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First new build help. Slight budget. Completely oblivious to calculations on psu wattage..

Budget (including currency): 1100 Euro's roughly

Country: Netherlands

Games, programs or workloads that it will be used for: Gaming, latest titles. Lots and lots of school(work) as i'm about to start my final year of law school. But i assume most pc's nowadays can handle an assload of word-documents so thats not really an issue

Other details i already own a monitor, speaker set, mouse, headset.

 

I play games at 1080p, preferably 120+ fps, but 60fps is basically as low as i'm willing to go. Would love to play games at higher settings, but not an absolute necessity.

 

Current build:

 

Cpu: Ryzen 5 2400G

Cpu cooler: Aerocool Hyper TX3 EVO

Gpu: Nvidia GTX 1650 4GB

RAM: 2x 8GB corsair vengeance DDR 4 2400

Storage: 500 GB 3.5 inch drive

              : 500 GB Crucial BX500 SSD

Motherboard:  Gigabyte B450 Aorus Elite.

Case: Aerocool Rift, (god awful for airflow)

Case fans: 2x be quiet silent wings 120 MM PWM.

 

Its 3 years old, regularly cleaned and in good state. will be gifting all parts to one of my best mates. Severely struggling financially and lacking in specs, so itll help him/us play games together for a bit longer. So no cannibalised parts in my new build.

 

I'm considering upgrading to:

 

Case: Antec NX420

CPU: Ryzen 5 5600G (IGPU in case my gpu kicks the bucket for whatever reason. I like being safe as i dont have any spare gpu's just lying around)

 

GPU: Gigabyte RTX 3060 Eagle OC 12GB

RAM: 2x 8GB Corsair Vengeance DDR 4 3200

CPU Cooler: Be Quiet! Pure Rock 2

Storage:

       - Samsung 980 NVME M.2 SSD (1TB)
       -Crucial BX 500 2.5 inch SSD (1TB)
       -Seagate Barracuda 7200RPM HDD (1TB)

 

SSD's will be for my games and windows install. HDD will just be some relatively cheap storage for important (Large) documents and files that i dont expect to be accessing or needing extremely often over the years.
              
Motherboard: Gigabyte Aorus B550 Elite V2 ATX

Case fans: 3x Be Quiet! Pure Wings 2 PWM 140 mm ( 2 intake, 1 exhaust )

 

Wattage according to pc partpicker: Around 384 watts.

 

Cost: 1071 Euro's ( roughly 1096 USD)

 

Link: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/FZ2vDq

 

Is this an okay starting point? What wattage should i consider for my psu? I have a 600 watt psu now, do i need to go for a higher wattage? Do i need to reconsider some choices i made?

 

Would love to hear some feedback, thanks guys!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Hi , before I even look at your parts, it may be helpful to list my specs, the suggested wattage for my PC, and then tell you what the average and highest wattage I've pulled from my attached UPS device has tended to read. At least for comparison. 

 

https://pcpartpicker.com/list/D2Dj4s

 

PcPartpicker suggested I get a PSU to handle an estimated power draw of 539watts.

I got an 850watts 80+ platinum PSU.

However, at idle I never push past 223watts, and my average gaming load brings it to 320watts. The absolute highest I've ever seen my UPS report in a high-load gaming session was about 420watts... but that's VERY RARE.

 

Take away: the Pcpartpicker estimated wattage isn't very exact. However, it's a good idea to aim above the estimate power draw of a system by getting a more capable and more power efficient PSU so that if a GPU, CPU were to draw an abnormally high wattage demand, the PSU can supply it and not freak out. You have older PC parts or parts that are less demanding, so you could get away with perhaps an 650-750watt PSU. I assume that would give you plenty of headroom to protect against a surprise high power draw event from your components, and they don't tend to be very expensive. 

 

BUT WAIT FOR MORE REPLIES. I don't know a whole lot about these things, and I'm on the USA power grid so I hand it over to someone else.

