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Delicieuxz

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  1. Agree
    Delicieuxz got a reaction from ne0tic in Bethesda is embroiled in a new potentially billion-dollar lawsuit which could delay Microsoft's acquisition of ZeniMax   
    I think you haven't given it the thought it's warranted.
     
    If the lawyers presenting the case seek $1 billion or more in compensation, then that's the potential cost of the lawsuit.
     
    If Microsoft completes the purchase of ZeniMax now, then, should Bethesda ultimately lose this lawsuit, Microsoft will be on the hook for potentially another billion dollars on top of what they would have already paid for ZeniMax. That would mean that Microsoft's purchase of Bethesda changed from a $7.5 billion acquisition to an $8.5 billion acquisition. And that's a big difference.
     
    But if Microsoft waits for the lawsuit to play-out before completing the acquisition, the cost of the lawsuit would be the responsibility of ZeniMax' current owners, and they would then have to bear the potentially billion-dollar loss before selling the company to Microsoft.
     
    There are other possibilities, such as settling out-of-court so that Microsoft's acquisition can proceed without delay, or Microsoft reaching a deal with ZeniMax' current owners whereby Microsoft completes the purchase now and should the lawsuit be lost, then the current owners will be responsible to cover the court's judgment.
     
    But I don't get how you assume that the case doesn't stand to impact Microsoft's acquisition of the company. Because it possibly can.
  2. Informative
    Delicieuxz got a reaction from Taf the Ghost in Bethesda is embroiled in a new potentially billion-dollar lawsuit which could delay Microsoft's acquisition of ZeniMax   
    Bethesda faces broad class-action lawsuit over Fallout 4 DLC as Microsoft takeover looms
     
    A clarification there: Robert Altman was ZeniMax' co-founder, not sole founder. And he was basically a scumbag who stole the company from Bethesda's founder, Christopher Weaver. And his litigious and greedy nature while running ZeniMax / Bethesda is detailed here.
     
    Continuing with another excerpt from the article:
     
    The lawsuit cites Bethesda's Fallout 4 season-pass advertising as stating:
     
    “To reward our most loyal fans, this time we’ll be offering a Season Pass that will get you all of the Fallout 4 DLC we ever do for just $30. Since we’re still hard at work on the game, we don’t know what the actual DLC will be yet, but it will start coming early next year. Based on what we did for Oblivion, Fallout 3, and Skyrim, we know that it will be worth at least $40, and if we do more, you’ll get it all with the Season Pass.”
     
    So, Bethesda initially promised that purchasers of the Fallout 4 season pass would get all DLC for the game for free. Then they betrayed that promise and made Fallout 4 season-pass purchasers have to pay more for a huge amount of Fallout 4's DLC.
     
    Coincidentally, Bethesda did the same thing regarding Fallout '76, before switching Fallout '76's DLC to requiring micro-transactions at insane prices from Bethesda's paid-mods store. Could there be another lawsuit ready to go there? I don't recall whether Bethesda switched to the paid-mods MTX model for Fallout '76 before or after it launched. If was before, then they might be able to say they legitimately changed people's expectations ahead of their purchasing of the game. But if it was after, then it would likely be in the same boat as Fallout 4's paid-mods bait-and-switch and would be a good opening for another lawsuit against Bethesda.
     
     
     
    Those are my most direct thoughts on the news article and the Bethesda-corruption it is about.
     
    But I want to bring attention to the part of the article which says, "attorneys in the class-action say that they are shocked at some of the legal mistakes that Bethesda has made in the case involving the downloadable content (DLC) for Fallout 4".
     
    I've expressed and emphasized in many posts on the LTT forums and elsewhere that the software industry has essentially created an imaginary legal regime where they claim all kinds of powers which they don't actually legally have, and that what software publishers claim regarding your and their rights, most of all in their EULAs, is typically ignorable because they just make it up and rely on the power of intimidation through a false appearance of authority to cultivate the perceptions and behaviours they wish to have from their customers.
     
    I recently explained the phenomena of the mostly-fake legal regime software publishers (and many developers) have bought into like this:
     
    And, deservedly, they keep receiving severe smack-downs by courts around the world.
     
