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Realistically the risk of leakage?

If I do everything cautiously and take my time, and I buy good quality fittings, what are the actual chances of a leak?

 

I only ask because just the idea of at any given time my entire computer could go bye bye from a leak and it worries me to no end lol

 

edit: I mean the chance of a leak any time AFTER the initial 24 hour (or however long) leak test. Does the tubing heat up and shrink over time, I'm assuming maintenance is recommended every several months?

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Build Log http://imgur.com/a/UV6Wh Just want to warn everyone, my build log is pretty mediocre.

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If you use non conductive coolant you shouldn't have a problem with leakage killing components...?

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If you use non conductive coolant you shouldn't have a problem with leakage killing components...?

Hmm... Always thought that was a myth. I'm probably wrong though

 

Oh that's how people have PC submerged in oil huh

Derp I'm dumb

Enthoo Primo - ASUS Maximus Formula VII - 4790k 4.8ghz 1.28v - EK Supremacy Evo Clean - 16GB Crucial Ballistix Tactical - 1000w EVGA Supernova Gold - 2x Alphacool Monsta Rads in push/pull - 2x Galaxy 780 HoF with EK waterblock
 
Build Log http://imgur.com/a/UV6Wh Just want to warn everyone, my build log is pretty mediocre.

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.. what are the actual chances of a leak?

 

2% from defective parts, 10% user error

you can service the system when ever, some go 3mo, some as long as 24mo.

depends on components, coolant and assembly skills.

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If you heavily pay attention, and double and triple check everything you do, the odds are very little.  

 

No fittings or any tubes leaked in my system, the only thing that leaked was a hole in my top 480mm rad and my cousin is the one to blame for that, he over-tightened a screw 

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If I do everything cautiously and take my time, and I buy good quality fittings, what are the actual chances of a leak?

 

I only ask because just the idea of at any given time my entire computer could go bye bye from a leak and it worries me to no end lol

 

edit: I mean the chance of a leak any time AFTER the initial 24 hour (or however long) leak test. Does the tubing heat up and shrink over time, I'm assuming maintenance is recommended every several months?

Contrary to what people say about water cooling, the chances of a leak is quiet high. Remembering to tighten all fittings, fill ports, pump tops, reservoirs can and is in most cases over looked. Then there is the way of developing a leak through over tightening parts and stripping the thread or using the wrong screws and puncturing your radiator or just plain forgetting to check compression fittings as over time the tubing shrinks and there is just that little extra turn that can be done to provide a proper seal, which is why i use barbs.

 

Which is why i always recommend leak testing your loop outside your build for 24hrs. This is enough time for a leak to develop and if one does, your parts will be safe. Also, so you can understand what is needed to build a leak free loop. 

A water-cooled mid-tier gaming PC.

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Contrary to what people say about water cooling, the chances of a leak is quiet high. Remembering to tighten all fittings, fill ports, pump tops, reservoirs can and is in most cases over looked. Then there is the way of developing a leak through over tightening parts and stripping the thread or using the wrong screws and puncturing your radiator or just plain forgetting to check compression fittings as over time the tubing shrinks and there is just that little extra turn that can be done to provide a proper seal, which is why i use barbs.

 

Which is why i always recommend leak testing your loop outside your build for 24hrs. This is enough time for a leak to develop and if one does, your parts will be safe. Also, so you can understand what is needed to build a leak free loop. 

The more I read about barbs the more I want to use them... Is there any disadvantages with them?

Enthoo Primo - ASUS Maximus Formula VII - 4790k 4.8ghz 1.28v - EK Supremacy Evo Clean - 16GB Crucial Ballistix Tactical - 1000w EVGA Supernova Gold - 2x Alphacool Monsta Rads in push/pull - 2x Galaxy 780 HoF with EK waterblock
 
Build Log http://imgur.com/a/UV6Wh Just want to warn everyone, my build log is pretty mediocre.

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The more I read about barbs the more I want to use them... Is there any disadvantages with them?

Only one IMO....they do not look as good as a compression. Barbs sort of look like a part is missing and less classy while a compression looks finished. Make no mistake, a compression fitting is a barb as well but instead of having any clamp to hold/secure the tubing it has its own retention system. However you can get around the leaking problem by purchasing a tube that is a bit smaller than the outer diameter a random compression fitting and to make it go over the lip of the barb of the compression fitting you just soak it in very warm water to soften it and the just use brute force to push it over the fitting and then it is highly unlikly to leak but it takes some muscle to get it done.

A water-cooled mid-tier gaming PC.

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If you use non conductive coolant you shouldn't have a problem with leakage killing components...?

 

Not true - this is a myth. Any coolant used can conduct and fry components. Been many chats about this on the forum. As @Ghost says, if you think so, feel free to soak your parts in your "non conductive" coolant. :)

 

Hmm... Always thought that was a myth. I'm probably wrong though

 

Oh that's how people have PC submerged in oil huh

Derp I'm dumb

 

This is a VERY specific build using mineral oil, which you cannot use in a normal water cooling loop. 

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Not true - this is a myth. Any coolant used can conduct and fry components. Been many chats about this on the forum. As @Ghost says, if you think so, feel free to soak your parts in your "non conductive" coolant. :)

 

 

This is a VERY specific build using mineral oil, which you cannot use in a normal water cooling loop. 

My rebuttal to this is any liquid can be a coolant, such as mineral oil. And to my understanding, that is non-conductive. :P

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