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Generally I consider estimated wattage should be 50-60% of ur PSU capacity. Means that it should run at peak performance and have headroom for spikes and upgrades.

 

OP don't forget to select Netherlands under country. Completely changes the prices. Having to redo my suggestion cause I didn't realise they were US stores.

 

Build is all over the place.

5600G is locked to PCIE gen 3.0 support. Missing out on performance just with wrong CPU.

170euro b550 motherboard is extremely expensive.

3060 cards are very bad value for money right now.

Weird storage configuration.

Case + 30 euro of upfront fan investment seems backwards in a budget build.

 

Something like this will be far better.

Storage should be better. 15Euro for 2TB HDD seems awfully low.

Similar GPU at a substantially lower price.

Case says it comes with all 4 fans included but hard to say, research yourself first. Sorry for RGB puke if ur not into that but hey, free fans...

PSU is ok midrange:

 

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: Intel Core i5-12400F 2.5 GHz 6-Core Processor  (€209.00 @ Azerty) 
CPU Cooler: Deepcool AK400 66.47 CFM CPU Cooler  (€38.85 @ Megekko) 
Motherboard: MSI PRO B660-A DDR4 ATX LGA1700 Motherboard  (€159.00 @ Amazon Netherlands) 
Memory: Corsair Vengeance LPX 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3200 CL16 Memory  (€59.90 @ Amazon Netherlands) 
Storage: PNY XLR8 CS3030 2 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive  (€148.85 @ Megekko) 
Storage: Seagate IronWolf Pro 2 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive  (€15.90 @ Megekko) 
Video Card: XFX Radeon RX 6600 8 GB Speedster SWFT 210 Video Card  (€301.99 @ Amazon Netherlands) 
Case: BitFenix Nova Mesh SE ATX Mid Tower Case  (€65.66 @ Amazon Netherlands) 
Power Supply: SeaSonic G12 GC 850 W 80+ Gold Certified ATX Power Supply  (€88.85 @ Amazon Netherlands) 
Total: €1088.00
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2022-08-10 12:10 CEST+0200

 

If you want integrated graphics for worries of redundancy just swap to non F variant.

Edited by venomtail
OP had his list set to US and I didn't realise. Now it's correct country

Desktop: Ryzen 7 2700X - Kraken X62 Rev 2 - STRIX X470-I - 3200MHz 16GB Dominator Platinum - 250GB 970 Evo boot - 2x 500GB 860 Evo - 4TB HDD - XFX 5600XT - RMx 750 W 80+ Gold - Manta

SetupZowie XL2740 27.0" 240hz - AOC E2460SH 24.0 Roccat Burt Pro Corsair K70 LUX browns - HyperX Cloud - Mackie CR5X's

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14 minutes ago, Lilscratchy said:

Is this an okay starting point? What wattage should i consider for my psu? I have a 600 watt psu now, do i need to go for a higher wattage? Do i need to reconsider some choices i made?

That should probably be enough headroom for the parts... but to be extra safe; generally speaking, the closer to the maximum potential power draw you come in PC specs to the maximum your PSU is rated for, the more key the power efficiency of the PSU comes in to play. You see, a 600watt gold PSU that is used to pun a computer that draws 500watts... well, the PSU may not be able to run efficiently at that close to the maximum. Whereas a 600watt platinum PSU running a computer drawing 500 watts would likely fair sigfnifigantly better on a day to day operation. That's why people tend to get much better PSU than they need. 

