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what is D.O.C.P for?

Go to solution Solved by GoodBytes,
11 minutes ago, sample text said:

thanks for the answer.I wanted to be calmed down a bit..I was like "omfg I applied too much thermal laste?I spent 1600EU for PC and I have problems on the 1st day???omg my CPU temp is too high?I expected 30 graduses"

Meh, you worry too much. If that was the case, just quickly remove the heatsink, remove the thermal paste you have, and put some back. Put the heatsink back on, and call it a day. Not even 10min of work assuming you are doing it the first time :)

i gotta 16gb 3200mhz ram and my x470 mobo.The D.O.C.P is disabled and my RAM atm is 2133Mhz.When I click on the D.O.C.P.,i can select "Profile#1"(I didnt do anything,idk from where I got that profile).What will happen if I use that profile?Is it dangerous?I want to use my 3200Mhz..when I select the Profile,it sets the Mhz to 3200

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It should be similar to XMP right? Just set it and see what happens.

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2 minutes ago, Some Random Member said:

It should be similar to XMP right? Just set it and see what happens.

gonna do that,I will tell you the results in 1 min

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Just now, sample text said:

gonna do that,I will tell you the results in 1 min

Run some memory benchmark then too.

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DOCP or Direct Over Clock Profile, is ASUS technology that aims to replicate Intel's eXtreme Memory Profile (XMP) feature found on all motherboards running Intel CPUs (assuming the motherboard is not way to old, or is an Manufacture system which they tend to lock the user from changing this option, among other options) .

 

What it does is get the RAM specs that it gets from requesting it (profile is stored on the memory chip), and then tries to change your motherboard settings memory settings to match the specifications of the RAM so that you can get what you paid for, else it goes with the minimum, safe speed, and it is up to you to configure your memory frequencies and clocks to get the speed mentioned on the RAM stick.

 

In other words,

If you by 3000MHz RAM with a timing of 4-4-4 CL4, normally when you put it, you'll get the same performance and timing as the cheap low-end RAM variety. You'll need to figure out how to configure the RAM to get such speed and timings. XMP is a standard which the memory manufacture puts the RAM target specs in a chip in the RAM itself, and the motherboard can read it, and apply these settings for you. DOCP uses XMP protocol to access it. Picking Profile 1 (usually there is only 1 profile, but technically you can have RAM with multiple profiles), and set the BIOS/UEFI configuration for you so that your system is configured properly to get this 3000MHz with 4-4-4 CL4 timings.. at least tries to.

 

 

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3 minutes ago, GoodBytes said:

DOCP or Direct Over Clock Profile, is ASUS technology that aims to replicate Intel's eXtreme Memory Profile feature found on all motherboards running Intel CPUs (assuming the motherboard is not way to old, or is an Manufacture system which they tend to lock the user from changing this option, among other options) .

 

What it does is get the RAM specs that it gets from requesting it (profile is stored on the memory chip), and then tries to change your motherboard settings memory settings to match the specifications of the RAM so that you can get what you paid for, else it goes with the minimum, safe speed, and it is up to you to configure your memory frequencies and clocks to get the speed mentioned on the RAM stick.

 

 

I enabled it and my RAM went from 2166Mhz to 3200Mhz ,but the CPU temp went from 51-52 to 54-55.is this temp bad?I have no iea tbh.I feel 55 graduses for brand new pc is too much

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21 minutes ago, sample text said:

I enabled it and my RAM went from 2166Mhz to 3200Mhz ,but the CPU temp went from 51-52 to 54-55.is this temp bad?I have no iea tbh.I feel 55 graduses for brand new pc is too much

See my edited post.

Like I explain, your motherboard will try its best to get those memory specs. It may need to overclock your CPU or other components to acheive these specs. This means that your system may get a bit warmer.

 

If your CPU is under 95C under heavy load, and can drop down once you stop at a decent rate, then your system has no cooling problem and operates correctly. Of course, when I say "95C" I mean, it is always best to keep the CPU (like any other processor, and component) as coolest as possible to ensure not only a cool and quiet computer (which is always enjoyable), but also boost life span of the hardware, and reduce the chances of problems.

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8 minutes ago, GoodBytes said:

See my edited post.

Like I explain, your motherboard will try its best to get those memory specs. It may need to overclock your CPU or other components to acheive these specs. This means that your system may get a bit warmer.

 

If your CPU is under 95C under heavy load, and can drop down once you stop at a decent rate, then your system has no cooling problem and operates correctly.

