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Air conditioner on same circuit as two PCs?

I have two computers running in my shared office space with a combined maximum power draw of about 700-800 watts under full load. I'd like to use an air conditioner in the same room. The one I have is rated for 450 watts which leaves 1800 - 750 - 450 = 600 watts left over. I'm not sure what else is on the circuit but I think both computers and the air conditioner wouldn't trip the breaker. Even if it won't trip the breaker, is it a good idea to have an AC unit on the same circuit as the computers? I know there will be a voltage drop when the AC unit starts, so is this likely to be problematic?

PC Specs:

CPU: AMD 1700x Cooler: Corsair H100i V2 Motherboard: Asus Crosshair VI Hero RAM: 4 * 8GB G.Skill RGB DDR4 Graphics: EVGA GTX 1080 Ti SC2 Storage: Samsung 960 EVO 500GB Case: Fractal Design Meshify C PSU: EVGA 750w G3 Monitors: Dell SG2716DG +  2x Dell U2515H

 

Freenas specs:

CPU: Intel Xeon E5-2650 V2 Cooler: Some noctua cooler Motherboard: Supermicro X9 SRL-F RAM: 8 * 8GB Samsung DDR3 ECC Storage: 6 * 4TB Seagate 7200 RPM RAIDZ2 Controller: LSI H220 Case: Phanteks Enthoo Pro PSU: EVGA 650w G3

 

Phone: iPhone 6S 32 GB Space Grey

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I strongly would recommend against it. Also read the wattage on your AC unit, but give yourself a buffer. If you can handle 1800W, I wouldn't want it maxed out.

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Just now, Statik said:

I strongly would recommend against it. Also read the wattage on your AC unit, but give yourself a buffer. If you can handle 1800W, I wouldn't want it maxed out.

I have a 600 watt buffer assuming both computers are running at full load.

PC Specs:

CPU: AMD 1700x Cooler: Corsair H100i V2 Motherboard: Asus Crosshair VI Hero RAM: 4 * 8GB G.Skill RGB DDR4 Graphics: EVGA GTX 1080 Ti SC2 Storage: Samsung 960 EVO 500GB Case: Fractal Design Meshify C PSU: EVGA 750w G3 Monitors: Dell SG2716DG +  2x Dell U2515H

 

Freenas specs:

CPU: Intel Xeon E5-2650 V2 Cooler: Some noctua cooler Motherboard: Supermicro X9 SRL-F RAM: 8 * 8GB Samsung DDR3 ECC Storage: 6 * 4TB Seagate 7200 RPM RAIDZ2 Controller: LSI H220 Case: Phanteks Enthoo Pro PSU: EVGA 650w G3

 

Phone: iPhone 6S 32 GB Space Grey

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Depends on the wire gauge and breaker size.

 

You're wanting to look at current (Amps) not wattage, well I suppose you could break down the math........

 

If the breaker is hot, it will trip. 30amp might cover you. Most US homes are only 20 amps. You'll be running a hot breaker. (and possible wiring if the ground is shitty.)

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2 minutes ago, ShrimpBrime said:

Depends on the wire gauge and breaker size.

 

You're wanting to look at current (Amps) not wattage, well I suppose you could break down the math........

 

If the breaker is hot, it will trip. 30amp might cover you. Most US homes are only 20 amps. You'll be running a hot breaker. (and possible wiring if the ground is shitty.)

A 15 amp circuit at 120 V is 1800 watts, so a 450 watt AC unit is 3.75 amps.

PC Specs:

CPU: AMD 1700x Cooler: Corsair H100i V2 Motherboard: Asus Crosshair VI Hero RAM: 4 * 8GB G.Skill RGB DDR4 Graphics: EVGA GTX 1080 Ti SC2 Storage: Samsung 960 EVO 500GB Case: Fractal Design Meshify C PSU: EVGA 750w G3 Monitors: Dell SG2716DG +  2x Dell U2515H

 

Freenas specs:

CPU: Intel Xeon E5-2650 V2 Cooler: Some noctua cooler Motherboard: Supermicro X9 SRL-F RAM: 8 * 8GB Samsung DDR3 ECC Storage: 6 * 4TB Seagate 7200 RPM RAIDZ2 Controller: LSI H220 Case: Phanteks Enthoo Pro PSU: EVGA 650w G3

 

Phone: iPhone 6S 32 GB Space Grey

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1 minute ago, ThatFlashCat said:

A 15 amp circuit at 120 V is 1800 watts, so a 450 watt AC unit is 3.75 amps.

