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Help ethernet wall jack RJ45 has weird colors

I got this cheapo ethernet jack that doesn't have normal colored wires. It has white, brown, yellow, green, blue, orange, black, red 

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That my friend is a cat 3 outlet you may if very lucky (and a card that supports it) 100baseT more likely 10baseT link.

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12 minutes ago, Electronics Wizardy said:

Im getting phone cabeling vibes from that. You sure its made for ethernet? Its it label cat 5e or cat 6?

 

Screenshot_20220118-200507.png

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12 minutes ago, Corkers said:

That my friend is a cat 3 outlet you may if very lucky (and a card that supports it) 100baseT more likely 10baseT link.

 

Screenshot_20220118-200507.png

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1 minute ago, Xlpr said:

 

Screenshot_20220118-200507.png

Get the ones that say cat 5e or 6 depending on the cables your using. 

 

Or just get the crimp on connectors. 

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The outlet pin out you can figure out the order as view looking at a plug clip on underside and point towards you is once you establish which terminal correspond to the pin you can work out which color goes where. 
 

1. orange/white -

2.orange -

3.green/white -

4.blue -

5.blue/white -

6.green -

7.brown/white -

8.brown.

 

Now whether or not this is worth your effort in so far as if it will work at all is dependant on many factors the length of the run being a major one and how much interference is introduced by the very sub optimal outlet that was generally intended only for phone (POTS / ISDN / PABX) applications. 
 
for a history lesson on why such a product exists: 

 

As tech moves forward there is always a progression in networking coax tv style cable was widely utilized (relatively - not many businesses needed more than one pc and those that may have more didn’t necessarily need networks as the data sharing needs were infrequent and it was sneakernet was cheaper so that was fine.

 

The first widely used coax solutions was called Thicknet and 10base5 it used a thick coax that connected to a transceiver which was then connected via an AUI port on the computer.
 

This was more challenging to terminate and reliable connection were important and this was left to the pros as a result it was more expensive to implement.

 

Then we saw thinnet or 10base2 which used a much thinner coax. Which was cheaper and more flexible and I did come across an installation that use a flexible coax (the inner conductor was stranded). The system used bnc connections (think old cctv camera connectors) and you connected via a tee directly to the pc network port, at each end of a segment a terminator was installed (a BNC connector with a 50 ohm resistor attached).
 

Both used a bus topology and this was a limitation but easy to manage because every pc on a segment sees the same thing only the pc with the address in the message responded this made collision easy to deal with don’t send if the cable is busy. It was limited to 32 nodes I think, but while now days that would be a huge problem there weren’t many places that it was.  
 

This was also a difficult system to make changes to the layout with as each pc was connected to pcs on both sides or one side at each end. 

 

then we got 10baseT all off the above is only to illustrate the evolution of networking. 10baseT was the shift to star topology and is similar to what most networks look like today. As with any tech new to the market the components were expensive and this creates markets for less expensive options. The cat5e (or above) is actually quite complex the twist rates of each pair are different and while these day they make miles of the stuff there was a lot of r&d that needed to be done. At some point the cost of cat5 cable got to a point where it was competitive with cat 3 voice cable and “future proofing” became part of the sales process. The price of the data outlets remained higher than the those suited to voice outlets and so we have these. They were uncommon in my experience and I only saw them with telephone carriers data networks. But while I made changes to 10base2 networks I never deployed a new one by the mid 90s writing was on the wall.

 

Interestingly in Australia the only people that could legally install cables that connected to or could be connected to the telephone network (which essentially they all did) was the Government owned monopoly Telecom later Telstra and this was sold off and as a result the cabling was then a licensed and regulated system sparkys could do attend training and be certified to install. 

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I meant to add. At some point 10baseT and possibly 100baseT compatibility was dropped so it is possible that the network devices may not be able to form a stable link at a rate that both the nic and switch support. Buy the bits from fs.com or similar. It may cost more but it will be cheaper in the long run. 

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And beware the claims made on websites that sell products of this nature, I would be astounded if a 90m cat 5 link with these outlets would pass certification. Also they would be much slower to fit off when compared to an idc solution. The thing that many people may not think of is a network connection has very sophisticated error checking and will always try and get the message through but this can slow the entire network even with switches because if the link to a device on a sub optimal link is talking to a server or a external device it means that regardless of the suitability of everything else in the network the slowdown and delays caused by the errors still occupy the good link to the server.
 

*What this scenario looks like will depend on the class of device and functionality of the specific device used the switch / router / hub.  

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