    The legal team bringing this new class-action lawsuit against Bethesda say Bethesda's legal practices have been shocking in their flagrant non-legality. But there are equally 'shocking' practices to be found all over the gaming industry, which has built and conducted itself upon what I think is a legal house of cards. And they did it simply because they followed a monkey-see / monkey-do approach to earlier publishers, who themselves were rarely challenged on anything they did, no matter how unlawful and abusive it was.
     
    Consequently, I think that the realm of software publisher pseudo-legal dogmas is ripe for the plundering. They've avoided lawsuits just because they haven't been examined by more skillful lawyers in other legal sectors who understand the law as it's meant and applied everywhere else better than the software industry has imagined and pretended it to be.
     
     
    Additionally, even if a software industry knows that the law isn't what they're claiming it to be in EULAs or similar, the fact that their job is a hired advocate for their publisher employer means it's very likely to probably that they won't tell you the truth anyway, because that would be contrary to what their job is to do. A lawyer is not a legal truth-teller, but is an advocate for hire - which often means that they're a liar for hire, lying for the benefit of their employer.
     
    And here's some research about that: UMass researcher finds most people lie in everyday conversation
     
    Starting from the unfortunate perspective that most people are liars, then look at where the biggest and worst liars are concentrated in society: The Top 10 Jobs That Attract Psychopaths
     
    The profession with the highest concentration of psychopaths (having no compunction about lying, especially when it profits oneself, to lie being a key trait of a psychopath) is that of a CEO. And the second most-populated-by-psychopaths profession is that of a Lawyer. So, in software industry pseudo-legal-speak, there are layers of maximum-intensity ruthless willingness to lie and deceive to get a desired outcome that benefits the publisher. And in ZeniMax / Bethesda's case, their CEO was a lawyer from the dirtiest pool of dirty-politics lawyers, and one which exemplified the greedy and selfish tendencies that give CEOs, lawyers, and big publishers their deservedly-bad reputations.
     
    Media Personality and Journalist are also among the top 10 professions most-populated by psychopaths (AKA pathological and unrepentant liars) - I want to point that out while on the topic of who not to trust.
     
     
    The lesson here is, from my perspective, don't just accept what a software industry lawyer claims the law is (maybe consider suing their employer, instead). They're usually either clueless themselves and spouting a nonsensical dogma and industry-bubble convention that doesn't actually register as real in the law and courts, or they're deliberately lying to protect their employers, their industry, their professional reputations, and their personal profits from their profession. A lawyer who makes a lot of money by writing EULAs isn't going to easily concede that what they're doing and have been doing is playing pretend with themselves and their employers - doing so would hurt their pride and their wallets when they stop being hired to write EULAs which are legally completely meaningless and irrelevant regarding software which you've purchased.
  3. Agree
    Delicieuxz reacted to Master Disaster in Valve Ordered to Give Apple Information on 436 Steam Games As Part of Epic Games Legal Case   
    That's not the issue though. Apple are launching their toys out of the pram with a trebuchet and trying to take everyone else down with them.
     
    They're trying to demonstrate that 30% is reasonable and that other stores make just as much money as they do.
     
    Essentially they either want to get off with it on the fact others are also doing it or ensure that any ruling applies to their competitors as well.
  4. Informative
    Delicieuxz got a reaction from JLO64 in Bethesda is embroiled in a new potentially billion-dollar lawsuit which could delay Microsoft's acquisition of ZeniMax   
    Bethesda faces broad class-action lawsuit over Fallout 4 DLC as Microsoft takeover looms
     
    A clarification there: Robert Altman was ZeniMax' co-founder, not sole founder. And he was basically a scumbag who stole the company from Bethesda's founder, Christopher Weaver. And his litigious and greedy nature while running ZeniMax / Bethesda is detailed here.
     
    Continuing with another excerpt from the article:
     
    The lawsuit cites Bethesda's Fallout 4 season-pass advertising as stating:
     
    “To reward our most loyal fans, this time we’ll be offering a Season Pass that will get you all of the Fallout 4 DLC we ever do for just $30. Since we’re still hard at work on the game, we don’t know what the actual DLC will be yet, but it will start coming early next year. Based on what we did for Oblivion, Fallout 3, and Skyrim, we know that it will be worth at least $40, and if we do more, you’ll get it all with the Season Pass.”
     
