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jamesquirk

How Do I Overclock My Qnix 2710 to 144hz/120hz

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Do you even have to the graphics power to make use of that? Because I kind of doubt you would. Also you do realise t his will shorten it's lifespan.

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actually why do i need to overclock the monitor will it help the frames

overclocking the monitor allows it to refresh more times in a set amount of time.

so it shows more frames,and each of the frames is shown for a shorter period of time making it a more fluid gaming experience.

The disadvantage is since the monitor wasn't intended to run at said refresh rate it can't be guaranteed that it'll run at that refresh rate,and if it does there's a good chance that the panel will start dying on you at a faster rate than it would otherwise.

 

to find out how watch Linus' video

 

But it will only make a significant difference if you actually have over 60fps consistently,if you're hovering between 30-60fps the refrssh rate of your monitor being higher won't make any difference whatsoever.


Linus Sebastian said:

The stand is indeed made of metal but I wouldn't drive my car over a bridge made of it.

 

https://youtu.be/X5YXWqhL9ik?t=552

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not really. The "smoother gaming experience" is motion blur. If you have a true, well reviewed 120Hz monitor next to it, you'

ll notice, and you'll drop frames by the monitor, as the internal circuitry isn't actually fast enough.

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Goodluck with 144Hz lol unless your playing older gen games a single gtx780 wont consistantly drive 1440p at that refresh rate.

 

Realistically set it to 96-110Hz and enjoy.

 

If you use Toastyx's patch you still need to go into the nvidia control panel and set it to your new refresh rate.  Also Ive noticed after a restart it will sometimes revert back down to 60Hz


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Just go for something in between. I often play with my monitor set to 100hz with vsync on and the game looks smooth as butter, just go for ~90hz. It won't shorten the life of your GPU, it might do so on the monitor though.


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You GPU won't short it's the life.. monitor we don't know for sure.

 

Check for frame skipping: http://www.testufo.com/#test=frameskipping

 

Of course when you'll overclock the monitor, you'll get to enjoy motion blur, as the panel is not fast enough, so expect that.

 

Just stop posting, your information is never correct and to put it bluntly I'm sick of seeing it.

 

Every LCD has motion blur unless you have a lightboost monitor and you've dealt with the permanance issue that way.  Your motion blur will be significantly less at 120hz because the screen refreshes twice as fast so the frames are on the screen for half the time.  Motion blur, if you didn't know, is caused because LCD screens display a frame until the next one is drawn, unlike a CRT that projects the image and then a moment later is gone.  In other words, if you were to display just a single frame on an LCD the screen would just freeze and it would look like a still picture, on a CRT if you did the same thing you'd see the flicker (maybe) of the single frame being drawn and then the screen would go blank and just sit there.  The blur is caused by the transition of pixels from what they were in the previous frame to what they are going to be, there is no blur on a CRT because the screen is always black between frames.

 

Now let's talk about refresh rates.  A CRT monitor still has a delay between frames based on the refresh rate.  A 60hz refresh rate means a gap between frames of 16ms.  It doesn't matter how many frames you generate or how fast the response time is, there will always be a gap of 16ms.  Motion blur is only related to refresh rate as a side effect of how quickly (aka often) the screen refreshes on an LCD.  A 120hz monitor refreshes every 8ms, because it's faster the motion blur is less noticable on an LCD screen, a CRT would be no different for motion blur...but would still have the added smoothness and positional accuracy involved in the increased frame rate.

 

As for lifespan:  There is nothing that currently indicates a panel is even slightly affected by running at a higher framerate.  The panels actually have nothing to do with the refresh rate, just like the pixels have nothing to do with the refresh rate.  The PCB is what determines whether you can overclock or not.  There may be adverse affects related to running the PCB at a higher rate than it's intended, but literally NOTHING could happen to the panel itself.  It doesn't generate more or less heat, it just does what it's told.  Saying the "panel" might have issues is like saying the "pixels" on an LCD are difference than an LED, or that the pixels are different on an IPS vs a TN.  Hint:  they aren't.  Every LCD screen in the world (more or less) uses the same screens, the panels are different and the PCBs are different, but the screens are the same.