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22 minutes ago, Lilscratchy said:

 - Samsung 980 NVME M.2 SSD (1TB)
       -Crucial BX 500 2.5 inch SSD (1TB)
       -Seagate Barracuda 7200RPM HDD (1TB)

This is by all means a nit-pick. But Seagate regularly sustains about 15-20% higher RMA failure rate across all their product lines compared to other HDD companies, such as WD or Toshiba... I'm not anti-seagate. Infact I have the 7200rpm Seagate in my build, as you see in my parts list above. But note that there are far more industry-known higher-build quality HDD's for that price. There have been third party statistics and RMA reports comparing Seagate, WD, and Toshiba HDD's to each other over like 5 years now, and each time it appears that Seagate, no mater if it's enterprise, consumer, home office, internal or external HDD, their HDD always have significantly higher RMA failure rates than those they've been compared to. My suggestion, if going Seagate saves you $20 or less (what ever that is in Euros), just go with Seagate's competitors. 

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12 minutes ago, venomtail said:

My only recommended amendment to this suggested build, go with at least a platinum in that wattage. It'll save you money in the long run on electricity, but most importantly, it'll have protections a GOLD just won't have. Gold rated PSU's are the ones that get fake stickers put on them, they're the class of PSU that is most muddied in the industry. Platinum is gonna give you more wattage headroom, it's going to have more protections, it'll come with better build quality and far better warrenties. It'll come with more cable ports for future expandability and system upgrades. I would not recommend a gold or less for any recent computer build. Gold was a safe option about 3 years ago, but we've learned alot as consumers about PSU quality, tips, and industry tricks since then. Thanks GamersNexus! (Youtube)

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TO BE CLEAR, A PLATINUM PSU UPFRONT WILL COST WAY MORE THAN THAT $90 PSU RECOMENDATION. But, skimping out on low-quality PSU (yes even gold rated) can mean unstable power supply to computer parts that can mean premature part failure or death. Even though the recommended parts above aren't god-tier, they're modern. And modern computer parts demand highly stable power supply to run at their advertised specs, no matter the wattage they're specified to pull. So getting a platinum PSU at any Wattage listing is a safe bet to maintain a daily driver over the long run. 

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7 minutes ago, Spainz said:

My only recommended amendment to this suggested build, go with at least a platinum in that wattage. It'll save you money in the long run on electricity, but most importantly, it'll have protections a GOLD just won't have. Gold rated PSU's are the ones that get fake stickers put on them, they're the class of PSU that is most muddied in the industry. Platinum is gonna give you more wattage headroom, it's going to have more protections, it'll come with better build quality and far better warrenties. It'll come with more cable ports for future expandability and system upgrades. I would not recommend a gold or less for any recent computer build. Gold was a safe option about 3 years ago, but we've learned alot as consumers about PSU quality, tips, and industry tricks since then. Thanks GamersNexus! (Youtube)

Not really.

 

If you so much care about efficiency as saving money for electricity in the long run, make sure it runs at peak efficiency rather than what peak tier it's rated at. Sure a platinum PSU might last you longer but if you're running a 550W Platinum PSU at 80% capacity and an 850W Gold PSU at 55% capacity, over the years the Gold rated PSU will have actually saved you more. At worst for the Gold PSU, they'll both be running at same efficiency with the Platinum just having much lower headroom. Compare the Seasonics Gold vs Platinum ratings as an example. 

Of course for the whole picture you still need to calculate how much more a platinum/titanium rated PSU costs over a gold one against how long you will be using it with how much electricity costs where you live.

 

As for fake stickers that's why you buy from reputable brands, with reviews and have buyers protection.

 

For surge protection the logical thing to do is to use fuses to burn themselves up than letting something like a surge getting to a PSU and making a PSU handle it.

 

Don't fearmonger the poor OP. Nothing wrong with Gold rated PSU's.