Not when the compressor starts up. 

Redo the math.

Edit> that's 110v/220v

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Competitive Benching Team - Warp9-Systems 

Save the old OC forums just by reading old school tec

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Just now, ShrimpBrime said:

Not when the compressor starts up. 

Redo the math.

True. I can pretty easily add another circuit, though.

PC Specs:

CPU: AMD 1700x Cooler: Corsair H100i V2 Motherboard: Asus Crosshair VI Hero RAM: 4 * 8GB G.Skill RGB DDR4 Graphics: EVGA GTX 1080 Ti SC2 Storage: Samsung 960 EVO 500GB Case: Fractal Design Meshify C PSU: EVGA 750w G3 Monitors: Dell SG2716DG +  2x Dell U2515H

 

Freenas specs:

CPU: Intel Xeon E5-2650 V2 Cooler: Some noctua cooler Motherboard: Supermicro X9 SRL-F RAM: 8 * 8GB Samsung DDR3 ECC Storage: 6 * 4TB Seagate 7200 RPM RAIDZ2 Controller: LSI H220 Case: Phanteks Enthoo Pro PSU: EVGA 650w G3

 

Phone: iPhone 6S 32 GB Space Grey

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14 minutes ago, ThatFlashCat said:

True. I can pretty easily add another circuit, though.

I would do it then

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14 minutes ago, ThatFlashCat said:

True. I can pretty easily add another circuit, though.

Well try it out.

If the breaker gets warm/hot, theres too much load.

My Fedders is 48000BTU and warms the breaker on a hot day. Alexa is the only thing on the same circuit.

 

 

- If it ain't broken, don't fix it! - - Your post codes and beep codes in the drop down below -

Competitive Benching Team - Warp9-Systems 

Save the old OC forums just by reading old school tec

https://forums.extremeoverclocking.com/index.php

They have the best F@H stats too. 

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48 minutes ago, ThatFlashCat said:

I have two computers running in my shared office space with a combined maximum power draw of about 700-800 watts under full load. I'd like to use an air conditioner in the same room. The one I have is rated for 450 watts which leaves 1800 - 750 - 450 = 600 watts left over. I'm not sure what else is on the circuit but I think both computers and the air conditioner wouldn't trip the breaker. Even if it won't trip the breaker, is it a good idea to have an AC unit on the same circuit as the computers? I know there will be a voltage drop when the AC unit starts, so is this likely to be problematic?

Not recommended. Generally anything with a high-power motor (AC, Vacuum, Power tools) should not be plugged into the same circuit as the computer, even a laptop. A laptop will survive, but you might kill the power brick/charger eventually.

 

If you have to do this, put your PC on a UPS, and DO NOT plug the AC into the UPS.

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I would advise against as well, the large inductive load the AC compressor pulls at startup can droop circuit voltage possibly below UVP on the power supply and trip it to shut off, even if it does not there can be a spike in the circuit when the compressor pops off suddenly as well (also an inductance thing I think) which can trip the power supply. In general you want clean power going into your PC, that would be very noisy power with the AC turning on/off.

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I'm considering putting all of the tech hardware on the new dedicated circuit, and then putting the AC on the existing circuit.

PC Specs:

CPU: AMD 1700x Cooler: Corsair H100i V2 Motherboard: Asus Crosshair VI Hero RAM: 4 * 8GB G.Skill RGB DDR4 Graphics: EVGA GTX 1080 Ti SC2 Storage: Samsung 960 EVO 500GB Case: Fractal Design Meshify C PSU: EVGA 750w G3 Monitors: Dell SG2716DG +  2x Dell U2515H

 

Freenas specs:

CPU: Intel Xeon E5-2650 V2 Cooler: Some noctua cooler Motherboard: Supermicro X9 SRL-F RAM: 8 * 8GB Samsung DDR3 ECC Storage: 6 * 4TB Seagate 7200 RPM RAIDZ2 Controller: LSI H220 Case: Phanteks Enthoo Pro PSU: EVGA 650w G3

 

Phone: iPhone 6S 32 GB Space Grey

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