 

Finally, you can't overclock your QNIX to 144hz.  They don't go that high.  You might get to 120hz, but 96 or 110hz is more likely. I've had two (they sent me a matte on accident) and then I got my glossy one.  The first one overclocked to 96hz on my old machine, the glossy one clocks to 120hz on some games but gets scanlines on others.  I set it to 110hz and no problems at all.  No image retention, no heat, no flicker, no scanlines, it passes at the test site and drops zero frames.  People have been overclocking these monitors for over a year without any side effects.  If you're worried feel free to get a SquareTrade warranty for $50~ bucks for  3years.  At that point if something happend you already got your money's worth...

 

not really. The "smoother gaming experience" is motion blur. If you have a true, well reviewed 120Hz monitor next to it, you'

ll notice, and you'll drop frames by the monitor, as the internal circuitry isn't actually fast enough.

 

God.  Just stop.  The smoother gaming experience is because you have twice as many frames being displayed, so you see all the positions from the added frames.  It's how frame interpolation works on a TV to reduce motion blur except it's with ACTUAL frames generated by the game engine, not ones generated by a crappy algorithm in the TV where it *thinks* stuff should go.

 

There have also been countless people who have proven that the bypass models (qnix qx2710, xstar dp2710, yamasaki catleap 2b and overlord tempestOC) that have single inputs *ALL* display true 120hz without dropping frames.  The ones that drop frames are the displayport or multi-input models that have a different PCB and a scaler.  Also, it has nothing to do with the "circuitry" not being fast enough, that's absurd.  It's because even if you're using the DVI connection and not one of the extra inputs, and if you're running in native resolution (not using the scaler) there is still processing being done on the signal.  That processing, however minor, is long enough that the PCB can't keep up with a 120hz refresh rate...which is why the single input, no scaler models can reach true 120hz speeds.

 

If you stuck a BENQ TN panel gaming monitor at 120hz next to a QNIX overclocked to 120hz you'd see no difference at all (assuming no lightboost) between the two monitors. Period.  Now please stop with your misinformed, ridiculously wrong information.  Thanks.

 

EDIT:  I feel I should clarify my single frame reference.  The LCD screen wouldn't freeze indefinitely on the image...it would freeze until the next refresh.  So the CRT would display the images for < 1ms, the LCD would display it for 16ms.  That's an easier way to explain why 120 and 144hz lessen but not eliminate motion blur.  Go look at Blurbusters if you want an explanation, lightboost works because it flashes the backlight after 1.3ms which virtually eliminates motion blur.  It's highly unlikely we will ever get a true motion-blur free picture with an LCD, but lightboost is as close to CRT as technology permits.

 

I guess since I'm being throrough, I might as well add that you might get a tiny bit more motion blur on the Korean panel because the "respose" time is slightly slower than a fast gaming monitor.  But most gaming monitors even 1ms are only quoting best case GTG scenario's and not full transitions.  I'm not sure whether the QNIX and it's brothers at 8ms are quoting GTG or something else.  So the pixel response time might be slightly off, but the frame changing ever 8ms still lowers motion blur significantly from 60hz...regardless of response time.

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I've got a QNIX QX2710 and I got it up to 110hz before I ran into scan lines, but then suffered from image retention so I shoved it back down to 60hz. To be honest I'm not one of the people that can tell 100hz from 60hz, the difference is just too small for me to notice even at the best of times. Really all you need is to keep the framerate above 60hz and it will be a fine experience at that resolution (Though anything but a 690 or 7990 will struggle to keep the framerate above 60 in newer games).


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@aithos my information is correct. Yours are about providing false promises to people, leading to disappointed purchases.

 

Every monitor has motion blur. I have not said the contrary. But there is non-visible motion blur, and in my opinion, in your face motion blur.

If IPS panel could actually go at 120Hz, they would, long time ago. They can't. They are not fast enough. It's simple. LG was desperate on the TV race for 3D implementation... why they didn't do 120Hz IPS panels? They make them. The answer is obvious.

 

There is a difference between true 120Hz TN panel (a good one), and a overclock 120Hz IPS panel. Even people that overclock their QNIX agrees that the results are not as good as their true 120Hz monitor. So, stop with your buyer remorse.

 

And unlike you, I provide a tool to assure the best overclock-ability of the monitor, by not just overclocking it and calling a day, but to ensure that you have no frame drops. If you do some research, you'll see it's a problem.

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@aithos my information is correct. Yours are about providing false promises to people, leading to disappointed purchases.

