Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Soldering iron help

tinpanalley
 Share

I probably wouldn't use it on a regular basis but I can think of about 5-6 different projects right now around the house that would benefit from a soldering iron. And another couple of times per year over the past decade where having one would have been useful. But I would prefer, as I do everytime I buy tools like this, to have something that can work well as an all purpose rather than an entry level that I'll want to upgrade from in the future. And I'd like a stand personally. Can someone help me direct myself towards an iron that would be good for me? It's usually simple things like wires, simple logic board repair, etc.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a soldering iron.  They don't get very technical as it is.  Of course there is the old Radio Shack special that you would spend $4.99 on but if you want to spend spend a few extra bucks and get a couple of extra tools in the process you could go for something like the iron I have posted below.

 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Soldering-Iron-Kit-Tool-Adjustable-Temperature-Desoldering-Pump-60W-110V/264480050544?hash=item3d943d4d70:g:mTkAAOSws0Vdjn0~

 

Another major decision you might want to think about is whether you want a "soldering IRON" or a "soldering GUN".  Only you can decide what you want and what will work best for you.  Since I am an electronics tech, I have one of both, an iron and a gun.  That way I can decide what will work best for the job at hand.

 

Good Luck

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd suggest going ahead and investing in an actual soldering station. Not that expensive to get and will last you for years, plus more versatile than a pen itself would be if you get a 2-1 setup (Airwand and pen).
Got mine for well under $100 US and has been worth every penny of it.
 

It's something you'll never really outgrow as you learn and improve your soldering skills with.

Been using an 862+ station for the past few years and it's been good overall, the only gripe would be about the body of the soldering pens eventually cracking up due to the heat due to them being plastic but that takes awhile to happen. Be sure to get one if you do with several different tip styles too, you'll find that to be useful in certain situations for versatility based on what you'll be doing at any given time.

Good luck.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

22 hours ago, kb5zue said:

It's a soldering iron.  They don't get very technical as it is. 

 

Another major decision you might want to think about is whether you want a "soldering IRON" or a "soldering GUN".  Only you can decide what you want and what will work best for you.  Since I am an electronics tech, I have one of both, an iron and a gun.  That way I can decide what will work best for the job at hand.

 

Good Luck

 

Definitely an iron. I grew up with a soldering gun in the house so I know how they work but the little jobs I need it for are more iron related. I like the idea of a kit like that.

19 hours ago, Beerzerker said:

I'd suggest going ahead and investing in an actual soldering station. Not that expensive to get and will last you for years, plus more versatile than a pen itself would be if you get a 2-1 setup (Airwand and pen).
Got mine for well under $100 US and has been worth every penny of it.
 

It's something you'll never really outgrow as you learn and improve your soldering skills with.

Been using an 862+ station for the past few years and it's been good overall, the only gripe would be about the body of the soldering pens eventually cracking up due to the heat due to them being plastic but that takes awhile to happen. Be sure to get one if you do with several different tip styles too, you'll find that to be useful in certain situations for versatility based on what you'll be doing at any given time.

Good luck.

So what exactly is an 862+ station? Is that a brand? I like, from what I've learned doing research, the idea of having different tips.

 

I asked elsewhere and was told to get a Hakko 508-1/P as a simple model for someone starting out. But i have to admit, I believe a bit more in getting something you can grow into when I buy tech/gear.

I found this model here but I was told it wasn't ideal for a number of reasons and was then recommended the Hakko FX888D, or Weller WE1010. Honestly, I'm a bit lost.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

On 5/3/2020 at 9:26 AM, tinpanalley said:

snip

If you are not in EU, then Hakko FX-888D is a great small station capable of lots of things. There are also lots of tips available for this station.

 

If you want something super compact, then look at TS80 or TS100. Great Chinese units with support for 3rd party firmware. T80 is weaker and uses USB with QC 3.0 power supply and has only 2 tips. TS100 is a more powerful, has more available tips and it uses barrel jack connection for power. There are many videos on YT available which feature those 2 units.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

On 5/3/2020 at 6:34 PM, tinpanalley said:

Definitely an iron. I grew up with a soldering gun in the house so I know how they work but the little jobs I need it for are more iron related. I like the idea of a kit like that.

So what exactly is an 862+ station? Is that a brand? I like, from what I've learned doing research, the idea of having different tips.

This is an example of the one I have but there are other types of 2-1 stations you can find.
BACOENG 2in1 SMD Soldering Station 862D+ (Improved Version of 852 and 862) 739770994881 | eBay
862+/862D+ is just a type/model of station but most any will do.
Get what has what you'd need such as an assortment of different style tips an so on as said before and most importantly don't overpay!
You shouldn't have to pay $100 or more to get one, in fact should be a nice bit cheaper - I paid $57 shipped for the last one I bought.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

I bought a chinese 8586 Soldering station for around £30 a few years ago, expecting it to blow up in a few months, but I still have it and it still works. Though to be fair I only use it maybe once a month. If you're short on money it's honestly not a bad choice.

 

 

REMILIA Mk.IIIC CPU: Ryzen 9 3900X, Cooler: Arctic Freezer II 240, RAM: 4x 8Gb sticks of Patriot Viper Steel Series 3600 CL17, Mobo: AsRock X570 Taichi, GPU: Asus RTX 2080 Dual, Storage: 512gb Silicon Power A80 NVME SSD (boot drive), a few 1TB and 512gb SATA/NVME SSDs for game storage, 6 hard drives 1-4 TB, PSU: Corsair RM750 MY2019, Case: Cooler Master Mastercase 5 MC500 (with add-ons), PCIE Cards: Cheap Chinese Marvell 88SE9215 4 port SATA card, Monitors: ViewSonic Elite XG270QC (165hz, 1ms MPRT, 1440p, VA, Freesync PP, pneumatic stand), Hp Z27n (IPS, 60hz, 1440p, 8Ms), iiyama G2530HSU-B (75Hz, Freesync, one in landscape, one in Portrait, all on pneumatic monitor stands), Mic: iSK UPM-1 USB XLR interface with Neewer NW700, Audio: Sabaj A3 160W DAC/AMP + Wharfdale Diamond 220 + Mission MS6 Sub, ifi Zen DAC, ifi Zen CAN, Littledot Mk.II (w/ Soviet Power tubes and British Mulard M8100s/Soviet Voshkod 6JP-EV/ American General Electric JAN 5654W dependent on mood), Sendy Aiva, Beyer Dynamic DT990 250ohm Black Special Edition, Audeze EL-8 Open Back, Mackie MC450, Sony MDR-CD900ST (w/ YaxiPad stPad2-LR) Sennheiser HD598SE (modified to be a headset, snapped headband held together with gorilla tape), Philips Fidelio X2HR (with thicc Chinese lambskin pads), Takstar Pro82, Mouse: Corsair Nightsword, Keyboard: Glorious GMMK ISO with Kailh Box Navys

 

KOAKUMA Mk.IB (24/7 Folding Slave PC made of spare parts): CPU: Core i7 4770, Cooler: Some small antex cooler with 80mm fan, RAM: 2x 4Gb Sticks of 2400Mhz DDR3, Mobo: Asus H81i-Plus, GPU: R9 390 Nitro+ (barely fits in case), Storage: 256gb Korean no-name SATA SSD, PSU: Corsair CX550 (Gray label), Case: Antec ISK600 ITX case.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share


×