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gtx 460 on linux

I want to switch to Linux and when i built my computer I tried to install pop os but the resolution was stuck at 1028 x 763 since then i have installed windows and it has worked fine but recently I tried using a live USB and tried Ubuntu and mint when I selected the normal option to boot normally my monitor wen black and turned off the only way I could boot was with the compatibility option I can't switch my os right now since I need my computer but once I have more time I wanted to make the switch so my question is this is my computer compatible with Linux I have a ryzen 7 3700x, 16 gb crucial ram ,  samsung 970 evo plus ssd,  asus strix b550-f motherboard and a gtx 460 1gb

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Why in the hell do you have a gtx 460 in that system? Or do you mean rx 4/560?

 

iirc some newer cards only support uefi boot so on older boards that dont have uefi bios they dont work and you need to use a secondary card as a workaround, maybe something similar is happening here where it somehow works with the gtx 460 (i assume csm or something that allows legacy hardware compatibility) but it is not properly supported so its acting wonky af, but thats just my theory, the newest "desktop" computer i own is x58 aka flagship from 12 years ago so if i am wrong thats why xD

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3 minutes ago, Somerandomtechyboi said:

Why in the hell do you have a gtx 460 in that system? Or do you mean rx 4/560?

 

iirc some newer cards only support uefi boot so on older boards that dont have uefi bios they dont work and you need to use a secondary card as a workaround, maybe something similar is happening here where it somehow works with the gtx 460 (i assume csm or something that allows legacy hardware compatibility) but it is not properly supported so its acting wonky af, but thats just my theory, the newest "desktop" computer i own is x58 aka flagship from 12 years ago so if i am wrong thats why xD

The card was given to me by a relative and since it works fine I am planning to keep it until I have saved up enough to get a better one from what I have read the card does not support uefi and when I first booted the computer I got a message saying that the motherboard was using csm for the gpu I had not thought that that might be the problem but your probably right thanks for your help.

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17 minutes ago, StalePie42 said:

I want to switch to Linux and when i built my computer I tried to install pop os but the resolution was stuck at 1028 x 763 since then i have installed windows and it has worked fine but recently I tried using a live USB and tried Ubuntu and mint when I selected the normal option to boot normally my monitor wen black and turned off the only way I could boot was with the compatibility option I can't switch my os right now since I need my computer but once I have more time I wanted to make the switch so my question is this is my computer compatible with Linux I have a ryzen 7 3700x, 16 gb crucial ram ,  samsung 970 evo plus ssd,  asus strix b550-f motherboard and a gtx 460 1gb

 

Normal behavior. Boot in compatibility mode, install the Nvidia driver and all should be fine when you reboot in normal mode. Same thing happens when booting really new hardware too.

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I think it might have something to do with csm because I tried installing pop os some time ago and it all went fine but I could not install drivers 

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1 hour ago, StalePie42 said:

I think it might have something to do with csm because I tried installing pop os some time ago and it all went fine but I could not install drivers 

Pretty sure that is correct, but I believe most distros still support legacy boot.  What happened when you tried to install drivers? 

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10 minutes ago, OhioYJ said:

What happened when you tried to install drivers? 

I did not try installing drivers on mint but on pop os I just kept getting errors

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4 minutes ago, StalePie42 said:

I did not try installing drivers on mint but on pop os I just kept getting errors

The errors may point you to missing dependencies.

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44 minutes ago, OhioYJ said:

The errors may point you to missing dependencies.

I will keep that in mind next time I try installing linux

 

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2 hours ago, StalePie42 said:

I did not try installing drivers on mint but on pop os I just kept getting errors

In order to understand your issue, can you write here the output/error?

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Posted (edited)
On 5/26/2022 at 8:47 PM, FUIT1985 said:

In order to understand your issue, can you write here the output/error?

when using the pop shop: Error while installing package: installed nvidia-dkms-390 package post-installation script subprocess returned error exit status 10

when using the terminal: No drivers found for installation

when I used the nvidia-smi command: NVIDIA-SMI has failed because it couldn't communicate with the NVIDIA driver

when I used sudo apt upgrade: Errors were encountered while processing:
                                                    nvidia-dkms-390
                                                    nvidia-driver-390
                                                    E: Sub-process /usr/bin/dpkg returned an error code (1)

 

Edited by StalePie42
forgot to quote
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  • 2 weeks later...
On 5/27/2022 at 12:30 PM, StalePie42 said:

when using the pop shop: Error while installing package: installed nvidia-dkms-390 package post-installation script subprocess returned error exit status 10

when using the terminal: No drivers found for installation

when I used the nvidia-smi command: NVIDIA-SMI has failed because it couldn't communicate with the NVIDIA driver

when I used sudo apt upgrade: Errors were encountered while processing:
                                                    nvidia-dkms-390
                                                    nvidia-driver-390
                                                    E: Sub-process /usr/bin/dpkg returned an error code (1)

 

You did not perform the installation procedure correctly. I recommend that you repeat the installation of the nvidia driver. Some guides mistakenly recommend "forcing" the installation, but it's a workaround that in nvidia's case doesn't work.