 

Every monitor has motion blur. I have not said the contrary. But there is non-visible motion blur, and in my opinion, in your face motion blur.

If IPS panel could actually go at 120Hz, they would, long time ago. They can't. They are not fast enough. It's simple. LG was desperate on the TV race for 3D implementation... why they didn't do 120Hz IPS panels? They make them. The answer is obvious.

 

There is a difference between true 120Hz TN panel (a good one), and a overclock 120Hz IPS panel. Even people that overclock their QNIX agrees that the results are not as good as their true 120Hz monitor. So, stop with your buyer remorse.

 

And unlike you, I provide a tool to assure the best overclock-ability of the monitor, by not just overclocking it and calling a day, but to ensure that you have no frame drops. If you do some research, you'll see it's a problem.

 

I seriously don't know how you possibly got the "trusted advisor" award.  I'm just going to say this, and if I get warned so be it:  shut up.

 

I am not providing false promises or disappointing people.  You really need to go do some more research and understand what you're talking about before you argue.  Or if English isn't your first language...study up a bit and make sure you understand what I'm saying before you try to argue with me because there is a clear lack of comprehension on your part.  Now let's get to it:

 

1) "Every monitor has motion blur"  I never said that, I said every LCD without lightboost.  I've already explained this.  Motion blur can be caused by one of two things:  permanance related to LCD screens, and response time (full pixel transitions) being slower than the refresh rate.  CRT monitors, rear projection TVs and Plasma TVs have no motion blur.  None.  Their pixel response is lower than the refresh rate and the images are not permanent, they go away immediately and do not stay on the screen.  As for LCDs, yes, all LCDs with the exception of lightboost models will have some motion blur.  There is no such thing as non-visible motion blur, that's just ignorant.  You're trying to say that something not visible to the naked eye matters.  If with lightboost you have less than 1ms of permanence the motion blur is gone because the eye can't see it.

 

2) Again, the PANEL has NOTHING to do with the refresh rate.  The PCB does.  Read that again.  There are 4 parts to every computer monitor:  Screen (LCD, Plasma, etc), Panel (IPS, TN, VA, etc), Lighting (LED, CFL) and PCB.  The screen, has nothing to do with refresh rate, the panel has nothing to do with refresh rate, the lighting has nothing to do with refresh rate.  Only the PCB matters.  The PCB is what you hook your video card into and turns the signal into something that displays on the screen.  If the PCB is not fast enough to process the image at 120hz then the monitor will not be 120hz. 

 

Let me be even more specific:  If the panel mattered then you would be able to overclock EVERY SINGLE TN panel to 120hz.  Can you?  Any TN panel ever.  No.  You can't.  Because older TN panels have older PCBs, those old PCBs aren't fast enough to handle a 120hz signal.  The panel literally means NOTHING.  You could take a PCB out of a BENQ XL2420 and wire it up to a 10 year old LCD TN panel and run the monitor at 144hz.  Just like you can take a Yamasaki Catleap 2b PCB and put it with a Samsung PLS panel and run it at 120hz overclocked.  That's what Overlord's monitor is.  Scribby bought batches of Yamasaki PCBs and a bunch of A and A- LG panels and made his own monitor out of it.  It's literally a Yamasaki Catleap 2B, which is the same panel used in a bunch of other name brand monitors...including Dells, Asus, etc. 

 

The difference is that Dell, Asus, etc...all use a more complex PCB with multiple inputs, a scaler, etc.  THAT is why they can't do 120hz....those PCBs aren't capable of keeping up.  Period.  THE PANEL DOESN'T MATTER.

 

3) The *only* difference between an overclocked 120hz and a TN 120hz is that if the total transition response time is slower on the IPS you will get very slightly more motion blur because the panel can't keep up with the transitions.  It's still less than you'd get with a 60hz TN panel though, because a 60hz monitor is 16ms between frames and the 120hz overclocked monitors don't have a response time *that* slow.  You also saying "people with QNIX monitors agree the results aren't as good"  who said that?  I've been through thousands of pages in the QNIX/XSTAR owner forum and I've never seen anyone saying that.  I *OWN* one and I've never said that. 