    So, Bethesda initially promised that purchasers of the Fallout 4 season pass would get all DLC for the game for free. Then they betrayed that promise and made Fallout 4 season-pass purchasers have to pay more for a huge amount of Fallout 4's DLC.
     
    Coincidentally, Bethesda did the same thing regarding Fallout '76, before switching Fallout '76's DLC to requiring micro-transactions at insane prices from Bethesda's paid-mods store. Could there be another lawsuit ready to go there? I don't recall whether Bethesda switched to the paid-mods MTX model for Fallout '76 before or after it launched. If was before, then they might be able to say they legitimately changed people's expectations ahead of their purchasing of the game. But if it was after, then it would likely be in the same boat as Fallout 4's paid-mods bait-and-switch and would be a good opening for another lawsuit against Bethesda.
     
     
     
    Those are my most direct thoughts on the news article and the Bethesda-corruption it is about.
     
    But I want to bring attention to the part of the article which says, "attorneys in the class-action say that they are shocked at some of the legal mistakes that Bethesda has made in the case involving the downloadable content (DLC) for Fallout 4".
     
    I've expressed and emphasized in many posts on the LTT forums and elsewhere that the software industry has essentially created an imaginary legal regime where they claim all kinds of powers which they don't actually legally have, and that what software publishers claim regarding your and their rights, most of all in their EULAs, is typically ignorable because they just make it up and rely on the power of intimidation through a false appearance of authority to cultivate the perceptions and behaviours they wish to have from their customers.
     
    I recently explained the phenomena of the mostly-fake legal regime software publishers (and many developers) have bought into like this:
     
    And, deservedly, they keep receiving severe smack-downs by courts around the world.
     
    The legal team bringing this new class-action lawsuit against Bethesda say Bethesda's legal practices have been shocking in their flagrant non-legality. But there are equally 'shocking' practices to be found all over the gaming industry, which has built and conducted itself upon what I think is a legal house of cards. And they did it simply because they followed a monkey-see / monkey-do approach to earlier publishers, who themselves were rarely challenged on anything they did, no matter how unlawful and abusive it was.
     
    Consequently, I think that the realm of software publisher pseudo-legal dogmas is ripe for the plundering. They've avoided lawsuits just because they haven't been examined by more skillful lawyers in other legal sectors who understand the law as it's meant and applied everywhere else better than the software industry has imagined and pretended it to be.
     
     
    Additionally, even if a software industry knows that the law isn't what they're claiming it to be in EULAs or similar, the fact that their job is a hired advocate for their publisher employer means it's very likely to probably that they won't tell you the truth anyway, because that would be contrary to what their job is to do. A lawyer is not a legal truth-teller, but is an advocate for hire - which often means that they're a liar for hire, lying for the benefit of their employer.
     
    And here's some research about that: UMass researcher finds most people lie in everyday conversation
     
    Starting from the unfortunate perspective that most people are liars, then look at where the biggest and worst liars are concentrated in society: The Top 10 Jobs That Attract Psychopaths
     
    The profession with the highest concentration of psychopaths (having no compunction about lying, especially when it profits oneself, to lie being a key trait of a psychopath) is that of a CEO. And the second most-populated-by-psychopaths profession is that of a Lawyer. So, in software industry pseudo-legal-speak, there are layers of maximum-intensity ruthless willingness to lie and deceive to get a desired outcome that benefits the publisher. And in ZeniMax / Bethesda's case, their CEO was a lawyer from the dirtiest pool of dirty-politics lawyers, and one which exemplified the greedy and selfish tendencies that give CEOs, lawyers, and big publishers their deservedly-bad reputations.
     
    Media Personality and Journalist are also among the top 10 professions most-populated by psychopaths (AKA pathological and unrepentant liars) - I want to point that out while on the topic of who not to trust.
     
