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Backup help

Oliver12345
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So I want to backup my computer (which is around 800GB) to and external linux server within my house. But I don't know which software to use. I have already set-up a samba share on that server and connected to it from my computer. I think my upload speed is around 14 Mbps. I am currently using Cobian Backup, but am open to any other software (which is relatively fast).

 

If you need any more information, I would be glad to supply it. But anyway I need help. Thanks!

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Resilio Sync maybe. its not real backup software, but for direct syncing of folder content. Paid version has more options.

 

Another which probably will work is FreeFileSync. I don't use it to extend to know if it has automation, but you can create rules for which folders to sync.

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1 hour ago, LoGiCalDrm said:

Resilio Sync maybe. its not real backup software, but for direct syncing of folder content. Paid version has more options.

 

Another which probably will work is FreeFileSync. I don't use it to extend to know if it has automation, but you can create rules for which folders to sync.

Do you of any backup solution then? Maybe one that you use?

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52 minutes ago, Oliver12345 said:

Do you of any backup solution then? Maybe one that you use?

... Those are the ones I use. Or FreeFileSync is what I use. I have presets for folders I want to back up and then run it when I connect external HDD. I use Resilio to sync videos, books and other stuff like that to laptop and tablet. Faster than USB when I can use full 10gig wireless connection.

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FreeFileSync can be set up to automatically backup on a schedule but I do not recommend automatic backups. To be able to automatically backup, the destination has to be running and connected to the computer at all times. This exposes your backup to the same dangers your data can encounter on your computer, such as viruses and other malware, user error, power line surges or PSU failures that can fry your drives, theft, fire, etc.

 

For data to be reasonably safe, it has to exist in three different places. Usually, this means the computer, an onsite backup drive, and an offsite backup drive. For a backup drive to a true backup, it must be kept powered down, disconnected from the computer, and stored away from the computer except while updating the backup. Onsite and offsite backups should be swapped out as frequently as possible to make sure the offsite backup is as up to date as possible.

 

A NAS that stays connected to the computer is essentially the same as the computer. To use a NAS for backups, it has to be kept disconnected from the computer and powered down except while backing up the computer. If kept connected to the computer at all times, then the NAS needs to have an onsite and offsite backup.

 

To avoid backing up any viruses, etc., you should run complete antivirus and other antimalware scans immediately prior to updating a backup.

 

I recommend usinbg two different kinds of programs for backups. To do that, the System files (OS and programs) should be on their own drive (or partition if there is only one drive in a computer) and the data on another drive(s) (or partition).

 

Imaging is the best method for backing up the System. Cloning can be used but it is too cumbersome and inefficient and takes up too much room. An image can be used to restore your System to state it was in at the time the image was made.

 

I recommend Macrium Reflect Free for imaging. After downloading and installing it, be sure to make at least one recovery media (two or three is safer) before even making an image. You can store multiple images so one can choose how far back you need to go if you ever need to restore to an earlier date.

 

I recommend imaging only before making any changes to the System, such as installing updates, installing or removing programs, or changing any settings or configurations. There is no need to make scheduled images.

 

For backing up data, I recommend using a folder/file syncing program, such as FreeFileSync. Folder/file syncing programs set to Mirror Mode (not the same as RAID 1) work by comparing the source folder or drive (drives are treated like folders) with the destination drive (the backup). Any new or changed files on the source drive that are not on the destination drive are copied over to the destination drive. Any files on the destination drive that are not on the source drive are deleted from the destination drive. The result is what is essentially a clone of the source drive on the destination drive.

 

Since only new, changed, and deleted files are involved (after the initial backup), updating a backup can be very fast. I also recommend not backing up data on a schedule. Since backups can take so little little time, I suggest updating your onsite backup after you add or change critical data you can't afford to lose. The frequency you swap out your onsite and offsite backups also depend on how offten you ad or change data.

 

Many folder/file syncing programs, including FreeFileSync have a feature called Versioning. When enabled (which I strongly recommend), Versioning will send files deleted from the destination drive (or partition) to a user designated versioning folder on a backup drive or an entire backup drive. This protects you from losing accidentally deleted and corrupted files.

 

The above procedures seem pretty complex but, once set up, they're actually quick and easy to use.

Jeannie

 

As long as anyone is oppressed, no one will be safe and free.

One has to be proactive, not reactive, to ensure the safety of one's data so backup your data! And RAID is NOT a backup!

 

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So I just did the calculation and I have 800GB to transfer over a network of 11.4 MBPS. This will take 20 hours and 40 minutes (rounded to the nearest minute), meaning that if I start it on the Saturday at 10 am, it will finish on the Sunday at 6 am. Is there any way to speed this up.

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1 hour ago, Oliver12345 said:

So I just did the calculation and I have 800GB to transfer over a network of 11.4 MBPS. This will take 20 hours and 40 minutes (rounded to the nearest minute), meaning that if I start it on the Saturday at 10 am, it will finish on the Sunday at 6 am. Is there any way to speed this up.

Ofc not. You are limited by slowest speed of the system. Whether its your internet, drive read or drive write. Or physical connector if you were to use one. Good thing is that if you use proper backup setup, you need to do initial transfer only once. After that you can just update files that have been changed since last check. This also means that full image backup of storage system isn't something you want. You want to have something that you can load from in emergency situation with files available separetly.

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