 

I don't have buyer remorse.  The monitor I have is the best monitor I've ever seen.  It's amazing and I don't regret purchasing it at all.  The only way I'lll switch monitors again is if a 144hz lightboost glossy panel hits the market.  Also, you haven't provided any tools at all.  I have specifically listed the *ONLY* models that you can buy and overclock without dropping frames.  I know what they are, I have one.  I very specifically said that the DP and multi-input models CANNOT overclock.  You're confused.

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I've got a QNIX QX2710 and I got it up to 110hz before I ran into scan lines, but then suffered from image retention so I shoved it back down to 60hz. To be honest I'm not one of the people that can tell 100hz from 60hz, the difference is just too small for me to notice even at the best of times. Really all you need is to keep the framerate above 60hz and it will be a fine experience at that resolution (Though anything but a 690 or 7990 will struggle to keep the framerate above 60 in newer games).

 

You need to use it at the higher refresh rate for quite a while before your eye will notice the difference.  It's just like going from VHS to DVD or DVD to Bluray.  Sometimes you can see it right away and sometimes you need to use the better standard for a while before your eye will adjust and be able to see the difference easily.  The same thing applies for color quality, higher resolutions for gaming, etc.  You'll never sit down and be like "wow, I can really see those 1.5million extra pixels" immediately. 

 

As for image retention - easy fix is to swap back to 60 for normal use and only go to 110hz for full screen gaming.  The second I notice any retention on mine that's what I'll be doing, but generally I'm not spending long periods of time browsing the internet at home anyway...

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I'm getting really sick of these kinds of threads, so I'm done posting in this one.  People have no idea what they are talking about and insist on arguing with me when I provide clear, detailed information and they provide nothing to the contrary.  If anyone would like actual information or further clarification please PM me directly.  Thanks.

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Yea I think you have no idea what you are talking about, and unwilling to correct yourself. I have done so many times, and I have read a lot on it, including research paper, thanks to access at my university library. What have you done?

 

I also like the fact that you add false words onto people, such as me saying "response time".

And I am sorry, everyone could see the difference between VHS and DVD. I see a difference form DVD to Blu-ray on my 27inch CRT TV on component. You have to be upclose to notice it, but you do notice it. There is no such thing as "it takes time to notice".

 

As for your points

1), I know you haven't said that.. I am saying that. Lightboost tricks your visual cortex in not seeing the motion blur as much as you would otherwise see. Due to the flickering of the back light at low rate (ie: not fast enough), some people, even many, have headaches after prologue usage, much like those cheap CRT monitor that most people bought back in the days where it used inferior and only thin layer of phosphor to retain light, and only setting the monitor to <85Hz, giving a flickering. While light boost isn't has bad a 60Hz cheap CRT monitor, it non the less an issue to some. Much like people that have trouble using a PWM controlled back light LCD monitor.

 

2). You are confusing refresh rate and response time. Response time is the time for a pixel to change from one state to another. Refresh rate is how many frames a monitor can display. The panel has everything to do with response time. If the response time is too slow, then the monitor won't be able to response fast enough, and you'll get the blurry mess of the early color TFT LCD monitors for PC at the consumer level, where response time where just awful that even scrolling text made the text disappear a bit.

While circuitry does play a part, it's not the reason. Again, LG lost the 3D TV "race" because they could not manufacture 120Hz 3D IPS TVs.

 

 

Also:
If you have to yell, or tell people to shut up, and insult them, then you have lost the argument long ago.

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Yea I think you have no idea what you are talking about, and unwilling to correct yourself. I have done so many times, and I have read a lot on it, including research paper, thanks to access at my university library. What have you done?

 

I also like the fact that you add false words onto people, such as me saying "response time".

And I am sorry, everyone could see the difference between VHS and DVD. I see a difference form DVD to Blu-ray on my 27inch CRT TV on component. You have to be upclose to notice it, but you do notice it. There is no such thing as "it takes time to notice".

 

As for your points

1), I know you haven't said that.. I am saying that. Lightboost tricks your visual cortex in not seeing the motion blur as much as you would otherwise see. Due to the flickering of the back light at low rate (ie: not fast enough), some people, even many, have headaches after prologue usage, much like those cheap CRT monitor that most people bought back in the days where it used inferior and only thin layer of phosphor to retain light, and only setting the monitor to <85Hz, giving a flickering. While light boost isn't has bad a 60Hz cheap CRT monitor, it non the less an issue to some. Much like people that have trouble using a PWM controlled back light LCD monitor.