     
    The lesson here is, from my perspective, don't just accept what a software industry lawyer claims the law is (maybe consider suing their employer, instead). They're usually either clueless themselves and spouting a nonsensical dogma and industry-bubble convention that doesn't actually register as real in the law and courts, or they're deliberately lying to protect their employers, their industry, their professional reputations, and their personal profits from their profession. A lawyer who makes a lot of money by writing EULAs isn't going to easily concede that what they're doing and have been doing is playing pretend with themselves and their employers - doing so would hurt their pride and their wallets when they stop being hired to write EULAs which are legally completely meaningless and irrelevant regarding software which you've purchased.
  5. Like
    Delicieuxz reacted to Arika S in Your favourite forum member?   
    Favourite is probably the wrong word, but I'd say the ones I respect the most are @leadeater @Delicieuxz and @LAwLz
  6. Like
    Delicieuxz reacted to Arika S in Bethesda is embroiled in a new potentially billion-dollar lawsuit which could delay Microsoft's acquisition of ZeniMax   
    I know it wasn't fallout 4, but I just want to say:
     
    "Canvas Bags"
  7. Agree
    Delicieuxz reacted to RejZoR in EA and BioWare have officially given up on their revamp of Anthem   
    EA is just so weird. They were considering totally redesigning totally broken game like Anthem for months and now finally gave up officially. They released NFS Heat and which only needed few extra fixes and touchups and some extra content and it would be the best NFS EA released in years and they just abandoned it entirely after just 3 months. No considerations or anything, just dropped it like it's nothing. Their priorities are really fucked up.
  8. Informative
    Delicieuxz reacted to Lurick in Canada to follow Australia's lead in taxing Facebook for news links, gov't says they won't be intimidated by Facebook's threats   
    Following Facebook's blocking Australian news links the Australian news sites saw traffic skyrocket by double digits. More information here:
    https://www.techdirt.com/articles/20210220/23410646285/australian-news-sites-shocked-upset-to-learn-they-dont-need-to-rely-facebook-traffic.shtml
  9. Informative
    Delicieuxz reacted to robigan in Canada to follow Australia's lead in taxing Facebook for news links, gov't says they won't be intimidated by Facebook's threats   
    Dunno if some1 already replied in the same way as I. But they cannot blacklist news sites bc the legislations prevent that. Saying that they cannot blacklist news sites and cannot prioritize news companies from outside the country
  10. Agree
    Delicieuxz reacted to leadeater in Canada to follow Australia's lead in taxing Facebook for news links, gov't says they won't be intimidated by Facebook's threats   
    Well the one hope I have if journalism is no longer so desperate for cash that they are willing to do ANYTHING, which they do now, that they can return to delivering on quality journalism. Not that I think this will change that, but better funding would help.
     
    On the other hand I don't think news sources should be or have to be primarily focused on profit making and profitability because that does nothing but create an environment where facts no longer matter and opinions and public support are king, that ain't news.
  11. Informative
    Delicieuxz reacted to Spindel in Sweden preparing new IP law to put pressure on actors like Facebook   
    Summary
    ”Efter ett lagförslag som tvingar Facebook att betala medier för att få dela deras innehåll har bolaget blockerat alla nyheter på plattformen i Australien. En liknande lagförslag är på gång även i Sverige, vilket välkomnas av branschorganisationen Tidningsutgivarna.”

    Rough translation:
    ”Following the purposed law that forces Facebook to pay media companies for shared content (on the platform) the company (Facebook) has blocked all news on their platform in Australia. A similar law is under constriction in Sweden, which is welcomed by the branch organization Tidningsutgivarna (Newspaper publishers).”
     
    Quotes
     

     
     
    My thoughts
    I think a regulation of this is needed and we might see a reshuffeling of the status of social platforms.
     
    Sources
    (In swedish)
    https://www.svt.se/kultur/ny-svensk-lag-ska-pressa-facebook
  12. Informative
    Delicieuxz got a reaction from multifrag in Canada to follow Australia's lead in taxing Facebook for news links, gov't says they won't be intimidated by Facebook's threats   
    Google can do that, and Google threatened to do that. In response, Microsoft said they support Australia's demand for compensation and said they would be happy to fill the space left by Google. After that, Google backed-down on its threat.
     
    Microsoft says it would never ‘threaten to leave’ Australia after Google said it could withdraw search engine
     
    Microsoft also wants the US to adopt the same link-tax plan as Australia.
     