Desktop: Ryzen 7 2700X - Kraken X62 Rev 2 - STRIX X470-I - 3200MHz 16GB Dominator Platinum - 250GB 970 Evo boot - 2x 500GB 860 Evo - 4TB HDD - XFX 5600XT - RMx 750 W 80+ Gold - Manta

SetupZowie XL2740 27.0" 240hz - AOC E2460SH 24.0 Roccat Burt Pro Corsair K70 LUX browns - HyperX Cloud - Mackie CR5X's

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If you already have a mobo, you might as well go ryzen here

https://nl.pcpartpicker.com/list/wcsdGL

The 5600g is a pretty bad cpu because it's worse than the 5600 and only has up to pcie gen 3 support

Stock cooler to allocate costs elsewhere, ryzens stock coolers are better so I'd bet that this cpu is fine for stock

Fast ram for ryzens infinity fabric 

2tb m.2 storage

Better case with airflow and a solid 850 watt psu

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39 minutes ago, Ryuikko said:

If you already have a mobo, you might as well go ryzen here

https://nl.pcpartpicker.com/list/wcsdGL

The 5600g is a pretty bad cpu because it's worse than the 5600 and only has up to pcie gen 3 support

Stock cooler to allocate costs elsewhere, ryzens stock coolers are better so I'd bet that this cpu is fine for stock

Fast ram for ryzens infinity fabric 

2tb m.2 storage

Better case with airflow and a solid 850 watt psu

3 hours ago, Lilscratchy said:

will be gifting all parts to one of my best mates.

3 hours ago, Lilscratchy said:

So no cannibalised parts in my new build.

I understood that he's giving his current PC away to a friend and building a new one from scratch. That means he doesn't have an existing motherboard to reuse and save costs.

Desktop: Ryzen 7 2700X - Kraken X62 Rev 2 - STRIX X470-I - 3200MHz 16GB Dominator Platinum - 250GB 970 Evo boot - 2x 500GB 860 Evo - 4TB HDD - XFX 5600XT - RMx 750 W 80+ Gold - Manta

SetupZowie XL2740 27.0" 240hz - AOC E2460SH 24.0 Roccat Burt Pro Corsair K70 LUX browns - HyperX Cloud - Mackie CR5X's

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18 minutes ago, venomtail said:

I understood that he's giving his current PC away to a friend and building a new one from scratch. That means he doesn't have an existing motherboard to reuse and save costs.

I think I misread lol

https://nl.pcpartpicker.com/list/yFj6Nc

Same suggestions with a mobo factored in

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3 hours ago, Spainz said:

My only recommended amendment to this suggested build, go with at least a platinum in that wattage. It'll save you money in the long run on electricity, but most importantly, it'll have protections a GOLD just won't have. Gold rated PSU's are the ones that get fake stickers put on them, they're the class of PSU that is most muddied in the industry. Platinum is gonna give you more wattage headroom, it's going to have more protections, it'll come with better build quality and far better warrenties. It'll come with more cable ports for future expandability and system upgrades. I would not recommend a gold or less for any recent computer build. Gold was a safe option about 3 years ago, but we've learned alot as consumers about PSU quality, tips, and industry tricks since then. Thanks GamersNexus! (Youtube)

 

It won't save you any money unless the Platinum unit costs the same price as the Gold. Any small savings would be offset by the cost of the Platinum unit.

 

Also not sure why you think a Platinum unit has more protection features than a Gold ? We are only talking about efficiency. It has nothing to do with quality. You can find 10 year warranties on a lot of Gold units, so that isn't true either.

 

Maybe you just watched the Gigabyte P-GM video and assumed all Gold rated units are like that ? That is the exception rather than the rule.

 

3 hours ago, Spainz said:

TO BE CLEAR, A PLATINUM PSU UPFRONT WILL COST WAY MORE THAN THAT $90 PSU RECOMENDATION. But, skimping out on low-quality PSU (yes even gold rated) can mean unstable power supply to computer parts that can mean premature part failure or death. Even though the recommended parts above aren't god-tier, they're modern. And modern computer parts demand highly stable power supply to run at their advertised specs, no matter the wattage they're specified to pull. So getting a platinum PSU at any Wattage listing is a safe bet to maintain a daily driver over the long run. 

Again not true as you are only referring to efficiency. There are lots of high quality Gold rated units. A Platinum psu isn't going to be more 'stable' as you put it.

Winter is Coming.

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