 

2). You are confusing refresh rate and response time. Response time is the time for a pixel to change from one state to another. Refresh rate is how many frames a monitor can display. The panel has everything to do with response time. If the response time is too slow, then the monitor won't be able to response fast enough, and you'll get the blurry mess of the early color TFT LCD monitors for PC at the consumer level, where response time where just awful that even scrolling text made the text disappear a bit.

While circuitry does play a part, it's not the reason. Again, LG lost the 3D TV "race" because they could not manufacture 120Hz 3D IPS TVs.

 

 

Also:

If you have to yell, or tell people to shut up, and insult them, then you have lost the argument long ago.

 

Sigh.  You have written a research paper?  Good for you.  I worked in sales and management for several major companies that carry the products.  I worked closely with reps from the major manufacturers of TVs and Monitors including:  Sony, Samsung, LG and all the people who make the panels and the screens.  I frequent tech forums where actual experts post like AVS forums, and I have a bachelors degree in computer science where I took several classes as electives involving electrical engineering.  My GFs brother is a patent lawyer working with companies like Samsung and his bachelors degree was in electrical engineering.  Even *he* bows to my knowledge of TVs and monitors because I'm what you call an expert.

 

Now let's clarify a few points again, because I can't let this go:

 

1) you cannot see a difference between DVD and bluray on a 27" TV with a componant connection.  27" CRT TVs are not high definition, they are 480p resolution.  Meaning it's the same number of pixels as a standard definition signal (480i) except the picture is progressive scan instead of interlaced.  Since I doubt you understand, interlace is when half the pixels on the screen are drawn in one pass and the other half are drawn in the second pass.  So a single frame takes two passes to draw.  Progressive scan is where the entire frame is drawn in one pass, it is slightly smoother (less flickering) but the picture is EXACTLY THE SAME.  The clarity is EXACTLY THE SAME.  The fact you would even imply that you can see a difference is stupid.  It's not physically possible.

 

2) Not everyone can see the difference between VHS and DVD or from 720p to 1080p.  I ran into people EVERY DAY when I sold TVs who couldn't.  Most people can't see the difference from 60hz to 120hz either.  It takes a trained eye and time to adjust to the greater quality before you can go back and see it clearly.  Go watch Linuses' blind test where they had a friend test 60hz vs 120hz and the guy gets it wrong virtually every time.  Then watch the followup where Linus takes the test and gets it right every single time.  That's how you prove things, not by stating them.

 

3) Lightboost does NOT trick your visual cortex, you're talking out of your ass.  I've already explained this, IN DETAIL.  Go re-read my posts, I am not rehashing it again and dumbing it down further so you can understand.

 

4) I am NOT confusing response time and refresh rate, you don't understand what I'm saying.  I can only assume your control of the English language is less than perfect or you just don't understand the concepts we are talking about.  I never said the panel doesn't matter for response time, I said it doesn't matter for REFRESH RATE.  The panel determines response time, the PCB determines refresh rate.  Response time is meaningless, the rating they put on monitors is GTG (gray to gray), only a full transition black to white matters.  If the response time is slower than refresh rate (in MS, not HZ) then you will get one cause of motion blur WHICH I ALREADY SAID.  If it is faster than the refresh rate, then it doesn't matter what it is, there will be no motion blur from that.  A 60hz refresh rate is 16ms between frames, 120hz is 8ms between frames...that's how quickly the screen refreshse.  That is what refresh rate is.  They just don't advertise it, because 60hz and 120hz SOUNDS more impressive and advertising in milliseconds would just confuse people about response rate further.  Which is understandable since YOU are confused.

 

5) The bigger cause of motion blur is the permanance of frames, I already explained this...I'm not doing it again.

 

6) LG never lost a 3d TV race, 3d TV is stupid and was never popular.  Also,  TVs don't use the same types of panels as monitors period...so it isn't relevant to the conversation.

 

I'm telling you to shut up because everytime you open your mouth something completely untrue comes out of it.  I've gone to great lengths to break this down in detail for you (and everyone else) and you JUST DON'T UNDERSTAND.

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yes I have a gtx 780 it will shorten the life span of the gpu or monitor and by how much

 

It will shorten the lifespan of your monitor because just like if you were to overclock your CPU or GPU it makes the chip and pixels run faster and thus they generate more heat (the monitor will also actually become brighter when overclocking) and thus the parts are going to wear out faster. CPU and GPU chips are designed to dissipate heat so their lifespan is not affected so much by overclocking as long as you have adequate cooling.

