle to be corrected. And the worst, is that you are ignorant of it all.

I have been VERY patient with you. Next time your behavior continues, I'll report your posts, because it ends up escalating your behavior exponentially.

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