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Posted · Original PosterOP

So I have this (hypothetical) idea of how I could water cool my laptop. I’d make a custom waterblock using CAD and machine milling it and blah blah blah until I got an input and output for water to flow.
 

Sounds great. But now how am I gonna cool the stuff? Well I have this idea of actual mounting what would be the radiator and fans to the back of laptop so it can all be still self contained. I’d mount it against the back of it so it still retains some kind of sleekness to it but how do I do that without cutting off the airflow? I’d need something like what some GPUs have. A blower style radiator. But to my knowledge nothing like that exsists. Any solutions that doesn’t involve making it it’s own unit or making it stick out a bunch?

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You're going to have to consider the addition of a considerable amount of weight being added to the hinge in two facets; shortened lifespan, and the potential that it will be unable to support the weight.

Second to that, you're going to have to find a way to mount the radiator to the top cover in a way that won't interfere/cause damage directly to the panel.

Aside from that, adding a spacer and giving the fans room to breathe is the next best option that I can come up with. Adding a blower to a radiator is asking a lot of a relatively small fan, which is likely to get quite noisy.

From a tinkering standpoint, I can certainly see the curiosity in taking on a project like this, but from a practical perspective, It's going to be far more effort than it's worth.


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13 minutes ago, Semper said:

From a tinkering standpoint, I can certainly see the curiosity in taking on a project like this, but from a practical perspective, It's going to be far more effort than it's worth.

Semper has a great reply here, basically I do the same thing for fun occasionally. It doesn't make sense to do it, but you do it to see if you can. I

I think you'll also find that it won't be as effective as you need. I'd be more interested in you creating a DOC for the laptop that connects with disconnect fittings and contains the RAD and pump for the system inside. I guess you'll run into problems there too though, after you replace the main heatsink it would be difficult to cool without the pump... 

I'd love to see what you settle on though. 

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Posted · Original PosterOP
42 minutes ago, Semper said:

You're going to have to consider the addition of a considerable amount of weight being added to the hinge in two facets; shortened lifespan, and the potential that it will be unable to support the weight.

Second to that, you're going to have to find a way to mount the radiator to the top cover in a way that won't interfere/cause damage directly to the panel.

Aside from that, adding a spacer and giving the fans room to breathe is the next best option that I can come up with. Adding a blower to a radiator is asking a lot of a relatively small fan, which is likely to get quite noisy.

From a tinkering standpoint, I can certainly see the curiosity in taking on a project like this, but from a practical perspective, It's going to be far more effort than it's worth.

 

13 minutes ago, Mbowen said:

Semper has a great reply here, basically I do the same thing for fun occasionally. It doesn't make sense to do it, but you do it to see if you can. I

I think you'll also find that it won't be as effective as you need. I'd be more interested in you creating a DOC for the laptop that connects with disconnect fittings and contains the RAD and pump for the system inside. I guess you'll run into problems there too though, after you replace the main heatsink it would be difficult to cool without the pump... 

I'd love to see what you settle on though. 

Yeah both of you guys see what I’m going for here. Although it’s completely impractical it would still be something cool. As Semper said it would ware on the hinges. However I recon if you did it right and got the balance of the weight it wouldn’t put to much strain on it. I think your right just a simple spacer would be best for it. Mbowen your comment about a pump and reservoir, I actually think it would be pretty easy to implement the pump into the rad. And as it’s a laptop I recon that the water just in the system would be enough for it. The only issue I would have is getting small enough parts for it. As like I said being so small it wouldn’t need a full sized radiator or pump. 

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9 minutes ago, Ndwolfy780 said:

Mbowen your comment about a pump and reservoir, I actually think it would be pretty easy to implement the pump into the rad. 

I'm all for custom solutions. Love the idea. But the problem you're going to run into here is just how custom this is actually going to be. Lets say you went for a truly small design on the radiator, what fans would you use? For the sake of this discussion, Noctua is one of the best fan makers at the moment we'll say that you could use 2x 40mm noctuas on each end giving it the total dimensions of 40mm x 80mm.

There are now a couple of things that you're going to have to do. That are universal to making this kind of project

Find a radiator you want to chop up. You're not going to find a small radiator to fit this kind of niche. Alphacool makes some pretty small ones that I used before, but they pretty much stop being useful to this design at 80mm. (Choosing a thinner rad may also help you, usually the thinner the radiator the higher the fin density.) In order to do this you're going to need to find a way to direct air down a long tunnel filled with the radiator tubes and fins. (Figure 1)

Normally I would suggest chopping a bigger rad and fabricating the ends (to close up the return loop) yourself, but this kind of fabrication would probably require tig welding because of the size. Each of the fin tubes would need to be moved and reconnected. (figure 2) As you might assume this would be a massive amount of work unless you can find something similar to modify. Denned actually replied with the closest current rad that I've seen in production.
 