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9 hours ago, FUIT1985 said:

You did not perform the installation procedure correctly. I recommend that you repeat the installation of the nvidia driver. Some guides mistakenly recommend "forcing" the installation, but it's a workaround that in nvidia's case doesn't work.

How should I have done the installation?

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Posted (edited)

Installation is not impossible, but it is tricky the first time. I followed several guides on the official Debian website and on Arch website. In practice I did this: create your xorg.conf file from tty2 automatically and check if it works with the generic noveau driver (then return to the graphical interface for the test - if it doesn't work, go back to tty2 to customize it); return to tty2 to disable the noveau generic driver (with a configuration file); search with nvidia-detect your nvidia driver; edit xorg.conf file for nvidia cards; install nvidia driver, Cuda, dependencies etc. with APT; update the system image and grub; reboot.

 

Edited by FUIT1985
Nvidia with Debian
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On 5/26/2022 at 5:27 AM, StalePie42 said:

The card was given to me by a relative and since it works fine I am planning to keep it until I have saved up enough to get a better one from what I have read the card does not support uefi and when I first booted the computer I got a message saying that the motherboard was using csm for the gpu I had not thought that that might be the problem but your probably right thanks for your help.

At that point use the integrated graphics if you have them.

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2 hours ago, foehammer127 said:

At that point use the integrated graphics if you have them.

I don't

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Posted (edited)
Quote

You can use function keys Ctrl+Alt with function keys F3 to F6 and have four TTY sessions open if you choose. For example, you could be logged into tty3 and press Ctrl+Alt+F6 to go to tty6.

Remember: I don't know pop os & I don't know if this tutorial works with pop os... 

From TTY you don't need to stop the X-server... 

 

1) login in TTY and check BusID of your video pcie card... 

$ lspci | grep -i vga

01:00.0 VGA compatible controller: NVIDIA Corporation GP106 [GeForce GTX 1060 6GB] (rev a1)

2) With nouveau driver - create a skeleton x.org file, copy the file to the correct location; reboot the machine and through heuristics check if the x.org file works with the graphical interface; if it don't work, login again in tty and with nano edit the file according to your needs... 

$ sudo Xorg :0 -configure && sudo cp /root/xorg.conf.new /etc/X11/xorg.conf

3) for example... 

$ cat /etc/X11/xorg.conf

Section "Device"
    Identifier             "Screen0"
    Driver                 "nouveau"
    BusID                  "PCI:1:0:0"
EndSection

And with nano edit it... So... 

$ sudo nano /etc/X11/xorg.conf

save the file and exit from nano, using respectively: Ctrl + o; Ctrl + x.

4) login again in TTY, remove first everything that point to any existing nvidia installation... and update the system... 

$ sudo apt-get remove nvidia* && sudo apt-get autoremove && sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install dkms build-essential linux-headers-$(uname -r)

5) if you want a support for 32 bit programs... 

$ sudo dpkg --add-architecture i386 && sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install lib32z1 lib32ncurses5 && sudo apt-get update

6) from TTY make a blacklist file for the nouveau driver with nano

sudo nano /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist-nouveau.conf

And add the following lines:

blacklist nouveau
blacklist lbm-nouveau
options nouveau modeset=0
alias nouveau off
alias lbm-nouveau off

7) from TTY prepare the x.org.conf file for the nvidia driver, replacing the term "nouveau" with "nvidia"

$ sudo nano /etc/X11/xorg.conf
Section "Device"
    Identifier             "Screen0"
    Driver                 "nvidia"
    BusID                  "PCI:1:0:0"
EndSection

 

8) Disable the Kernel nouveau

$ echo options nouveau modeset=0 | sudo tee -a /etc/modprobe.d/nouveau-kms.conf

9) check the driver for your nvidia card

sudo apt install nvidia-detect && sudo nvidia-detect

10) install your nvidia driver... 

$ sudo apt install nvidia-driver nvidia-cuda-toolkit

11) upgrade initramfs image and grub; after reboot

$ sudo update-initramfs -u && sudo update-grub && sudo reboot

12) check if your nvidia card works... 

