Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Help me understand: 6-Phase CPU VRM vs Doubled 3-phase

 Share

Hello all,

 

Hate to start another topic on B450 motherboards, but I have a very specific question:

 

Comparing the Asrock B450 ITX board and ASUS ROG Strix B450 ITX boards. Will use a 2600X at stock speeds with it. I am concerned about CPU throttling and the 2600X not being able to sustain XFR2 boost clocks with bad VRM.

 

- Asrock has a 6+2 VRM, but it is actually a doubled 3-phase for the CPU

- Asus has a true 6 phase VRM (not doubled) for the CPU as far as I can tell.

 

The other features of the boards are very similar. Both have shown to have good heatsinks on the VRM in reviews, with good thermals.

 

The Asus board is WAY more expensive $150, vs $90 for the Asrock on sale. Is the true 6-phase VRM worth the extra cash? I might upgrade to a Ryzen 3000 CPU in the future, is the doubled 3 phase on the Asrock going to hold me back?

 

Thank you!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, maartendc said:

I am concerned about CPU throttling and the 2600X not being able to sustain XFR2 boost clocks with bad VRM.

Why? I have never heard of such issues.

HAL9000: AMD Ryzen 9 3900x | Noctua NH-D15 chromax.black | 32 GB Corsair Vengeance LPX DDR4 3200 MHz | Asus X570 Prime Pro | ASUS TUF 3080 Ti | 1 TB Samsung 970 Evo Plus + 1 TB Crucial MX500 + 6 TB WD RED | Corsair HX1000 | be quiet Pure Base 500DX | LG 34UM95 34" 3440x1440

Hydrogen server: Intel i3-10100 | Cryorig M9i | 64 GB Crucial Ballistix 3200MHz DDR4 | Gigabyte B560M-DS3H | 33 TB of storage | Fractal Design Define R5 | unRAID 6.9.2

Carbon server: Fujitsu PRIMERGY RX100 S7p | Xeon E3-1230 v2 | 16 GB DDR3 ECC | 60 GB Corsair SSD & 250 GB Samsung 850 Pro | Intel i340-T4 | ESXi 6.5.1

Big Mac cluster: 2x Raspberry Pi 2 Model B | 1x Raspberry Pi 3 Model B | 2x Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

no, the price difference is more of the asus fee rather than the vrms

PC: CPU: i5-9600k - CPU Cooler: be quiet! Dark Rock Pro 4 - GPU: Sapphire Radeon RX 5700 XT 8GB GDDR6 - Motherboard: ASRock - Z370 Extreme4 - RAM: Team - T-Force Delta RGB 16 GB DDR4-3000 - PSU: Corsair - TXM Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply - Case: Thermaltake - Core G21 TG

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

Both motherboards will have no problems whatsoever handling a 2600X at stock speeds. The ASUS board might get you a slightly higher stable overclock, but you'd need a really lucky chip to actually get there.

Don't ask to ask, just ask... please 🤨

sudo chmod -R 000 /*

What is scaling and how does it work? Asus PB287Q unboxing! Console alternatives :D Watch Netflix with Kodi on Arch Linux Sharing folders over the internet using SSH Beginner's Guide To LTT (by iamdarkyoshi)

Sauron'stm Product Scores:

Spoiler

Just a list of my personal scores for some products, in no particular order, with brief comments. I just got the idea to do them so they aren't many for now :)

Don't take these as complete reviews or final truths - they are just my personal impressions on products I may or may not have used, summed up in a couple of sentences and a rough score. All scores take into account the unit's price and time of release, heavily so, therefore don't expect absolute performance to be reflected here.

 

-Lenovo Thinkpad X220 - [8/10]

Spoiler

A durable and reliable machine that is relatively lightweight, has all the hardware it needs to never feel sluggish and has a great IPS matte screen. Downsides are mostly due to its age, most notably the screen resolution of 1366x768 and usb 2.0 ports.

 

-Apple Macbook (2015) - [Garbage -/10]

Spoiler

From my perspective, this product has no redeeming factors given its price and the competition. It is underpowered, overpriced, impractical due to its single port and is made redundant even by Apple's own iPad pro line.

 

-OnePlus X - [7/10]

Spoiler

A good phone for the price. It does everything I (and most people) need without being sluggish and has no particularly bad flaws. The lack of recent software updates and relatively barebones feature kit (most notably the lack of 5GHz wifi, biometric sensors and backlight for the capacitive buttons) prevent it from being exceptional.

 

-Microsoft Surface Book 2 - [Garbage - -/10]

Spoiler

Overpriced and rushed, offers nothing notable compared to the competition, doesn't come with an adequate charger despite the premium price. Worse than the Macbook for not even offering the small plus sides of having macOS. Buy a Razer Blade if you want high performance in a (relatively) light package.

 

-Intel Core i7 2600/k - [9/10]

Spoiler

Quite possibly Intel's best product launch ever. It had all the bleeding edge features of the time, it came with a very significant performance improvement over its predecessor and it had a soldered heatspreader, allowing for efficient cooling and great overclocking. Even the "locked" version could be overclocked through the multiplier within (quite reasonable) limits.

