Jump to content
Search In
  • More options...
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Web Developer interview questions/prep

Bluuz
 Share

I've been selected for an interview for an entry level web developer position. The alert was incredibly short notice and this is my first ever job interview. I have zero experience with developing websites and databases, frankly, I'm surprised I got picked. 

 

Aside from rehearsing general questions,

 

What kind of questions should I prepare for?

What are things I can do to boost my odds? 

Those of you who work for "tech" companies, full jacket? or simple dress shirt (+tie)?

What are some good questions to ask the hiring manager?

Any other tips?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

Why would you apply for a web developer position if you have zero experience with web developing?

Just curious.

Current rig: CPU: AMD FX-8120  Cooling: Corsair H100i  Mobo: ASRock 970 Extreme 3  RAM: 8GB 1333Mhz  GPU: MSI GTX 660Ti Power Edition  Case: Fractal Design Define R4  Storage: 2TB Seagate HDD + 128GB Crucial SSD  PSU: be quiet! 730W bronze

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

Why would you apply for a web developer position if you have zero experience with web developing?

Just curious.

Gotta start somewhere. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

Congrats on the interview!

- I've had 2 interviews in my young working life and both focused on me as a person more than my knowledge on the areas, most likely because in both cases I was applying for entry-level jobs too. This means that if you get in there will be some training involved. Don't be surprised if there's a couple basic questions on web development like some of the html tags, or whether you know javascript and css besides html. Depending on how much they expect from you they might go in deeper or ask you to code a quick sample page.

- Anyone can pick up a book on web design, so try to work into the interview other positive parts of yourself. Any skills or interests you think might come in handy. I'm assuming you built your own PC, so mention you're into PCs in general, both hardware and software. Having basic maintenance skills is a big deal and I've met many programmers who've never taken off a side panel. Even something as basic as "dedicated and curious" can make you a more interesting candidate.

- The place I work at is pretty informal, we use jeans and t-shirts but I did wear dressing shoes and dress shirt for my interview. I was clearly out of place but I'd rather overdress (not over the top though) than under do it.

- Ask about team sizes, technologies used, how communication works, company atmosphere and that kind of thing. I'm personally not very comfortable asking about payments and vacation policies right away, but that's just me. I just feel it's pretty cocky, I'd rather wait for them to contact me again or let me know I've actually got a chance.

 

and here's one last tip:

study. Prepare for it as if you're sure you will get the job, having at least some level of understanding in the topics will not only make you more confident during the interview but help you if you start working there. Hope this helps. Good luck!

[spoiler=pc specs:]cpu: i5-4670k | mobo: z87-pro | cpu cooler: h100i | ram: 8gb vengeance pro | gpu: gtx770 ftw 4gb | case: nzxt switch 810 matte black | storage: 240gb ssd; 1tb hdd | psu: 750w corsair rm |
keyboards: max nighthawk x8 mx brown + blue led; corsair k60 mx red; ducky shine 3 tkl mx blue + orange led | mouse: deathadder black edition | audio: FiiO E10; sennheiser hd558; grado sr80i; sony mdr-nc200d; blue snowball |

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

Congrats on the interview!

- I've had 2 interviews in my young working life and both focused on me as a person more than my knowledge on the areas, most likely because in both cases I was applying for entry-level jobs too. This means that if you get in there will be some training involved. Don't be surprised if there's a couple basic questions on web development like some of the html tags, or whether you know javascript and css besides html. Depending on how much they expect from you they might go in deeper or ask you to code a quick sample page.

- Anyone can pick up a book on web design, so try to work into the interview other positive parts of yourself. Any skills or interests you think might come in handy. I'm assuming you built your own PC, so mention you're into PCs in general, both hardware and software. Having basic maintenance skills is a big deal and I've met many programmers who've never taken off a side panel. Even something as basic as "dedicated and curious" can make you a more interesting candidate.

- The place I work at is pretty informal, we use jeans and t-shirts but I did wear dressing shoes and dress shirt for my interview. I was clearly out of place but I'd rather overdress (not over the top though) than under do it.

- Ask about team sizes, technologies used, how communication works, company atmosphere and that kind of thing. I'm personally not very comfortable asking about payments and vacation policies right away, but that's just me. I just feel it's pretty cocky, I'd rather wait for them to contact me again or let me know I've actually got a chance.

 

and here's one last tip:

study. Prepare for it as if you're sure you will get the job, having at least some level of understanding in the topics will not only make you more confident during the interview but help you if you start working there. Hope this helps. Good luck!

 

Couldn't have said it any better.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

Start at home - learn as much as you can now. Maybe it's a bit too late to start coding, but at least learn what HTML, CSS, Javascript, PHP and SQL/MySQL are. Try and learn at least some of the basics if you have the time. This somewhat proves you are self motivated, and willing to learn despite an experience gap.

 

Think of what skills or traits you do have that you can bring to the job. Any hobbies or interests you have or sports/teams you participate in are advantages. 

 

Be enthusiastic. Instead of just being asked questions, ask questions - ask what you can bring to the company and how you can help them.That way even if you aren't fit for the position, you might snag a position in admin or intern or whatever and then you can work towards being a developer. 

 

Overdress - at the least business shirt and dark trousers, tie would be good. A full suit is usually fine - even if you are interviewing for McDonalds.  

 

Prove you want the job. Outline clearly why you want it.

 

Ask for feedback. If you don't get the job, you want to know what you could've done to improve. Ask if they can contact you with feedback, good or bad, about the interview.

 

Research the company. Know what they do, use some of their websites if you can and try and get a feel for the culture.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm a little shocked that a firm will interview with no experience, even for an entry level position?

When I started as a junior I was expected to know the fundamentals, technical questions in the interview etc.

 

Have you any experience with any kind of development work at all?

 

As mentioned, I would try and cram, HARD! Fundamentals of Web applications, software development, databases etc. As much as you can.

 

Regarding dress, if you have a suit, wear it. All my development jobs have been T-shirt and jeans affairs, but for an interview, always look smart and suit-up if at all possible, IMHO it's expected for an interview, even if the regular dress code is pretty casual.

 

And, good luck!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share


×