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Delicieuxz

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About Delicieuxz

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    Veteran

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    i7 2600k @ 4.6 Ghz
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    Asus P8P67 Pro Rev 3.1
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    Patriot Viper Xtreme 16GB @ 1866 Mhz
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    EVGA GTX 1070 SC @ 2101 core / 4663 memory
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    Corsair 600T
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    OCZ 1250 watt
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    HP Omen 32
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    Noctua NH-D15
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    Logitech G402
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    Auzentech X-Fi Prelude
  • Operating System
    Windows 7 / Windows 10

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  1. I think that this is really cool: Today I looked into Canada's stance on purchased software and found that Canada has what might be the most clear and unequivocal wording supporting software ownership that I've yet seen. In the government of Canada's Goods and Services Manual, classes 1 - 34 are goods, and classes 35 - 45 are services. "Computer programs and software" are included in Class 9: ------------------------------------------------------------------Class 9Scientific, nautical, surveying, photographic, cinematographic, optical, weighing, measuring, signalling, checking (supervision), life-saving and teaching apparatus and instruments; apparatus and instruments for conducting, switching, transforming, accumulating, regulating or controlling electricity; apparatus for recording, transmission or reproduction of sound or images; magnetic data carriers, recording discs; compact discs, DVDs and other digital recording media; mechanisms for coin-operated apparatus; cash registers, calculating machines, data processing equipment, computers; computer software; fire-extinguishing apparatus.This Class includes, in particular: apparatus and instruments for scientific research in laboratories; apparatus and instruments for controlling ships, such as apparatus and instruments for measuring and for transmitting orders; protractors; punched card office machines; all computer programs and software regardless of recording media or means of dissemination, that is, software recorded on magnetic media or downloaded from a remote computer network. ------------------------------------------------------------------ I'm happy to find such a clear position in Canada's laws. As a good, software is therefore a private property that is purchased and owned by its purchasers, who then possess all normal property rights over the software they've purchased. Also, the Australian High Court's reasoning in its judgment against Valve on the basis that Australian consumer law classifies software as a good and not a service (contrary to Valve's submitted argument that it should represent a service) therefore can be assumed to also apply in Canada. I've added that information into the OP's bullet points, and I've also updated the bullets points for the EU and Australian judgments declaring software as a good that people purchase and own and possess all normal property rights regarding.
  2. Delicieuxz

    Free Games (For Free)

    I think it was to promote an upcoming TV show based on Alan Wake, and also to try to build some favour from the PC gaming community for the Windows Store. An Alan Wake TV show is in the works Maybe if the show is popular, an Alan Wake 2 will be made.
  3. Delicieuxz

    Free Games (For Free)

    They were removed, but they're back now after Microsoft re-licensed the music for them. Good thing, too, because the first game is pretty much a masterpiece. I haven't played the American Nightmare DLC.
  4. Here are key parts of the Australian High Court's 2016 judgment that Valve sells game software, not merely licenses, and that the people who purchase games from Steam become owners of the software, and not merely of a license to use the software: http://www.judgments.fedcourt.gov.au/judgments/Judgments/fca/single/2016/2016fca0196 Today I also looked up Canada's stance on "Computer programs and software", described as Class 9 goods in Canada's Goods and Services Manual, in which classes 1 - 34 are goods, and classes 35 - 45 are services.  ------------------------------------------------------------------Class 9Scientific, nautical, surveying, photographic, cinematographic, optical, weighing, measuring, signalling, checking (supervision), life-saving and teaching apparatus and instruments; apparatus and instruments for conducting, switching, transforming, accumulating, regulating or controlling electricity; apparatus for recording, transmission or reproduction of sound or images; magnetic data carriers, recording discs; compact discs, DVDs and other digital recording media; mechanisms for coin-operated apparatus; cash registers, calculating machines, data processing equipment, computers; computer software; fire-extinguishing apparatus.This Class includes, in particular: apparatus and instruments for scientific research in laboratories; apparatus and instruments for controlling ships, such as apparatus and instruments for measuring and for transmitting orders; protractors; punched card office machines; all computer programs and software regardless of recording media or means of dissemination, that is, software recorded on magnetic media or downloaded from a remote computer network. ------------------------------------------------------------------ I'm happy to find such clear wording in Canada's laws. As a good, software is therefore a private property that is purchased and owned by its purchasers, who then possess all normal property rights over the software they've purchased. Also, the Australian High Court's reasoning in its judgment against Valve on the basis that Australian consumer law classifies software as a good and not a service (contrary to Valve's submitted argument that it should represent a service) therefore can be assumed to also apply in Canada. I've added that information into the OP's bullet points, and I've also updated the bullets points for the EU and Australian judgments declaring software as a good that people purchase and own and possess all normal property rights regarding.
  5. Yeah, the 'disable the WU service' method stopped working with Windows 10 1709.
  6. The Group Policy setting has been working for me in Windows 10 Enterprise. Which OS setting didn't work for you? There are also a lot of additional methods given in this link:
  7. Clicking "check for updates" should do precisely that: Check for updates, but not download them. You know, like "check for updates" works in Windows 7. Any available updates should be listed after checking for them, and then people should have to and get to press a button to download those updates if they want to. Maybe disabling Windows Update entirely would be a better thing to do for benchmarking. I have a link in my signature to a guide with methods to disable WU.
  8. Delicieuxz

    windows 7, 8, 10 performance with same hardware?

