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How to test psu?

I bought used psu.

How do I test it if it is good or not?

 

Please do not take offence for my apparent confusion or rudeness,it's not intent me to be like that,it's just my BPD,be nice to me,and I'll return twice better,be rude and usually I get easly pissed of...I'll try to help anyone here,as long as it's something I dealt with,and even if you think I'm rude or not polite,forgive me,  it's not me it's my BPD.

Thanks for understanding.

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1 minute ago, frozensun said:

I bought used psu.

How do I test it if it is good or not?

Do you want to stress test it or just turn it on?

Apprentice Software Developer

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2 minutes ago, Blasty Blosty said:

Do you want to stress test it or just turn it on?

I just want to check if it is working good/normal or not.

 

Please do not take offence for my apparent confusion or rudeness,it's not intent me to be like that,it's just my BPD,be nice to me,and I'll return twice better,be rude and usually I get easly pissed of...I'll try to help anyone here,as long as it's something I dealt with,and even if you think I'm rude or not polite,forgive me,  it's not me it's my BPD.

Thanks for understanding.

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If it's a standard ATX power supply, connect the 24 pin connector's green wire to any black wire (ground). That will make it power up so you can check the various rails with a multimeter.

 

Running a power supply with no load doesn't tell you much about its health, though. To really test it, you'd have to plug it into computer parts you won't mind wrecking if it turns out the power supply is bad.

I sold my soul for ProSupport.

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5 minutes ago, frozensun said:

I just want to check if it is working good/normal or not.

Then you can use something like a paperclip or any connected metal object to short the 24-pin connector on the psu. One moment, I will find a guide

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6 minutes ago, Blasty Blosty said:

Then you can use something like a paperclip or any connected metal object to short the 24-pin connector on the psu. One moment, I will find a guide

Yeah but that does not tell me much.

I would need to put some load on it, correct?I mean probably test it with computer parts as @Needfuldoer wrote.

 

Please do not take offence for my apparent confusion or rudeness,it's not intent me to be like that,it's just my BPD,be nice to me,and I'll return twice better,be rude and usually I get easly pissed of...I'll try to help anyone here,as long as it's something I dealt with,and even if you think I'm rude or not polite,forgive me,  it's not me it's my BPD.

Thanks for understanding.

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13 minutes ago, frozensun said:

Yeah but that does not tell me much.

I would need to put some load on it, correct?I mean probably test it with computer parts as @Needfuldoer wrote.

You need an actual psu tester to know.

 

What psu did you buy?

 

The only way to know is to have a proper xxxxx$ psu tester or sacrificial hardware of the same power budget as the destined rig.

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1 hour ago, jaslion said:

You need an actual psu tester to know.

 

What psu did you buy?

 

The only way to know is to have a proper xxxxx$ psu tester or sacrificial hardware of the same power budget as the destined rig.

BQ Dark Power 12 1000W, was good deal for 130 euros.

 

Please do not take offence for my apparent confusion or rudeness,it's not intent me to be like that,it's just my BPD,be nice to me,and I'll return twice better,be rude and usually I get easly pissed of...I'll try to help anyone here,as long as it's something I dealt with,and even if you think I'm rude or not polite,forgive me,  it's not me it's my BPD.

Thanks for understanding.

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2 hours ago, frozensun said:

BQ Dark Power 12 1000W, was good deal for 130 euros.

New? This is a well known very high quality PSU. 

 

Normally we just buy them and use them, you shouldn't need to do anything else. 

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7 hours ago, frozensun said:

BQ Dark Power 12 1000W, was good deal for 130 euros.

Its a high end overkill built psu good chance it works fine. Indeed not something to waste money on new at a 😛

 

 

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20 hours ago, GuiltySpark_ said:

New? This is a well known very high quality PSU. 

 

Normally we just buy them and use them, you shouldn't need to do anything else. 

Nope,used.That is why I want to test it somehow.

 

Please do not take offence for my apparent confusion or rudeness,it's not intent me to be like that,it's just my BPD,be nice to me,and I'll return twice better,be rude and usually I get easly pissed of...I'll try to help anyone here,as long as it's something I dealt with,and even if you think I'm rude or not polite,forgive me,  it's not me it's my BPD.

Thanks for understanding.

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The easiest way is to hook up a multimeter, backprobed, and connect the lines to a 12v power draw. I used to use a old lightbulb vanity with multiple bulbs that way you can load a certain amount of wattage with each bulb. Easy, effective and always works.

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