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Windows specific files from NTFS drive to ext4 - any issues?

Hi, I have a 'main' external drive where I host all my files, this is currently formatted to NTFS. This gets backed up now and again to other NTFS drives.

 

A few years ago I switched from Windows to Linux. I previously used Windows for many years, and have a lot of programs (.exe), and files backed up. I still have a few older Windows PCs I use to play games and I use a VM now and again.

I use Fedora as my main OS, this uses BTRFS. I read that, in general, ext4 would be a good choice for an external drive in Linux. NTFS performance seems slow in Fedora, so I am planning to reformat my 'main' drive to ext4.

 

The 'main' drive currently has Linux and Windows programs on the same drive.

 

My question is, if I reformat the NTFS drive to ext4 will any of my Windows specific files have any issues? I think there are potential permissions issues with certain files, but I have already tried an exFAT drive and any lost permissions were not an issue.

 

 

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If you still regularly use that drive with other Windows computers, they won't be able to read it anymore without clunky workarounds. It sounds like reformatting it as exFAT instead of ext4 is the way to go for you.

I sold my soul for ProSupport.

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Thanks @Needfuldoer exFAT works well, but I was concerned about the lack of journaling and other features.

 

I use exFAT or F2FS on external USB sticks, but for important work files etc. I think I'd feel safer with the newer file systems in the case of a power outtage or some other issue.

 

I was considering having a separate 'Windows' drive to keep anything Windows specific. But I do use Windows VMs on occassion and having the files on the same drive is more convenient.

 

Years ago I ran Mac OS and moved some files to a NTFS or FAT32 drive and a load of font files and programs were corrupted due to the incompatibilities.

Some Linux file systems supports characters that Windows does not but I don't think it's vice-versa.

 

So I think unless there are any likely file system issues I may just give it a go and cross my fingers, I still have several backup drives in case things go wrong.

 

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