14 minutes ago, Denned said:


Even if you managed to do all of this, you're going to need to leak check the ever living SH*T out of it. Tig can be hard and you can actually melt through the side of what you're working with really easily, (might close the pipe too). 

If I were you, I'd suggest using the rad Denned suggested and seeing if you can integrate that into the design. Most of the time AIOs use DC-LT impeller pumps. Alpha cool sells them individually if you're interested. They even provide a 3d rendering if you want it. Just don't ask them how you need to introduce it into a design to get it to work. Actually sent 3-4 emails to different people over there and nobody knows. (lol) You can find super sff pump toppers for them made out of plexi/acrylic if you need one though. 

I'd love to know your gameplan, I kinda enjoy this sort of engineering.

Rad.png

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Posted · Original PosterOP
7 hours ago, Denned said:

Actually that would be my best bet. 

 

7 hours ago, Mbowen said:

  

I'm all for custom solutions. Love the idea. But the problem you're going to run into here is just how custom this is actually going to be. Lets say you went for a truly small design on the radiator, what fans would you use? For the sake of this discussion, Noctua is one of the best fan makers at the moment we'll say that you could use 2x 40mm noctuas on each end giving it the total dimensions of 40mm x 80mm.

There are now a couple of things that you're going to have to do. That are universal to making this kind of project

Find a radiator you want to chop up. You're not going to find a small radiator to fit this kind of niche. Alphacool makes some pretty small ones that I used before, but they pretty much stop being useful to this design at 80mm. (Choosing a thinner rad may also help you, usually the thinner the radiator the higher the fin density.) In order to do this you're going to need to find a way to direct air down a long tunnel filled with the radiator tubes and fins. (Figure 1)

Normally I would suggest chopping a bigger rad and fabricating the ends (to close up the return loop) yourself, but this kind of fabrication would probably require tig welding because of the size. Each of the fin tubes would need to be moved and reconnected. (figure 2) As you might assume this would be a massive amount of work unless you can find something similar to modify. Denned actually replied with the closest current rad that I've seen in production.
 


Even if you managed to do all of this, you're going to need to leak check the ever living SH*T out of it. Tig can be hard and you can actually melt through the side of what you're working with really easily, (might close the pipe too). 

If I were you, I'd suggest using the rad Denned suggested and seeing if you can integrate that into the design. Most of the time AIOs use DC-LT impeller pumps. Alpha cool sells them individually if you're interested. They even provide a 3d rendering if you want it. Just don't ask them how you need to introduce it into a design to get it to work. Actually sent 3-4 emails to different people over there and nobody knows. (lol) You can find super sff pump toppers for them made out of plexi/acrylic if you need one though. 

I'd love to know your gameplan, I kinda enjoy this sort of engineering.

Rad.png

Like you said Mbowen making my own custom rad would be near impossible. And that’s why I would keep looking to avoid that. And this little gem arrived and I could easily integrate that. Thank you denned! 

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What you are describing is similar to this production laptop.

Asus made the GX700VO which has two ports on the back of the laptop that close when undocked.

 

When Docked the Water Cooled system is completed and there are two radiators installed in the Dock with Fans to cool down all the laptop components.

Idea is getting the heat out of the laptop and slow spinning fans making less noise but able to dissipate the heat.

 

They did a newer model the GX800VO

 

https://www.asus.com/Laptops/ROG-GX800VH-7th-Gen-Intel-Core/

 

 


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Posted · Original PosterOP
On 1/22/2020 at 2:50 PM, Maticks said:

What you are describing is similar to this production laptop.

Asus made the GX700VO which has two ports on the back of the laptop that close when undocked.

 

When Docked the Water Cooled system is completed and there are two radiators installed in the Dock with Fans to cool down all the laptop components.

Idea is getting the heat out of the laptop and slow spinning fans making less noise but able to dissipate the heat.

 

They did a newer model the GX800VO

 

https://www.asus.com/Laptops/ROG-GX800VH-7th-Gen-Intel-Core/

 

 

Im not acually trying to make some kind of dock or seperate device that goes with the laptop to cool it. Im trying to intergrate it completely. so there is no dock or other device. Its all self contained and still a fundamental laptop just cooled by water instead. 

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