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Can modified sine wave inverters damage a PC?

Hello, I am looking to run my computer (uses about 270W-320W) from a 12V 500W modified sine wave inverter and I was wondering if doing so could damage my power supply or create stability issues for my computer. Does anyone here have experience when it come to using modified sine wave inverters to run computers for a long time? Thanks for your time.

 

I will be using this inverter (Green Cell 12V 500W).

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It says it produces a pure sine wave, but how true is it?  The closer it is to a square wave the the more high frequency 'filth' it will have on the waveform.  What you need to do is see the output waveform UNDER LOAD on an oscilloscope to gauge how 'pure' it is.   So try to find a helpful TV or electronics repair shop and pay them to let you see what the output looks like.  If it is a square wave output, in theory, they should be able to build you a Low Pass filter box to create a more curved sine wave-like output.

Or you could have it feed into an UNINTERRUPTABLE POWER SUPPLY (a second-hand one with no battery should be quite cheap, and use the non-battery back-up terminals) as well, as they usually have circuitry to 'clean-up' the mains supply.

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It should be fine. 

 

if the power supply has Active PFC circuit, it will boost the AC input voltage to around 400v DC and then convert that down to 12v and the other voltages. 

The Active PFC circuit will be a bit more "stressed" with that simulated sine wave input, compared to receives sine wave input ... but if you're not running the power supply at nearly 100% it will be fine. 

 

This being said... not sure how much I'd trust a 50 euro inverter. I'd suggest looking for something better. 

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3 minutes ago, mariushm said:

It should be fine. 

 

if the power supply has Active PFC circuit, it will boost the AC input voltage to around 400v DC and then convert that down to 12v and the other voltages. 

The Active PFC circuit will be a bit more "stressed" with that simulated sine wave input, compared to receives sine wave input ... but if you're not running the power supply at nearly 100% it will be fine. 

 

This being said... not sure how much I'd trust a 50 euro inverter. I'd suggest looking for something better. 

Surely the PFC will just modify the switching time and duty cycle to ensure that the input voltage and current are in phase, rather than shaping the waveform itself?   A squarewave in will still be a squarewave out...

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The x-factor is what the PSU mfg says.  I'd wager that most desktop PSU's actually indicate compatibility with modified sine-wave power.  If the PSU mfg says it will handle it, then it should be fine.

 

Similar considerations apply with UPS compatibility.  It was something I looked into before I bought my Eaton, to see if my EVGA was going to work with it.

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