 

-Apple iPad Pro - [5/10]

Spoiler

A pretty good product, sunk by its price (plus the extra cost of the physical keyboard and the pencil). Buy it if you don't mind the Apple tax and are looking for a very light office machine with an excellent digitizer. Particularly good for rich students. Bad for cheap tinkerers like myself.

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

unless you really care about overclocking, and if you were you wouldnt be getting a B450 board, there will be pretty much no diffrence between the two beyond their respecive features. both VRMs are decent and can deliver plenty of power

I spent $2500 on building my PC and all i do with it is play no games atm & watch anime at 1080p(finally) watch YT and write essays...

Builds:

The Toaster Project! Northern Bee!

 

The original LAN PC build log! (Old, dead and replaced by The Toaster Project & 5.0)

Spoiler

"Here is some advice that might have gotten lost somewhere along the way in your life. 

 

#1. Treat others as you would like to be treated.

#2. It's best to keep your mouth shut; and appear to be stupid, rather than open it and remove all doubt.

#3. There is nothing "wrong" with being wrong. Learning from a mistake can be more valuable than not making one in the first place.

 

Follow these simple rules in life, and I promise you, things magically get easier. " - MageTank 31-10-2016

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

Agree, at stock speeds you could use almost any board, but if you think you might oc in the future, I personally would opt for the better VRMs. Are you limited to itx boards? or can you fit m-atx? if you could fit m-atx you could go with the msi b450 tomohawk which has IMO much better spec from reviews.

Please quote my post, or put @paddy-stone if you want me to respond to you.

Spoiler
  • PCs:- 
  • Main PC build  https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/list/2K6Q7X
  • ASUS x53e  - i7 2670QM / Sony BD writer x8 / Win 10, Elemetary OS, Ubuntu/ Samsung 830 SSD
  • Lenovo G50 - 8Gb RAM - Samsung 860 Evo 250GB SSD - DVD writer
  •  
  • Displays:-
  • Philips 55 OLED 754 model
  • Panasonic 55" 4k TV
  • LG 29" Ultrawide
  • Philips 24" 1080p monitor as backup
  •  
  • Storage/NAS/Servers:-
  • ESXI/test build  https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/list/4wyR9G
  • Main Server https://uk.pcpartpicker.com/list/3Qftyk
  • Backup server - HP Proliant Gen 8 4 bay NAS running FreeNAS ZFS striped 3x3TiB WD reds
  • HP ProLiant G6 Server SE316M1 Twin Hex Core Intel Xeon E5645 2.40GHz 48GB RAM
  •  
  • Gaming/Tablets etc:-
  • Xbox One S 500GB + 2TB HDD
  • PS4
  • Nvidia Shield TV
  • Xiaomi/Pocafone F2 pro 8GB/256GB
  • Xiaomi Redmi Note 4

 

  • Unused Hardware currently :-
  • 4670K MSI mobo 16GB ram
  • i7 6700K  b250 mobo
  • Zotac GTX 1060 6GB Amp! edition
  • Zotac GTX 1050 mini

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

20 minutes ago, paddy-stone said:

Agree, at stock speeds you could use almost any board, but if you think you might oc in the future, I personally would opt for the better VRMs. Are you limited to itx boards? or can you fit m-atx? if you could fit m-atx you could go with the msi b450 tomohawk which has IMO much better spec from reviews.

Well I have an ITX system, so yes, only ITX boards apply. There is not much choice honestly, the Asrock and Asus are really the only good options. MSI and Gigabyte ITX boards only have 4+2 VRM. I know theoretically the true 6-phase board is better, but for the price difference... I wonder if you'd really notice the difference in real world OC'ing, hence my question.

39 minutes ago, Bananasplit_00 said:

unless you really care about overclocking, and if you were you wouldnt be getting a B450 board, there will be pretty much no diffrence between the two beyond their respecive features. both VRMs are decent and can deliver plenty of power

Limited to ITX, and the X470 boards on ITX are basically identical to the B450.. so yea.

1 hour ago, Sauron said:

Both motherboards will have no problems whatsoever handling a 2600X at stock speeds. The ASUS board might get you a slightly higher stable overclock, but you'd need a really lucky chip to actually get there.

That is good to know thanks. I just got worried because I know the 2600X does boost to 4 GHZ on all cores and 4.2 GHZ on 1 core, so it is essentially drawing the power of a 2600 OC'd to 4Ghz. I want to make sure I have enough power to sustain the (base) clocks of the 2600X. And any future-proofing for 3000 series CPU's that might be more power hungry.

1 hour ago, lmeneses said:

no, the price difference is more of the asus fee rather than the vrms

Good to know. Thanks!

1 hour ago, jj9987 said:

Why? I have never heard of such issues.

I just got worried because I know the 2600X does boost to 4 GHZ on all cores and 4.2 GHZ on 1 core, so it is essentially drawing the power of a 2600 OC'd to 4Ghz. I want to make sure I have enough power to sustain the clocks of the 2600X. And any future-proofing for 3000 series CPU's that might be more power hungry.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share


×