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Voltage drops 0.7v on vcore during stress test

enfinders
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Go to solution Solved by johndms,
28 minutes ago, enfinders said:

Ok so what's the difference between cpu vcore, cpu vid, and cpu vdd in hardware monitor?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_XGhpKHWYAg - I often refer people to this video when this question is asked. I'm not entirely sure what cpu vdd is on your board.

28 minutes ago, enfinders said:

With llc set to extreme profile  i'm touching 1.38, which is +0.02 from the original setting, at 1.35

I would advise never to use extreme LLC. I don't care what other people may say or how good a board may be, the highest and extreme LLC settings will damage a CPU. According to your image, I would avoid Turbo and Extreme. The higher you go, the closer to 1.35 your voltage will stay during load. So stick with Low or Medium. As you can see, Turbo and Extreme overshoot your 1.35 vcore and it may briefly spike much higher than that (you won't see that on any monitor) when returning to idle. I'll post another video that deals with the dangers of Extreme LLC. In an ideal situation, you should be as close to 1.35 during load without going over.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z8nFdFpuVBg

 

So this new ryzen build is giving me a hell of a lot of problems.

So recently i was playing with it, and i noticed that my vcore voltage drops quiet a lot during stress test...

Starring at an empty desktop, 1% cpu usage, no programs opened : vcore at 1.4 volts, 3.9 ghz

stress testing in aida64: vcore drops to 1.332/1.335v, freq at 3.9 ghz stable, load line calibration on auto ( i noticed that is the most effective setting in reducing vcore voltage drop).

 

Should i start worrying about my mobo, or is it something normal? 

to be said, vrm temps stay below 65 c, and cpu never exceeded 69 c

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5 minutes ago, AJ-Goodrich said:

https://www.anandtech.com/show/2404/5

 

Take a good gander at that article. It explains your exact issue. 

 

 

Thank you very much, that explains a lot. Still, i have a friend with a 7700k, and he experienced way less voltage drop. Could be a more powerful vrm? Also, do you think i should leave the load line calibration on auto or manually set it? 

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20 minutes ago, enfinders said:

vcore drops to 1.332/1.335v, freq at 3.9 ghz stable, load line calibration on auto ( i noticed that is the most effective setting in reducing vcore voltage drop).

Your vcore drops to 1.332 from 1.4v? You claim 'Auto' is the most effective setting, what does it drop to when you actually use LLC? That's one of the primary ways to eliminate vdroop; increase LLC settings. What LLC choices does it give you to choose between?

CPU: Ryzen 5 5600x  Board: Asus PRIME X570-P  Ram: G.Skill Ripjaws V Series 16GB (2x8) DDR4-3000  Case: Fractal Design Define S

GPU: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070  SSD: HP EX950 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME  HDD: Seagate Barracuda 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM

PSU: SeaSonic FOCUS Plus Platinum 750W  Cooler: Noctua NH-U12S SE-AM4  Monitor: Viotek GFT27DB 27.0" 2560x1440 144 Hz

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Totally normal. If you want to alleviate the issue just change the LLC

16 minutes ago, enfinders said:

Thank you very much, that explains a lot. Still, i have a friend with a 7700k, and he experienced way less voltage drop. Could be a more powerful vrm? Also, do you think i should leave the load line calibration on auto or manually set it? 

It's gonna depend on CPU, mobo, LLC settings, etc.

 

If you don't want such high vdroop, you should manually set LLC.

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2 hours ago, johndms said:

Your vcore drops to 1.332 from 1.4v? You claim 'Auto' is the most effective setting, what does it drop to when you actually use LLC? That's one of the primary ways to eliminate vdroop; increase LLC settings. What LLC choices does it give you to choose between?

Ok so what's the difference between cpu vcore, cpu vid, and cpu vdd in hardware monitor? With llc set to extreme profile  i'm touching 1.38, which is +0.02 from the original setting, at 1.35. I think i made a mistake, i did my test always referring to cpu vdd, on hw, and not the actual cpu vcore. But made me think: which is the voltage the CPU is actually using? And, shouldn't the voltage generated from the mosfets be the same as the one the cpu is running at?

Below a screenshot of all the tests i did in an excel sheet: i guess everything is normal?

 

stress.PNG

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28 minutes ago, enfinders said:

Ok so what's the difference between cpu vcore, cpu vid, and cpu vdd in hardware monitor?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_XGhpKHWYAg - I often refer people to this video when this question is asked. I'm not entirely sure what cpu vdd is on your board.

28 minutes ago, enfinders said:

With llc set to extreme profile  i'm touching 1.38, which is +0.02 from the original setting, at 1.35

I would advise never to use extreme LLC. I don't care what other people may say or how good a board may be, the highest and extreme LLC settings will damage a CPU. According to your image, I would avoid Turbo and Extreme. The higher you go, the closer to 1.35 your voltage will stay during load. So stick with Low or Medium. As you can see, Turbo and Extreme overshoot your 1.35 vcore and it may briefly spike much higher than that (you won't see that on any monitor) when returning to idle. I'll post another video that deals with the dangers of Extreme LLC. In an ideal situation, you should be as close to 1.35 during load without going over.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z8nFdFpuVBg

 

CPU: Ryzen 5 5600x  Board: Asus PRIME X570-P  Ram: G.Skill Ripjaws V Series 16GB (2x8) DDR4-3000  Case: Fractal Design Define S

GPU: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070  SSD: HP EX950 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME  HDD: Seagate Barracuda 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM

PSU: SeaSonic FOCUS Plus Platinum 750W  Cooler: Noctua NH-U12S SE-AM4  Monitor: Viotek GFT27DB 27.0" 2560x1440 144 Hz

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I'll give an example using my Ryzen 5 1600. I overclock to 3.8GHz at 1.35v. When I stress test, HWMonitor will show my vcore dropping to as low as 1.256v (-0.094) which is terrible vdroop, but it means my 3.8GHz overclock is technically stable at 1.256v. BUT, my board does not have LLC capability because it's a budget board. If I had LLC capabilities, it's entirely possible that I could lower my vcore from 1.35 to 1.275 and be perfectly fine with a medium-range LLC setting. As long as my voltage doesn't drop below 1.256, in theory, I should be stable.

CPU: Ryzen 5 5600x  Board: Asus PRIME X570-P  Ram: G.Skill Ripjaws V Series 16GB (2x8) DDR4-3000  Case: Fractal Design Define S

GPU: NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070  SSD: HP EX950 1 TB M.2-2280 NVME  HDD: Seagate Barracuda 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM

PSU: SeaSonic FOCUS Plus Platinum 750W  Cooler: Noctua NH-U12S SE-AM4  Monitor: Viotek GFT27DB 27.0" 2560x1440 144 Hz

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23 hours ago, johndms said:

I'll give an example using my Ryzen 5 1600. I overclock to 3.8GHz at 1.35v. When I stress test, HWMonitor will show my vcore dropping to as low as 1.256v (-0.094) which is terrible vdroop, but it means my 3.8GHz overclock is technically stable at 1.256v. BUT, my board does not have LLC capability because it's a budget board. If I had LLC capabilities, it's entirely possible that I could lower my vcore from 1.35 to 1.275 and be perfectly fine with a medium-range LLC setting. As long as my voltage doesn't drop below 1.256, in theory, I should be stable.

Appreciate the explanation :) yeah, in theory. Honestly, i didn't know a lot of things explained in the video. really informative, thank you. I'll do as you said. LLC to medium, at 1.35 volts. Again, appreciate it, thanks.

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