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Questions in regards to cooling 2080ti?

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Hey,

 

not sure if it shows, i'm new to this forum, and new to watercooling (other than installing an AIO, i assume that doesn't count). I've read quite a bit in the last few days about watercooling, pros and cons, all that - and figured that i actually don't really need to use a water cooling solution on my current hardware (i7 6700k, 980ti). The 980ti is just too old for me to invest a few hundred bucks into it, and the 6700k runs perfectly stock on a DH-15, couldn't be happier.

 

Here's the thing. I'm in the market for a new GPU soon, and i decided that if i look at a 2080, i might as well look at a 2080ti. My current 980ti (MSI Gaming 6g) doesn't actually run "hot" in the sense that i get close to thermal throttling, but 70 degrees in games is more than i want to see. I know that the card is perfectly fine at these temperatures (they might even be on the lower side from what i've read, for a stock cooler), i just don't like it. 

 

So, now i'm waiting for EVGA or someone else to release a waterblocked 2080ti, and go from there. And that's actually it - i like how the DH-15 performs, the CPU reaches 59 degrees celsius maximum (no delid, no nothing) in long gaming sessions - no need for more (for now). 

 

So, my question is, should i look at a "kit" solution, that includes pump, reservoir, tubing, fittings etc or should i get everything handpicked? Or asking differently: are EKWB kits worth the money or could i do either cheaper for the same quality somewhere else, or better for the same money somewhere else? 

 

The card comes equipped with a waterblock, so i'd need a D-5 Pump, a reservoir of my choosing that fits/looks nice, tubing (i saw someone recommending a brand that had an X in it, forgot it though - halp?), fittings (recommendations?) and a radiator - correct? What thickness would i look at for a radiator, preferably either a 280mm if sufficient (i have zero idea how to math out what kind of radiator i'd need for a 2080ti), or a 420mm? Any recommendations there, or manufacturers to look out for?

 

That so far is it, again, i'm not looking at maximum anything, i usually don't overclock and if i do, only mildly, i like my system to be quiet (like DH-15 level of quiet), and i'd like to see temps of around 55 degrees on the GPU. Is that doable, too much to ask, etc - what do you guys think?

 

Cheers.

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2 minutes ago, m4inbrain said:

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This was the most level headed post I've read in a while, very refreshing to see somebody who has clearly done some research and thinking. I think a Hybrid GPU may be in your interest range too since they also run very cool and quietly but without the hassle of setting up a custom loop.

 

https://www.msi.com/Graphics-card/GeForce-RTX-2080-Ti-SEA-HAWK-X/Gallery

 

Otherwise EKWB kits are fairly good value for money, although there isn't really a GPU only loop option (maybe the MLC lineup has something to offer).

 

WSince GPUs have a big die, moving to water will have fairly noticeable differences in temperatures very quickly.

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Fyi, both msi and gigabyte offer 2080ti's with waterblocks.

Msi seahawk ek x

Gigabyte aorus xtreme

a person with an AIO liquid cpu cooler installed on his brains.

 

Just Kidding

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Cheers mate, 

 

yeah i saw those hybrid cards, and while technically you're correct, they'd absolutely be what i need (though i'd prefer a less dinky radiator, i got the space and the bigger the radiator, the less the fans have to work). Here's my problem with these.

 

As i mentioned, i installed AIOs before (H110, and two H115). The reason why i installed three AIOs and still ended up with a DH-15 (probably the best purchase i've made for my sanity in terms of computer parts) is that the H110 had, i assume, somewhere an airbubble - the temps were nowhere near what i should've gotten allegedly (on the 6700k), it ran in games up to 85 degrees celsius, that didn't even remotely work for me. Corsair tried to fix it by telling me to run it in all kinds of weird positions, which i did, didn't help. I then thought screw it, there's a bigger one - bigger is better. Bought the H115, dead on arrival, pump didn't work. Sent that to corsair, got a replacement kit, which lasted roughly 6 months, and then that pump died too. 

 

At that point i've just plain given up. Sure i could've RMAd that one too, but i still have it in the garage in my old parts box. Ordered a DH-15, peace of mind ever since - for the CPU. I was at the point where i was so desperate that i was thinking of delidding and LMing my CPU to get decent temps, and as it turned out, was never needed.

 

With a hybrid card, i can't just replace the cooler with an old one and RMA it - i'd be without GPU for an RMA once it dies. The upside of a custom loop to me in this case isn't "better performance", it's "being able to service it". If my pump dies in a custom loop, i replace it, and back to being happy. If it dies in a hybrid card (especially not knowing what kind of pump it is, and more importantly, with my history of/with AIOs).. Well i'm kinda shafted. At least that's my thought process, which might be flawed, but that's where i'm at currently. 