    I have never used Windows 8(.1) so I don't know from personal experience, but it doesn't look to me like Windows 8 is particularly overall faster in read / write tests (obviously, Windows 8 and 10 have faster boot times than Windows 7). Edit: I'm not sure that this is a good benchmark comparison video. They highlight the max rate instead of the average rate, and the Win 7 system could be used while the Win 8 system could be a fresh install.
  9. Delicieuxz

    Downsides To Having Multiple Operating Systems

    I installed Windows 7 and 10 on the same SSD, different partitions, and I have no issues when installing Windows 10 updates. I think I installed the non-UEFI versions, so maybe that's why. There's no reason to use UEFI, IMO, and since it seems to cause issues after Windows 10 updates for people with dual-booting I personally will avoid it. Actually, I avoid Windows 10 updates in general, because they generally cause so many major issues.
  10. Delicieuxz

    windows 7, 8, 10 performance with same hardware?

    Performance wise, they vary from game to game. A lot of games are comparable in performance, while some games or game-engines are appreciably faster in one OS rather than the other. If you want to play specific games, then I suggest looking up specific OS-comparison benchmarks for those games. Performance aside, Windows 7 is a smoother gaming experience without doing any additional tweaking of your OS. At the same time, UWP games won't run in Windows 7. But then, do you want to play UWP games?
  11. Delicieuxz

    FREE game at GOG

    Full Throttle is a great game!
  12. Remember ZeniMax' lawsuit against Facebook? That lawsuit saw ZeniMax, Bethesda's parent company (though Bethesda is the original company and created ZeniMax, I'm guessing to serve as a buffer against lawsuits), seeking up to $6 billion in damages from Facebook based on the allegation that former id Software owner and subsequent Bethesda employee (after he sold id Software to Bethesda) John Carmack stole ZeniMax' proprietary code and used it in the software for the Oculus VR headset. In the original trial, ZeniMax lost all of their core arguments against Facebook and Oculus but the jury did decide to award them $500 million in compensation for Palmer Luckey's breach of an NDA and for false designation (which I think had something to do with Oculus using DOOM in a demo of theirs). So, after the first trial was over, Facebook vowed to appeal the $500 million verdict. And they did, and they were successful in doing so, getting the $500 million verdict halved to $250 million: June 2018: US Judge halves ZeniMax's $500m win in Facebook Oculus legal battle In that appeals trial, ZeniMax had tried to get $500 million added to their initial $500 million award and an injunction against the selling of the Oculus VR headset. They also asked to get 20% of the profits of Oculus' future profits for the next 10 years: (June 2017) Injunction hearing started this week, with Zenimax asking for $500 million additional damages and a 20% cut of Oculus' revenue Needless to say, ZeniMax didn't get any of that, and instead lost an additional $250 million from their initial $500 million award. I'm guessing that Facebook planned to next appeal that $250 million verdict as the entire matter has now been withdrawn from the court entirely with ZeniMax and Facebook agreeing to settle out of court for an undisclosed set of money or terms. December 2018: ZeniMax Agrees to Settle Facebook VR Lawsuit That ZeniMax was willing to settle out of court at this point indicates that ZeniMax thought, or feared they would also lose the next appeals trial. After all, who withdraws from a $250 million lawsuit when they believe in their argument and think that they're going to win the case and get the full $250 million? Also, despite ZeniMax saying they are now "fully satisfied" with the outcome, ZeniMax previously claimed each step of the way that their arguments were valid and that the verdicts in their favour (though they were actually for things that weren't a part of ZeniMax' original arguments) proved such. If ZeniMax believed their original arguments and their subsequent awards were legitimate, then how could they be fully satisfied with an outcome that comprehensively denies those original arguments and awards? Obviously, ZeniMax was unjustly fishing for cash anywhere they thought they could lie to get some and are now trying to save face with disingenuous PR statements that defy the reality of the outcome which is totally against them. Personally, I think this outcome is deserved (providing not too much money was paid out) as I see Bethesda / ZeniMax as being one of the most evil and greedy companies in the games industry. If you're interested in why, I've put an overview of Bethesda / ZeniMax' history of cheating people and screwing other developers over with predatory practices, baseless accusations, and frivolous lawsuits into this post:
  13. Delicieuxz

    Russia threatens to ban Google

    But, who is the "civilized world"? The West does the same things talked about in this thread. So, how can we withdraw our support from the West? And the West finances the world's dictatorships (which Russia is not one of). Notably the US, finances around 73% of the world's dictatorships. List of authoritarian regimes supported by the United States - internet archive version US Provides Military Aid To More Than 70 Percent Of World’s Dictatorships
  14. Delicieuxz

    Russia threatens to ban Google

    You make it sound like Russia is similar to China in blocking websites, when the internet in Russia is about as open as it is in Canada and the US. There aren't that many blocked websites in Russia, and the sites that are blocked relate to things like terrorism, child pornography, suicide, etc. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_websites_blocked_in_Russia The threat against Google is again due to access to terrorism-advocating materials, which the Russian government doesn't want to be linked-to. Also, some websites are blocked by Google in the West in the very same manner that Russia is asking Google to do for Russia. For example, Google doesn't give torrent page results for large torrent sites like Pirate Bay. There is also Russia's blocking of a website like Telegram because the site wouldn't comply with handing over encryption keys to assist in criminal investigations. While I don't agree that Telegram or any site should have to hand over encryption keys, Russia is not different from some of the West in this regard: US, Canada, UK, New Zealand, Australia, threaten to force encryption backdoors, say 'privacy is not absolute Leaked documents reveal UK government is planning to BAN encryption to get access to your WhatsApp messages And there is also the factor that some of these blocks on US companies are a result of push-back from Russia after the US government banned Russian-made software and companies. So, it looks to me like Russia's internet is the same as it is in the West.
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