I got it,just I bought the processor with stock coller(wraith prism) which had already applied thermal compound.And I added a bit to my CPU(small amount of paste,like pea size) and ppl told me it's a mistake to add paste if you already have a cooler with applied paste and I wonder if this is a problem and if my CPU is 56 graduses,because of that

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1 minute ago, sample text said:

I got it,just I bought the processor with stock coller(wraith prism) which had already applied thermal compound.And I added a bit to my CPU(small amount of paste,like pea size) and ppl told me it's a mistake to add paste if you already have a cooler with applied paste and I wonder if this is a problem and if my CPU is 56 graduses,because of that

Ah ok. Well I am not familiar with your CPU temperatures. I would look at reviews that shows temp with the same cooler you have, and see how it compares at idle and load.

 

The role of thermal paste is to fill the microscopic bumps of the metal of both heatsink and CPU, to increase the surface area for heat transfer and help assists heat transfer between the two. That said, thermal paste is not copper, it doesn't transfer heat THAT well. So, if you put too much, it can do the contrary affect. In addition, it can make a mess by having thermal paste fall out the CPU sides.

 

As a test, for personal experimentation, using an Intel stock cooler and old CPU (don't recall the model, but not important.. I think it was a P4). I put a very thin layer of thermals paste on the whole CPU and heatsink (spreading it with a card), and tried the pea method, and both resulted equivalent results (pea method was less dirty and simpler). I also tried to put too much, and the end result is that the CPU was overheating and the system shutdown (over heating protection kicked in to protect the hardware. More modern CPUs will try to throttle instead before shutting down on you if the temps still can't be controlled by the throttling).

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4 minutes ago, GoodBytes said:

Ah ok. Well I am not familiar with your CPU temperatures. I would look at reviews that shows temp with the same cooler you have, and see how it compares at idle and load.

 

The role of thermal paste is to fill the microscopic bumps of the metal of both heatsink and CPU, to increase the surface area for heat transfer and help assists heat transfer between the two. That said, thermal paste is not copper, it doesn't transfer heat THAT well. So, if you put too much, it can do the contrary affect. In addition, it can make a mess by having thermal paste fall out the CPU sides.

 

As a test, for personal experimentation, using an Intel stock cooler and old CPU (don't recall the model, but not important.. I think it was a P4). I put a very thin layer of thermals paste on the whole CPU and heatsink (spreading it with a card), and tried the pea method, and both resulted equivalent results (pea method was less dirty and simpler). I also tried to put too much, and the end result is that the CPU was overheating and the system shutdown (over heating protection kicked in to protect the hardware. More modern CPUs will try to throttle instead before shutting down on you if the temps still can't be controlled by the throttling).

gonna check some reviews.never had a good CPU and I don't know what's the normal temperature for a 8 core 16 thread processor..I was used to my dual core 40 graduses cpu

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2 minutes ago, sample text said:

gonna check some reviews.never had a good CPU and I don't know what's the normal temperature for a 8 core 16 thread processor..I was used to my dual core 40 graduses cpu

Under 60 at load is very good for a 8 core cpu using stock cooler. My 1700 is around 70.

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3 minutes ago, Some Random Member said:

Under 60 at load is very good for a 8 core cpu using stock cooler. My 1700 is around 70.

thanks for the answer.I wanted to be calmed down a bit..I was like "omfg I applied too much thermal laste?I spent 1600EU for PC and I have problems on the 1st day???omg my CPU temp is too high?I expected 30 graduses"

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11 minutes ago, sample text said:

thanks for the answer.I wanted to be calmed down a bit..I was like "omfg I applied too much thermal laste?I spent 1600EU for PC and I have problems on the 1st day???omg my CPU temp is too high?I expected 30 graduses"

Meh, you worry too much. If that was the case, just quickly remove the heatsink, remove the thermal paste you have, and put some back. Put the heatsink back on, and call it a day. Not even 10min of work assuming you are doing it the first time :)

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  • 1 year later...
On 5/11/2018 at 11:05 AM, sample text said:

I got it,just I bought the processor with stock coller(wraith prism) which had already applied thermal compound.And I added a bit to my CPU(small amount of paste,like pea size) and ppl told me it's a mistake to add paste if you already have a cooler with applied paste and I wonder if this is a problem and if my CPU is 56 graduses,because of that

You want as little as possible separating the heat sink from the coo. All that pate is supposed to do is fill in the gaps of uneven surfaces. Anything more will actually *decrease* the efficiency of the heatsink. I strongly suspect that in your case as you seed more on top of what was there. "Pea-sized" means the total amount should be that our smaller. Trust the mfg to know what is needed with their OEM heatsink

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