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Where to buy EPYC 9004 Processors for updated "Jellyfish Fryer"?

Jefe533
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I am looking to build something like Linus' "Jellyfish Fryer" NAS, but hoping to use a newly released AMD EPYC 9004 series processor. I know these "launched" a few weeks ago but I don't see just the CPU available for purchase anywhere (not newegg, etc.). Does anyone know when/where we will be able to buy just the CPU?

 

Bonus question, which current AMD Epyc SKU is comparable to that used in the Jellyfish Fryer video? This is my first NAS build so not sure how many cores are under/overkill. And whether the cache amount matters.

 

 

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Epyc doesnt really end up on the shelves of consumer-faciing businesses.

 

i've recently bought an epyc CPU, and i had to delve deep into B2B 'optimized for IE11' webshops to find a business that wasnt taking 70% margin on Epyc CPU's.

 

it's also not a given that they will end up on 'publicly accessible' shelves any time soon, because server OEM's and datacenters buy them by quantities that even a newegg could never dream of flipping;

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1 hour ago, Jefe533 said:

This is my first NAS build so not sure how many cores are under/overkill.

A brand-new EPYC CPU is massive overkill.

 

So is the EPYC 7302P from the jellyfish fryer video.

 

Even LGA 2011-3 is overkill.

 

What exactly do you want the NAS to do? If you're just sharing files over SMB on a single Gigabit Ethernet connection, you can use pretty much anything made in the last 15 years and not notice a difference.

Dell owns my soul.

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28 minutes ago, Needfuldoer said:

A brand-new EPYC CPU is massive overkill.

 

So is the EPYC 7302P from the jellyfish fryer video.

 

Even LGA 2011-3 is overkill.

 

What exactly do you want the NAS to do? If you're just sharing files over SMB on a single Gigabit Ethernet connection, you can use pretty much anything made in the last 15 years and not notice a difference.

If he made an all nvme storage nas, and had 40 or 100gb networking along with several heavy users such as video editors editing directly off the nas I could see him needing an epyc.

 

As you said, it will depend on what he wants to do with it.

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28 minutes ago, Needfuldoer said:

A brand-new EPYC CPU is massive overkill.

 

So is the EPYC 7302P from the jellyfish fryer video.

 

Even LGA 2011-3 is overkill.

 

What exactly do you want the NAS to do? If you're just sharing files over SMB on a single Gigabit Ethernet connection, you can use pretty much anything made in the last 15 years and not notice a difference.

this too.

 

something else to add here, because i kind of skipped over everything except availability..

 

older gen epyc cpu's have lower idle power consumption because the IO die is more advanced (and by extension: more power hungry) each generation. if you just need much many lanes for PCIe SSD's and many sata controllers... even 1st/2nd gen epyc may be more suitable than 4th gen, because i expect the IO die to be absolutely MASSIVE (because 6 CCD's, more memory channels, more PCIe lanes, PCIe 5.0, ..)and the IO die doesnt sleep.. so wether you need all that or not, it's burning power.

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If you want to buy a current gen epyc, you're probably better off to buy a pre built server from Dell or Supermicro.

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11 minutes ago, Bdavis said:

If you want to buy a current gen epyc, you're probably better off to buy a pre built server from Dell or Supermicro.

depends on what you need really. if there's a cookie cutter epyc server available for your usecase - great. if your jam really isnt among there.. it might be worth just scouting a supermicro motherboard.

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I'm looking to have 2-3 video editors work with 8K material in real time. We are a post house, so doing color correction in DaVinci Resolve and retouching in Nuke, Flame, etc. So my use case is just like the Jellyfish, hence I found the Jellyfish fryer video and was just looking to replicate that build. Does core count matter for NAS purposes?

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Core count matters to some extent, but there is a point of diminishing returns. Clock speed is also very important. Storage speed is important, and Network speed is critical because it won't matter how fast your server is if your stuck accessing via gigabit Ethernet.

 

I would choose a cpu that is a good compromise between clock speed and core count. Typically the highest core counts come at the expense of clock speed. Usually there's a good all around choice that still has a decent number of cores and a high clock speed.

 

10gb networking would be the minimum I would use. 25, 40, or 100 gb would be ideal.

 

I would try and go all u.2 nvme for storage if possible. SAS SSDs would be my second choice.

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What is your budget?

 

What is your target capacity?

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3 hours ago, Jefe533 said:

I'm looking to have 2-3 video editors work with 8K material in real time. We are a post house, so doing color correction in DaVinci Resolve and retouching in Nuke, Flame, etc. So my use case is just like the Jellyfish, hence I found the Jellyfish fryer video and was just looking to replicate that build. Does core count matter for NAS purposes?

I can’t even explain how much of a better idea it would be to build a standard NAS for archival storage of cold projects, and just invest in NVMe drives for the 2-3 editors would be. Both from a performance and maintainability perspective…. Not to mention cost.

 

Linus has ~70+ employees at this point, so his deployment “sort of” makes sense due to how many people need to access media at the same time. But for a few editors, it doesn’t make any sense. 

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I'd try to get a company to help you that has experience with setting up networ storage for video editing. Thats gonna save you a lot of time tweaking and configurating the system yourself, and these companies have a lot of experience of setting up systems like this, much more than most people online.

 

 

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2 hours ago, LIGISTX said:

I can’t even explain how much of a better idea it would be to build a standard NAS for archival storage of cold projects, and just invest in NVMe drives for the 2-3 editors would be. Both from a performance and maintainability perspective…. Not to mention cost.

 

Linus has ~70+ employees at this point, so his deployment “sort of” makes sense due to how many people need to access media at the same time. But for a few editors, it doesn’t make any sense. 

I agree, it makes more sense to work on a file stored on the local editing machine then transfer it to the NAS when you're finished.

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Thank you for all of the thoughts. I did end up ordering almost exactly the parts list from the Jellyfish Fryer video. One benefit of not waiting for Epyc 9004 is that the DDR4 RAM was really cheap. Just $ 696.54 for 256 GB of the same RAM as in the video. Also got the HDDs themselves for cheap on Black Friday. $269/piece for Ironwolf Pro 16 TB.

 

One thing that tripped me up, though, was that the EPYC 7302P is actually a 16-core processor. In the video Linus mentions "24" cores a few times, but the on screen text in the video says "7302P". So I ended up just buying the 7302P, assuming 16-cores is enough, but a little odd. Either the text is wrong in the video or Linus misspoke.

 

fryer.thumb.jpg.7ef1e10de8f6990733da46da35123ae8.jpg

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Dang! Somebody with an actual use case for this kind of machine!

 

Can't wait to see the build log.

Dell owns my soul.

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