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$650 QUAD SOCKET Gaming Workstation!

Retired server hardware is always in ample supply, so why not reduce e-waste and build a MONSTER budget workstation?

 

 

Buy a Threadripper CPU instead to save yourself the headache:
On Amazon: http://geni.us/LDLo6
On Newegg: http://geni.us/zoBpE

Anthony @ LINUS MEDIA GROUP             

I'm a handsome man with a charming personality. - Gabe Newell

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Can i play minesweeper on this dad?

Specs:

 Gaming PC: i5 3570, 16GB 1600MHz, GTX 780 3GB, Transcend 128GB, WD 500GB, Seagate 500GB, Thermaltake 600W Smart, S340 w/ RGB, Windows 10 Pro

 Server: Xeon E5 2650, 12GB 1600MHz ECC, 8400GS, WD 2TB + 1TB + 1TB, EVGA 500B 500W, Windows 10 Pro

 Laptop: Macbook Pro Retina 2013, i7 4558U, 8GB 1600MHz, Intel Iris Pro 1.5GB, Apple 256GB NVME, Mojave

 

 Internet: $70/month For 500/100, Actually get 525/102

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wow that thumbnail actually looks pretty nice

Snorlax: i7 5820k @4.5ghz, Asus X99 Pro, 32gb Corsair Vengeance LPX 2666, Cryorig R1 Ultimate, Samsung 850 evo 500gb, Asus GTX 1080 ROG Strix, Corsair RM850x, NZXT H440, Hue+

Smallsnor: Huawei Matebook X

 

Canon AE-1 w/ 50mm f/1.8 lens

Pentax KM w/ 55mm f/1.8 SMC lens

Zenit-E w/ 58mm f/2 Helios lens

Panasonic G7 with 14-42mm f/3.5 lens

Polaroid Spectra System

 

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38 minutes ago, GabenJr said:

Buy a Threadripper CPU instead to save yourself the headache:

I did exactly that.

 

Edit: Interesting, I purchased 4 Opteron 6174s to use as a render farm.  This video might prove very useful.

DSC_0266.thumb.JPG.ab08f423320fafb614c8986d02b0f7ff.JPG

 

@LinusTech I'll purchase that motherboard for $20.00  :P

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23 minutes ago, GabenJr said:

Buy a Threadripper CPU instead to save yourself the headache

Not the same price though. The CPU(s) + motherboard cost about $300. A threadripper CPU and an x399 board cost at least $800, and that's assuming you buy the 1900x, which is terrible for the money.

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I like stuff like this, and I´d find it awesome if you were to make more videos involving server hardware and workstations.

 

How about scrapyard wars where the task is to build servers that give best reliability, performance and tco for particular tasks, like databases, web servers, file servers and whatever else comes to mind?  You could also do an episode about using exclusively server hardware to build a gaming machine.

 

I can imagine that quite a few ppl are looking at server stuff and ask themselves if it´s worthwhile, so you could make some videos about various servers and how to turn them into machines you can  have at your desk or about actually using them as servers.  Some will be too loud but could be modified to be quiet, some might need too much power, some might not be very useful at all, some might be converted to water cooling ... If we had more information about all this, we could have more awesome machines without spending fortunes.  There are lots of possibilities and lots of knowledge that you could bring across, and as far as I´ve seen, you guys haven´t made many videos in that area.

 

Gaming really isn´t everything, and benchmarks aren´t, either.  When I see ppl checking temperatures after only 10 or 30 minutes and running benchmarks for a couple minutes, I´m finding that mostly funny.  What counts much more than that is if the machine will run and perform reliably under adverse conditions 24/7, 365 days a year.  My requirement when I build something is sustaining full load at ambient temperatures of up to 40C, and a difference of 5C is merely tolerance, so you´re looking at 45C ambient if in doubt.  Adverse conditions are real world conditions like variations in temperature and current, rough handling, and whatever disturbing influence might enter the machine through network cables.  There´s also things like how difficult/easy it is to get at parts when something needs to be checked or when a drive needs to be replaced.

 

How do your gaming machines really perform?

 

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9 minutes ago, Lord of Blackwood said:

@linus I am ready to take that board off your hands. ?

Competition I see...

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You didn't do anything with NUMA! That AMD platform is a NUMA (Non Uniform Memory Access) platform. In this case it means that every CPU has its own memory slots and when a CPU needs something stored on another CPUs memory it incurs a significant performance overhead. The games you played aren't made with any of that in mind. You should try the benchmarks again with just 1 of the sockets installed, I think that will improve their performance.