$ sudo nvidia-smi 

 

Edited by FUIT1985
If you have NVIDIA graphics, you can download the Pop!_OS ISO with the proprietary NVIDIA driver preinstalled.
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3 minutes ago, FUIT1985 said:

Remember: I don't know pop os & I don't know if this tutorial works with pop os... 

From TTY you don't need to stop the X-server... 

 

1) login in TTY and check BusID of your video pcie card... 

$ lspci | grep -i vga

01:00.0 VGA compatible controller: NVIDIA Corporation GP106 [GeForce GTX 1060 6GB] (rev a1)

2) With nouveau driver - create a skeleton x.org file, copy the file to the correct location; reboot the machine and through heuristics check if the x.org file works with the graphical interface; if it don't work, login again in tty and with nano edit the file according to your needs... 

$ sudo Xorg :0 -configure && cp /root/xorg.conf.new /etc/X11/xorg.conf

3) for example... 

$ cat /etc/X11/xorg.conf

Section "Device"
    Identifier             "Screen0"
    Driver                 "nouveau"
    BusID                  "PCI:1:0:0"
EndSection

And with nano edit it... So... 

$ sudo nano /etc/X11/xorg.conf

save the file and exit from nano, using respectively: Ctrl + o; Ctrl + x.

4) login again in TTY, remove first everything that point to any existing nvidia installation... and update the system... 

$ sudo apt-get remove nvidia* && sudo apt-get autoremove && sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install dkms build-essential linux-headers-$(uname -r)

5) if you want a support for 32 bit programs... 

$ sudo dpkg --add-architecture i386 && sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get install lib32z1 lib32ncurses5 && sudo apt-get update

6) from TTY make a blacklist file for the nouveau driver with nano

sudo nano /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist-nouveau.conf

And add the following lines:

blacklist nouveau
blacklist lbm-nouveau
options nouveau modeset=0
alias nouveau off
alias lbm-nouveau off

7) from TTY prepare the x.org.conf file for the nvidia driver, replacing the term "nouveau" with "nvidia"

$ sudo nano /etc/X11/xorg.conf
Section "Device"
    Identifier             "Screen0"
    Driver                 "nvidia"
    BusID                  "PCI:1:0:0"
EndSection

 

8) Disable the Kernel nouveau

$ echo options nouveau modeset=0 | sudo tee -a /etc/modprobe.d/nouveau-kms.conf

9) check the driver for your nvidia card

sudo apt install nvidia-detect && sudo nvidia-detect

10) install your nvidia driver... 

$ sudo apt install nvidia-driver nvidia-cuda-toolkit

11) upgrade initramfs image and grub; after reboot

$ sudo update-initramfs -u && sudo update-grub && sudo reboot

12) check if your nvidia card works... 

$ sudo nvidia-smi 

 

Thanks of going to all this effort I will definitely try this.

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On 6/11/2022 at 6:15 PM, FUIT1985 said:

 

I have not yet had time to try out your solution but I tried it in a live environment again but this time with a 1920x1080 monitor and both Linux and the uefi bios where at the same resolution with black bars around the screen but then when I switched to windows it went to native resolution and a friend of mine told me it could be the dvi cable I just wanted to know your opinion before I buy a new cable .

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36 minutes ago, StalePie42 said:

I have not yet had time to try out your solution but I tried it in a live environment again but this time with a 1920x1080 monitor and both Linux and the uefi bios where at the same resolution with black bars around the screen but then when I switched to windows it went to native resolution and a friend of mine told me it could be the dvi cable I just wanted to know your opinion before I buy a new cable .

It is simple. If with Windows the display configuration works correctly, the cable is not the source of the problem. Obviously the resolution depends on the version of the cable. For example an hdmi 1.4 cable is compatible with a Full HD resolution. I looked for your video card specifications. It should have a mini hdmi output (if your monitor also has an hdmi input). If you choose a higher version ask if it is backwards compatible. In any case, your video card allows a resolution no higher than 1920x1080 (30 fps).

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23 hours ago, FUIT1985 said:

It is simple. If with Windows the display configuration works correctly, the cable is not the source of the problem. Obviously the resolution depends on the version of the cable. For example an hdmi 1.4 cable is compatible with a Full HD resolution. I looked for your video card specifications. It should have a mini hdmi output (if your monitor also has an hdmi input). If you choose a higher version ask if it is backwards compatible. In any case, your video card allows a resolution no higher than 1920x1080 (30 fps).

You were right I tried Manjaro and it worked fine on the live usb and nvidia-smi also worked

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1 hour ago, StalePie42 said:

You were right I tried Manjaro and it worked fine on the live usb and nvidia-smi also worked

So you haven't bought a new cable and you are finally able to install the nvidia drivers. 😉

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