 

edit:

 

@above, i didn't mean to imply that i'm set on the EVGA, it was just the first one that came to mind. Cheers for the info though, i like my current MSI card so that's something i'll absolutely look into. 

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23 minutes ago, m4inbrain said:

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Okay, I respect your resentment against AIOs. Since you're looking to do a GPU only loop these are my takehomes:

 

- Most kits are CPU loop orientated and include a CPU block, perhaps this is a waste of money for you, therefore no kit route may be better, hand picking parts are better performance too.

 

- With a GPU only loop, anything above 240 mm will be plenty of headroom, so a 280 or a 420 or a 360, anything is suitable as long as it fits into your case

 

My personal recommendations for companies:

 

Pump - Anything that is a D5 (EKWB, Watercool for example)

Fittings - Bitspower, EKWB, Alphacool, Primochill, Monsoon etc etc - personally recommend either Bitspower or EKWB

Tubing - Get it from the same company as the fittings, minimize risk of incompatibility

Coolant - EKWB or Mayhems

Radiator - HardwareLabs, EKWB (not the SE series though), Alphacool (usually dirty inside, but otherwise good)

 

Radiator thickness depends on what you can fit, I thin if you can get a 40 mm radiator in, that tends to be the sweet spot. 30 mm Radiators are a bit more picky, and some are not so good (like the EKWB SE). 60 mm radiators are often too fat for cases. Remember you need to add 25 mm for a standard fan on top of the radiator.

 

Products to avoid:

Primochill Vue - Will clog

Thermaltake Pacific RL radiators - Aluminium

EKWB SE radiators - bad performance

 

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Cheers man, exactly what i need, very helpful. 

 

Much appreciated. 

 

One last thing, by chance, a company that makes tubing that has an X somewhere - you got any idea? It was something like XKDC or something? It's of course not that (funny as they are), but i have that stuck in my head and for the life of me i can't figure out where i saw it. 

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Just now, m4inbrain said:

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XSPC, not bad company I believe, but I don't know much about them or their products.

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Jeez, yes, that's it. 

 

Getting old. 

 

Just for me to confirm, temps below 60 degrees celsius should be realistic, with a radiator at either 280 or 420mm (i got 140mm noctuas spare)? I mean it of course depends on the block, but in general? That's all i need/goal, i don't want to see 60s anywhere. While being around the volume of a DH-15? 

 

edit: stock clocks of course, and 60 degrees not in benchmarks but gaming. 

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1 minute ago, m4inbrain said:

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Yes, I think that is very realistic. Usually GPUs will be well under the 60s in a standard loop. Infact it needs to be for the following reason:

 

GPU temperatures are often equal to the water temperature because of the large die size at idle (as opposed to CPUs that have a very high heat density). Under load it also doesn't really go beyond 10-20 degrees of the water temp.

 

Watercooling pumps must be kept cool for them not to fail, and that temperature is 60 degrees for most pumps. So it is imperative that you keep your fluid temperature below 60, and thus your GPU is likely to also be below 60 as well. If a GPU is over 60 in a custom loop, usually indicates bad installation of the waterblock.

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I'll be honest, i actually didn't know that 60 degrees is basically danger to manifold. I don't think that was stated in the how to's, stickies and all the other stuff i've read. 

 

But that's what i'm here for, in the end - even if i make myself look like a dummy here and there, if that prevents my baby from melting, so be it. 

 

That said, out of interest, is a pump/reservoir combo more efficient since the pump is at least partially submerged (if i saw that correctly), instead of sitting somewhere along the loop? My plan was to get a tube pump/reservoir combo if possible (while making sure that the pump is a D-5, that one is set in stone), and then basically just run tubing to card and radiator, with maybe a display for water temperature (if not too restrictive, would need to read up on that). 

 

Also, in regards to fittings, is there an acknowledged standard, as in "rather barbed than compression" or are both equally good? From a laymans perspective, the compression fittings look nicer, so i'd look for those instead of barbed ones, but i'd rather go with the "better" alternative than the "prettier" one, since the loop itself is originally planned for pretty pragmatic reasons.

 

Next i'm gonna watch all kinds of videos to actually lay a plan out, because i know i'll get annoyed with myself and the water cooling once it comes to maintenance and i've done something stupid because i had a lazy. Draining, and efficiently so, doesn't seem to be that big a topic when i browse through reddit and forums. I'm old, convenience >> performance. 