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2 minutes ago, Captain Polymer said:

You didn't do anything with NUMA! That AMD platform is a NUMA (Non Uniform Memory Access) platform. In this case it means that every CPU has its own memory slots and when a CPU needs something stored on another CPUs memory it incurs a significant performance overhead. The games you played aren't made with any of that in mind. You should try the benchmarks again with just 1 of the sockets installed, I think that will improve their performance.

You might find this interesting.

https://www.anandtech.com/show/11726/retesting-amd-ryzen-threadrippers-game-mode-halving-cores-for-more-performance

Quote

Game Mode does two things over Creator Mode. First, it changes the memory from UMA to NUMA, so the system can determine between near and far memory. At DDR4-2400, that 108ns ‘average’ latency becomes 79ns for near memory and 136ns for far memory (as per our testing). The system will ensure to use up all available near memory first, before moving to the higher latency far memory.

 

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Is this setup idle for an application like ARCHICAD where it can use as many cores as you have and performance would be amazing, if so, I would build something like this and you can just sell the board to me.

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Howdy All,


I gotta ask. What IS the bottle neck? I was actually considering doing something similar with Xeon CPUs as a Server workstation for VM Labs and for PCI-Passthrough gaming.

Any ideas what the bottle neck is?

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16 minutes ago, Captain Polymer said:

You didn't do anything with NUMA! That AMD platform is a NUMA (Non Uniform Memory Access) platform. In this case it means that every CPU has its own memory slots and when a CPU needs something stored on another CPUs memory it incurs a significant performance overhead. The games you played aren't made with any of that in mind. You should try the benchmarks again with just 1 of the sockets installed, I think that will improve their performance.

Didn´t they consider that?  They sure need to do benchmarks with correct NUMA settings.  Pulling out or otherwise disabling CPUs is not the way to get good NUMA settings.

 

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2 minutes ago, J3n0v4 said:

Howdy All,


I gotta ask. What IS the bottle neck? I was actually considering doing something similar with Xeon CPUs as a Server workstation for VM Labs and for PCI-Passthrough gaming.

Any ideas what the bottle neck is?

I was wondering about that, too --- and am in general wondering how they find out if something is CPU bound or GPU bound.

 

Perhaps results with Xeons would be much better --- and, of course, good NUMA settings.

 

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Hi

 

Why did yous not investigate what the bottleneck was??

 

At the moment my main computer has 2 Xeon E5450s (each quad-core - 3Ghz) with an RX 480 8GB ...I play Shadow of War, GTA5 etc with no issues, really smooth 1080p on ultra settings.

 

What I'm going to get next is a Dell T5500 and put two Xeon X5670 (each hexa-core - 2.9Ghz) in it which will give me better performance and DDR3 (instead of DDR2).

 

Anyway would have been interesting to know why it was awful at gaming, maybe for your next "old server build" you should use a T5500!

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@SlickI heard you guys had a motherboard for sale from your most recent video. I am in need of one. How much you looking for?

http://pcpartpicker.com/list/Mf3Zcc My build

 

R.I.P Donny- Got banned. We will always remember your spamming of "Cancerbooks"

 

iPhones are like 1 ply toliet paper with a logo slapped on them and years old hardware in them- A Wise Man

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I'd be pretty interested to see what the power draw out the wall was.  While this build was cheaper I'd wonder how much more expensive it is to RUN compared to a much more modern and efficent system.  Machines built for rendering and creative tasks can see a lot of their service life running under load after all.

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23 hours ago, Lord of Blackwood said:

How about using it for a virtualisation box? 

64 cores times 8 means 512 virtual cpu's more than enough for any lab. 

After seeing this, I'm actually considering going this direction after seeing the pricing they found on eBay, though probably more around a dual-socket than a quad, as I have an older dual Xeon workstation (HP Z600) that I currently use for virtualization that I'd like to swap out for something better.

Wife's build: Amethyst - Ryzen 9 3900X, 32GB G.Skill Ripjaws V DDR4-3200, ASUS Prime X570-P, EVGA GTX 1080 SC, Corsair Obsidian 750D, Corsair RM1000

My build: Mira - Ryzen 7 3700X, 32GB EVGA DDR4-3200, ASUS Prime X470-PRO, EVGA GTX 1070 SC Black Edition, NZXT H440, EVGA Supernova 1050 GS

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14 hours ago, brandishwar said:

After seeing this, I'm actually considering going this direction after seeing the pricing they found on eBay, though probably more around a dual-socket than a quad, as I have an older dual Xeon workstation (HP Z600) that I currently use for virtualization that I'd like to swap out for something better.

T5500 with two Xeon X5670! (The 2nd CPU socket is on a riser board, a lot of them on eBay are only one socket ..be sure to buy one with two sockets)

https://forums.anandtech.com/threads/what-were-the-best-lga-1366-workstations.2434197/

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