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It will shorten the lifespan of your monitor because just like if you were to overclock your CPU or GPU it makes the chip and pixels run faster and thus they generate more heat (the monitor will also actually become brighter when overclocking) and thus the parts are going to wear out faster. CPU and GPU chips are designed to dissipate heat so their lifespan is not affected so much by overclocking as long as you have adequate cooling.

 

That's not true.  These monitors get darker when they are overclocked, and they don't get hotter at all.  This isn't the same kind of overclocking as with a CPU where you are giving them more voltage and generating more heat.  This is more a function of the fact the PCB is too "stupid" to know it isn't supposed to run at 120hz, it's a fluke.  The panels and the screens have no problem running 120hz, there are IPS variations running 120hz on TVs too.  As I've said, it's the PCB, nothing else.  You could make an argument it *might* shorten the lifespan of the PCB, but the panel and the screen would be fine.  And the PCB can be replaced, that's what Overlord computers does.

 

But hey, you don't have one and obviously don't know much about it.  You shouldn't make assumptions about things based on an entirely different piece of hardware using the same general term of "overclocking".

 

edit:  If you want to prove it you should look into how heat is generated with voltage.  A CPU gets hotter when you overclock because you're giving it more voltage, or forcing it to run at a higher voltage within its accepted range consistently.  A monitor will not get hotter because you aren't modifying voltages at all.  Calling this "overclocking" is kind of a misnomer because all your'e actually doing is creating a custom resolution and forcing the monitor to run it.  You can play with the timings of the driver, but you aren't changing clock speeds, ratios or voltage.

 

This is NOTHING like overclocking a CPU and will NOT lower the lifespan of the panel.  Again, it might have negatives affects on the PCB, but really the only thing that might happen is the components on the motherboard might wear out slightly faster.  At the cost of these monitors, if you get several years warranty (3 year squaretrade 53 dollars) it WILL cover it.  People have specifically asked, because you aren't modifying hardware parameters, you're applying a driver change.  So you get 100% of your money back within 3 years...if it breaks after that...you've gotten your money worth.  It's only a couple hundred dollars.

 

Personally, I don't think there is any risk in overclocking these at all.  Except for image retention...that is definitely possible.

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Sigh.  You have written a research paper?  Good for you.

No, I have said I read research paper. Stop adding words to people.

I worked in sales and management for several major companies that carry the products.  I worked closely with reps from the major manufacturers of TVs and Monitors including:  Sony, Samsung, LG and all the people who make the panels and the screens.  I frequent tech forums where actual experts post like AVS forums, and I have a bachelors degree in computer science where I took several classes as electives involving electrical engineering.  My GFs brother is a patent lawyer working with companies like Samsung and his bachelors degree was in electrical engineering.  Even *he* bows to my knowledge of TVs and monitors because I'm what you call an expert.

 

Cool story bro.

1) you cannot see a difference between DVD and bluray on a 27" TV with a componant connection.

Yes you'll be surprised. And my CRT TV (Sony Triton Wega, the fancy model), can actually do 1280x1024 over component and S-Video. I know, because I already plugged a computer there.

Since I doubt you understand, interlace is when half the pixels on the screen are drawn in one pass and the other half are drawn in the second pass.  So a single frame takes two passes to draw.  Progressive scan is where the entire frame is drawn in one pass, it is slightly smoother (less flickering) but the picture is EXACTLY THE SAME.  The clarity is EXACTLY THE SAME.  The fact you would even imply that you can see a difference is stupid.  It's not physically possible.

 

I know what interlaced and progressive is, thank you.

Try a 4K Youtube video, and you'll see how it looks better than a normal 1080p video on your 1080p display.

2) Not everyone can see the difference between VHS and DVD or from 720p to 1080p.  I ran into people EVERY DAY when I sold TVs who couldn't.  Most people can't see the difference from 60hz to 120hz either.  It takes a trained eye and time to adjust to the greater quality before you can go back and see it clearly.  Go watch Linuses' blind test where they had a friend test 60hz vs 120hz and the guy gets it wrong virtually every time.  Then watch the followup where Linus takes the test and gets it right every single time.  That's how you prove things, not by stating them.

