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win10user10

best SSD SEEMS NEARLY COMPLETE ?? easiest part to pick out of all the parts ??

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Posted · Original PosterOP

a) the best price curve for ssd seems to be 128

price of ssd 128 is about ~60

 

https://pcpartpicker.com/trends/price/internal-hard-drive/

 

 

 

for the time being, just gonna go with one of these, that has 

 

a) highest rated on amazon +

b) has high sample size with many reviews 

 

first one doesnt, but someone said it was fine so w/e

 

120 30 https://www.amazon.com/Team-Group-120GB-Internal-T253TD120G3C101/dp/B075JMGCVW

500 45 https://www.amazon.com/Seagate-Gaming-2-5-Inch-Internal-ST500LM000/dp/B00B99JU5M

2tb 100 https://www.amazon.com/Seagate-FireCuda-Gaming-Solid-Hybrid/dp/B01IEKG2HM/

 

im assuming all these are ssd, i've no idea, there's no filter option (that i know of) for ssd ??

 

 

unless any ssd out of all of them is better?? 

and there's reliable evidence that show that something being better is actually accurate?

 

 

 

b) ssd gives basically no benefits to 80-90% of common things done (almsot nobody especially not i restarts the computer 100x a day),

but it doesnt cost much so it's w/e, just get a ssd unless you needed a very large size

and because of that,

ssd seems to be the single easiest part to pick out of all the parts

 

 

 

see primary post

 

 

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The best $/GB SSDs right now are 480/512 GB and 960/1TB drives, both are sitting at about 11 to 12 cents per GB. The cheapest 120/128 GB drive I would even consider currently is more than 18 cents per GB. Not to mention usable space after you've installed 40 GB worth of Windows to the drive.

 

Where did you hear/decide that an SSD isn't better than a HDD for most tasks? Load up GIMP on an HDD vs an SSD and tell me there isn't a benefit then. However, an NVMe SSD has minimal benefits over a SATA SSD for most people.


¯\_(ツ)_/¯

 

 

Desktop:

Intel Core i7-3820 | Corsair H100i | ASUS P9X79-LE | 16GB Patriot Viper 3 1866MHz DDR3 | MSI GTX 970 Gaming 4G | 2TB WD Blue M.2 SATA SSD | 2TB Hitachi Deskstar HDD | 1TB WD Black HDD | Corsair CX750M Fractal Design Define R5 Windows 10 Pro / Linux Mint 19 Cinnamon

 

Laptop:

Dell XPS 15 9560 4K Touch | Intel Core i5-7300HQ | 12GB Generic (Crucial?) 2133MHz DDR4 | Nvidia GTX 1050 | 256GB Toshiba M.2 NVMe SSD | Windows 10

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@win10user10

 

You're not actually asking any questions. If you're building a small computer, get a M.2 SSD (or NVMe) drive. 256 Gb is roughly the starting point. If you want more storage space, get a normal 2.5 SSD. 

 

Budget SSDs would be the Team Group L5 Lite 3D, Adata SU800 (budget drives), then Crucial MX500 and, the top dog, the Samsung 860 Evo.

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1 hour ago, win10user10 said:

a) the best price curve for ssd seems to be 128

wrong. 128GB SSD's are growing very close to 256GB SSD pricing, and they VERY cramped compared to 256GB.

 

1 hour ago, win10user10 said:

b) ssd gives basically no benefits to 80-90% of common things done (almsot nobody especially not i restarts the computer 100x a day),

yes and no. in essence you're right, it's only loading times, but it's also the loading times of just about everything, including every button you press in windows 10, every program you open, close, save, load, etc. also stuff like antivirus scans takes a HUGE benefit.

 

1 hour ago, win10user10 said:

c) there's been noise that ssd are decreasing in $

this.. and primarily the following statement:

1 hour ago, win10user10 said:

but it's all irrelevant

it seems like these are talking about larger sizes, and if so then it's completely irrelevant since those arent the best price curve so its irrelevant

the reason that to your eye it's "irrelevant" is because you'rte looking ALL THE WAY at the bottom end, where a lot of the price is just the base cost of "an SSD": manufacturing, the cost of the casing, the cost of the box it's shipped in, the logistics, the administrative overhead of having a company, etc. rather than the actual cost of the amount of storage that's on it.

when you look towards 256GB SSD's the price drop over the last year alone is immense, and ofcourse this difference grows as you look at bigger SSD sizes, because it's the cost per GB that's going down, not the cost of all the overhead to get that storage in a box on your doorstep.

 

as for your actual question for an SSD,

- get 256GB or more, you'll thank me later.

- recommending samsung is a "default" in the SSD space

- beyond that i've had good experiences with the kingson A400, sandisk ultra II, if you wanna go cheaper mushkin seems fine enough, and pretty much all HP gear i see has a toshiba SSD in it, so i guess those arent horrible either.

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Posted · Original PosterOP

type of ssd?

 

1. If you're building a small computer, get a M .2 SSD (or NVMe) drive. 256 Gb is roughly the starting point. If you want more storage space

2. However, an NVMe SSD has minimal benefits over a SATA SSD for most people.

 

well what in the world is the relative size here? one size is 30% of the regular size or? lacking such info here, ill just go with regular cos im assuming it doesnt matter

and that the marginal benefits doesnt outweigh the overall cost, or does it ?

i dont think it'll matter either way tho, or maybe it does ?

 

 

amount of ssd?

 

1.  If you want more storage space,

2. usable space after you've installed 40 GB worth of Windows to the drive.

 

would prefer what is actually needed, so 50? or 60?

but it's a minor preference


 

 

 

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Posted · Original PosterOP

recommendation option 

 

"as for your actual question for an SSD,

- get 256GB or more"

 

1. why exactly?

 

 

just notes:

"samsung is a "default" 

kingson A400, sandisk ultra II, if you wanna go cheaper mushkin seems fine enough"

 

 

1. "wrong. 128GB SSD's are growing very close to 256GB SSD pricing,

 

why is there a view that this is 'wrong'? where's are the graph/charts that shows that this is accurate?

 

2. and they VERY cramped 

 

what this mean?

 

3. including every button you press in windows 10, every program you open, close, save, load, etc... takes a HUGE benefit.

 

while the 'huge benefit' is specifically attributes to the anti-virus, let's just presume & assume that it's also attributed to the prior statement as well, then what do you think is a good link that shows that this claim is accurate?

 

4. the reason that

 

i dont see the relevance of this.

 or how any of this matters to the end goal or the question asked.

if in case this stuff has any relevance to this build,

then maybe a rephrasing of how this provides a helpful answer to the question asked would be good

 

 

 

 

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Posted · Original PosterOP

for the time being, just gonna go with one of these, that has 

 

a) highest rated on amazon +

b) has high sample size with many reviews 

 

first one doesnt, but someone said it was fine so w/e

 

120 30 https://www.amazon.com/Team-Group-120GB-Internal-T253TD120G3C101/dp/B075JMGCVW

500 45 https://www.amazon.com/Seagate-Gaming-2-5-Inch-Internal-ST500LM000/dp/B00B99JU5M

2tb 100 https://www.amazon.com/Seagate-FireCuda-Gaming-Solid-Hybrid/dp/B01IEKG2HM/

 

im assuming all these are ssd, i've no idea, there's no filter option (that i know of) for ssd ??

 

 

unless any ssd out of all of them is better?? 

and there's reliable evidence that show that it's accurate that something is actually better?

 

 

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