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3 minutes ago, m4inbrain said:

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Yes it should be space saving unless in really weird cases. If a pump/res combo fits, I would do that. Otherwise a seperate reservoir is no problem, you just have to make sure that the reservoir comes directly before the pump and is physically above it so water will flow into the pump. You can even omit the reservoir if you're brave, but that means filling the loop will be a pain (pump will break if spun dry).

 

If you have an MSI or ASUS motherboard, you can also think about integrating a temperature probe with a 2-pin output and have that plugged into the motherboard so that you can use it as a temperature source for fan control. I have all my fans react to the fluid temperature to achieve a very nice sound profile on my system.

 

Compression are better and prettier, so if you can afford it, go with compression fittings. Barbs are only superior in price.

 

Setting up a drain is often done by integrating a T-splitter, two male-to-male fittings, a ballvalve, and a stop plug. This should be set up in the lowest point of the loop and for the most efficient draining, you loop should not have any "U"'s since the water will not be able to make it beyond the lowest part of the U and therefore will cause a bit of grief when dismantling.

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Compression fittings it is then, good for me since i like those a lot more. 

 

I do have an ASUS board, that actually might be a good idea - though, i'll be honest, this here: 

 

 


frame3.jpg?format=1500w
 

 

does kinda tickle my fancy. 

 

I'll read up and watch reviews etc on that kind of stuff though. Not gonna run the loop without reservoir either, while i'm sure it's technically possible, a reservoir just is more convenient and probably safer too, since airbubbles are less of a problem. I'd assume. 

 

In regards to "U" in the loop, that's something i've already read about and will be considered when planning. Is running an inline-filter in the loop reasonable, or just a waste? In regards to draining again, i've seen "stoppers" for T-Fittings (stunning ones at that) - that should work too, or not? Have a random T Fitting low in the loop, plugged off, and once i get to draining it's basically like the oil change in a car, screw the stop out and catch can?

 

edit: nevermind, i'm stupid. I didn't read properly what you've said. I didn't know that T-Fittings don't directly go into the loop but need two male fittings, only occured to me when i looked at one. Makes sense now. 

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1 minute ago, m4inbrain said:

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With tempsensors, you can always plumb multiple ones in via splitters they have no impact on the flowrate. Inline filters are a bit of a waste since there is nothing to clog if you set it up right, and if you have things that will clog, an inline filter won't save you anyway. Yes, this is my drain setup for reference.

 

20180210_141248.jpg

 

Its plumbed in in the basement of the case, and when I come to use it, I unscrew the end stop plug, attach a hose via a spare fitting (ball valve prevent liquid from spewing as soon as you unplug).

 

20170828_094316.thumb.jpg.2d28a97c22040c8e4eac830b93fea5fc.jpg

 

I have some extra U's in my build now for aesthetics, but before the maintenance it used to drain fairly well without any additional pain. You can see in the video below.

 

 

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Cheers,

 

yeah that's definitely less painful than what i had in mind, consider me sorted on that front. I'll be honest, it's not the prettiest thing i've ever seen, but since looks is just a side effect for me, i don't care that much. I don't think i've got as much space in my (soon to be) new tower, i'm not sure that i could hide it in the bottom without "modifying" the shroud that goes over the PSU. If i see that correctly, you can basically hide your entire "hardware" there, including pump etc. I do have to keep in mind that my CPU pretty certainly will stay aircooled, so i don't necessarily want to fiddle too much with the internals since i usually have no idea what i'm doing anyways. 

 

Or, that's another possibility, keep an eye out for a new tower that ticks both boxes (good airflow and vasts amount of space while still being compact-ish, lol). 

 

I didn't entirely get the part with the splitter though, do you mean use the temp sensor as an "endpoint"? Isn't a splitter in itself a restriction, sort of? Or am i looking at the wrong fittings (basically Y splitters)? The sensors i saw were "inline" sensors. 

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7 hours ago, m4inbrain said:

Cheers,

 

yeah that's definitely less painful than what i had in mind, consider me sorted on that front. I'll be honest, it's not the prettiest thing i've ever seen, but since looks is just a side effect for me, i don't care that much. I don't think i've got as much space in my (soon to be) new tower, i'm not sure that i could hide it in the bottom without "modifying" the shroud that goes over the PSU. If i see that correctly, you 

You can also get stip plug style fittings that can just probe the reservoir, for example.

 

Youll find space. Typically you can slide the pump res sideways under the graphics card unless youre doing sli like i am.

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