Well to bad for them. I know people they are perfectly happy with their TN panels 17inch 1024x768. They, don't want or care for larger. That doesn't change the fact of the situation.

3) Lightboost does NOT trick your visual cortex, you're talking out of your ass.  I've already explained this, IN DETAIL.  Go re-read my posts, I am not rehashing it again and dumbing it down further so you can understand.

Yes it does. Your explanation is wrong.

Do a google search and it's in your face: "Strobe backlight"

 

4) I am NOT confusing response time and refresh rate, you don't understand what I'm saying.  I can only assume your control of the English language is less than perfect or you just don't understand the concepts we are talking about.  I never said the panel doesn't matter for response time, I said it doesn't matter for REFRESH RATE.  The panel determines response time, the PCB determines refresh rate.  Response time is meaningless, the rating they put on monitors is GTG (gray to gray), only a full transition black to white matters.  If the response time is slower than refresh rate (in MS, not HZ) then you will get one cause of motion blur WHICH I ALREADY SAID.  If it is faster than the refresh rate, then it doesn't matter what it is, there will be no motion blur from that.  A 60hz refresh rate is 16ms between frames, 120hz is 8ms between frames...that's how quickly the screen refreshse.  That is what refresh rate is.  They just don't advertise it, because 60hz and 120hz SOUNDS more impressive and advertising in milliseconds would just confuse people about response rate further.  Which is understandable since YOU are confused.

You always have motion blur. Take a camera, a good one, and take a shot (set to manual at highest shutter speed). You might not see it, but it is still there, none the less.

 

6) LG never lost a 3d TV race, 3d TV is stupid and was never popular.  Also,  TVs don't use the same types of panels as monitors period...so it isn't relevant to the conversation.

 

You are right, LG uses a "special" kinda of IPS for their IPS TV... Riiiiiiight.

Who are you are trying to convince.

3D was a fad, and LG didn't sell as well as the others TV manufacture using different panel technology. LG manufacture, in fact is the largest supplier of IPS panels, in the world. That is what they do (I mean in their monitor/TV side), that is what they push, and that is what they use in their TVs.

I'm telling you to shut up because everytime you open your mouth something completely untrue comes out of it.  I've gone to great lengths to break this down in detail for you (and everyone else) and you JUST DON'T UNDERSTAND.

Yea I am getting annoyed by you. By spreading a lot of FUD, and adding words on people, and telling THEM that they don't know English.

When everyone is wrong except for you, as you said it yourself, you are wrong.

And as I already mentioned:

94fb7935fd219beb8c724e2e25c000cb816bedfa

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That's not true.  These monitors get darker when they are overclocked, and they don't get hotter at all.  This isn't the same kind of overclocking as with a CPU where you are giving them more voltage and generating more heat.  This is more a function of the fact the PCB is too "stupid" to know it isn't supposed to run at 120hz, it's a fluke.  The panels and the screens have no problem running 120hz, there are IPS variations running 120hz on TVs too.  As I've said, it's the PCB, nothing else.  You could make an argument it *might* shorten the lifespan of the PCB, but the panel and the screen would be fine.  And the PCB can be replaced, that's what Overlord computers does.

Finally, something of truth. Sadly, you use up the transparent transistors a lot more, than what they were designed to go, so they might eventually break at some point. All depends on the monitor. We have no information on this, as we need to wait for at least 5 years and start seeing if people that overclocked since day, have any problems afterwards. So, as everyone mentioned: "it MAY reduce the life span of the display".

But hey, you don't have one and obviously don't know much about it.  You shouldn't make assumptions about things based on an entirely different piece of hardware using the same general term of "overclocking".

 Hey, you don't need to be a jerk face with people.

 

Personally, I don't think there is any risk in overclocking these at all.  Except for image retention...that is definitely possible.

You "don't think there is any risk"... you have no exact fact, hence why we use the word may or potentially.
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Sigh.  Again.  I'm done.  GGWP, you're still wrong and you still didn't read my posts about what lightboost does, I pretty clearly explained that it flashed the backlight...it does it 1.3ms after the frame comes up to clear the screen instead of leaving the image up for the full 8ms between refreshes...it's the 10% setting.  It isn't tricking your cortex, it's making it so the pixel transitions are always black to something-else and not color-color.  That's why it gets rid of motion blur on panels with response times lower than the refresh rate...

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