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Old Corsair HX620W in Budget Build

Hey guys! I am currently building a Ryzen 3 build (A very budget build to re-use my HD7950 since I got a cheap GTX680 that is also working but with 4GB of RAM) and I'd like to give it to my girlfriend.

I bought a used HX620W (Yes, I know, It is very old) but it looks brand new! And it only costed me 15 euro. With such a price, and knowing this PSU used to be a beast, I thought It would be fine, but after getting it I noticed that it only has 2x6 PCIE Express and the GPU I want to use in that build requires a 1x6 + 1x8 pin (6+2) and the PSU only has 2x6 PCIE Pins.

 

The build is the following:
Ryzen 3 1200 (which I wanna OC to like 4.0GHz)
Msi Twin Frozr III R7950 3GB/OC (which I'd love to try to OC a lil too, to squeeze some more performance)
ASROCK AB350M Gaming K4 / MSI B350M Bazooka (one of those, still deciding)
2x4GB DDR4 RAM (Probably around 3000MHz)
SSD 120GB + SATA 7.2K
A couple fans (3x120MM probably)
A Custom watercooling loop (CPU only, 1 pump, 1 240 rad with 2x120mm fans)
A couple led strips
Leave room for possible future OC or small upgrades (ryzen 3 to ryzen 5 in the next gen, etc)


WIth this said, I have the following questions:

Using such an old psu, it probably has what everyone calls the 'drop of wattage capability' as it ages, it provides less wattage than it was able initially.
This model seems to be from 2006 so that's like 12 years old. Even though it looks brand new. Is there anyway to see the manufacturing date of a PSU? Is the drop that hard? The psu, supposedly is able to carry out 3x18A in the 12V rail.

The PSU only has 2x6 PCIE but I need a 8 pin (6+2). Could I use a 6 pin PCIE to 6+2 pin PCIE cable or a 2x molex to 6+2 PCIE? Are those safe?


Should I try to cost losses in the HX620W (I have a friend who will take it for the same price I paid) and shell out a little more for a brand new PSU? I don't mind used hardware, but PSUs are one of those things that just .... you understand I hope. In this case, any budget PSU that you could recommend me for that build?

Thanks.

 

 

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A 12 year old PSU? You just wasted €15, even if it looks new from the outside. A PSU isn't just a magical metal box. Capacitors age. 

You should be able to find the manufacturing year and week somewhere. 

:)

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2 minutes ago, seon123 said:

A 12 year old PSU? You just wasted €15, even if it looks new from the outside. A PSU isn't just a magical metal box. Capacitors age.  

You should be able to find the manufacturing year and week somewhere.  

Yeah, capacitors age, but how severe is the actual drop in wattage? It already has a lot of room in terms of power needed, so any small drop in capability should still be able to sustain the rig. I have not wasted 15€ as I have a friend who actually said he would buy it from me for the price I paid for it.

 

The questions is more, should I resell it and buy a brand new PSU to keep a piece of mind?

 

If yes, what PSU could you recommend? I'm on a tight budget and scoring very good deals. I wouldn't mind a used PSU if it was probably newer too.

 

Thanks!

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2 hours ago, Haruka said:

I bought a used HX620W (Yes, I know, It is very old) but it looks brand new! And it only costed me 15 euro.

Hey, I bought these 15 year old dunlop tyres. Is it still OK to use them? They look brand new!!

 


Because for double that you could have gotten a somewhat OKish, new PSU - something like a 300W be quiet System Power or Pure Power.

"Hell is full of good meanings, but Heaven is full of good works"

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1 hour ago, Haruka said:

Yeah, capacitors age, but how severe is the actual drop in wattage?

Do you want to kill your PC or do you want to keep it?

That old piece of junk might be OK for a PC of that time, but combining old PSU with new technology is just stupid because the power consumption changed.

 

It is as severe as the softeners in rubber making the tyres hard and useless, especially in Rain. So you will kill your hardware with that ancient PSU because it is not made for the strong power fluctuations of  modern components.

 

So get a new, good quality one. Something decent is like 40€ or so. the worst you can get that's somewhat OK is like a be quiet System Power 9 or Xilence Performance A+ (530W because you need two PCIe connectors). 

 

And now you have spent half of that money on some useless shit that is only useful for some old retro PC...

"Hell is full of good meanings, but Heaven is full of good works"

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2 hours ago, Haruka said:

Yeah, capacitors age, but how severe is the actual drop in wattage? It already has a lot of room in terms of power needed, so any small drop in capability should still be able to sustain the rig. I have not wasted 15€ as I have a friend who actually said he would buy it from me for the price I paid for it.

 

The questions is more, should I resell it and buy a brand new PSU to keep a piece of mind?

 

If yes, what PSU could you recommend? I'm on a tight budget and scoring very good deals. I wouldn't mind a used PSU if it was probably newer too.

 

Thanks!

With the capacitors, it's not necessarily the wattage that's the worry, but rather the electrical performance. The ripple is the main thing. 

For a reasonably priced new PSU, there's the System Power 9 400W, Pure Power 10 400W, CX450M or Vengeance 400W. 

:)

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