    Microsoft tells Biden administration to adopt Australia’s pay-for-news plan
    Microsoft’s Endorsement of Australia’s Proposal on Technology and the News
  13. Agree
    Delicieuxz got a reaction from Taf the Ghost in Canada to follow Australia's lead in taxing Facebook for news links, gov't says they won't be intimidated by Facebook's threats   
    Microsoft might be on-board because the move harms their competitors and stands to gain Microsoft a larger market share if platforms opt to block Australian or other countries' content.
     
    As the Register article notes:
     
  14. Informative
    Delicieuxz got a reaction from Taf the Ghost in Canada to follow Australia's lead in taxing Facebook for news links, gov't says they won't be intimidated by Facebook's threats   
    Google can do that, and Google threatened to do that. In response, Microsoft said they support Australia's demand for compensation and said they would be happy to fill the space left by Google. After that, Google backed-down on its threat.
     
    Microsoft says it would never ‘threaten to leave’ Australia after Google said it could withdraw search engine
     
    Microsoft also wants the US to adopt the same link-tax plan as Australia.
     
    Microsoft tells Biden administration to adopt Australia’s pay-for-news plan
    Microsoft’s Endorsement of Australia’s Proposal on Technology and the News
  15. Informative
    Delicieuxz got a reaction from Taf the Ghost in Canada to follow Australia's lead in taxing Facebook for news links, gov't says they won't be intimidated by Facebook's threats   
    Pay up, Zuck: Canada allies with Australia in ‘battle’ against Facebook over news content
     
    As has been previously reported, Australia planned to implement a link tax to create revenue for its domestic news outlets whenever someone accessed an article of theirs through search engines and social media sites.
     
    In reaction, Google and Facebook threatened to withdraw their services from Australia. Google backed-down after Microsoft made clear it was ready and eager to step-in and fill the search-engine void that would be left by Google. But I guess Microsoft didn't also have a Facebook replacement on-hand, and so Facebook didn't also back down.
     
    In response to Australia moving ahead with drafting legislation to tax media-sharing sites, Facebook has blocked the sharing of any links from Australia.
     
     
     
    But this post claims it goes even further, saying that people from Australia can no longer share any news-related links, period. I wonder if that claim is accurate, or if she meant that they just can't share Australian news links / news links created by Australians even when they're hosted on a platform that is based outside of Australia.
     

     
     
    Canada's government had previously announced its intention to tax media links and that it was monitoring developments in France and Australia regarding securing compensation for domestic news outlets from media-sharing sites.
     
     
    I think this is a mixed bag of negatives and positives. Taking revenue, and therefore power, away from tech giants who honestly don't deserve nearly what they've gained through their shady, exploitative, and manipulative business models is a good thing. But Australian and Canadian content disappearing from media sites is a bad thing. But then, if enough countries do this, so that media-sharing sites have no alternative but to allow their content, then that's a good thing. And if Facebook doesn't yield and it results in other platforms permanently taking-away Facebook's market share, I think that's also a good thing.
  16. Agree
    Delicieuxz got a reaction from TraficLightLicker in World Wide Web creator, Tim Berners-Lee, sad to see his invention being used for evil, hatches plan to take it back   
    Tim Berners-Lee’s plan to save the internet: give us back control of our data
     
     
    World Wide Web inventor Tim Berners-Lee takes on Google, Facebook, Amazon to fix the internet
     
    That sounds like a silly conclusion, to me. Yes, personal data shouldn't be looked-at firstly as monetary value, because it isn't firstly a monetary thing and it has no monetary value if it isn't for sale per the will of the person who owns it. But no, personal data isn't owned by society, each individual person's personal data is owned by them. Suggesting it is owned by society sounds like a way to concede that it doesn't belong to corporations while rationalizing that industries should have some means of access to it all the same.
     
     
    In general, I think that Tim Berners-Lee's plan is a positive idea, compared to where things are. But I think that most of that data should be prohibited by law from being collected and stored in the first place. And what happens if Inrupt's data-stores are hacked? There goes the privacy the privacy and personal control of one's data that the idea was meant to protect.
     
    I think the issue needs to be addressed at its source rather than with a coping mechanism which I think would be destined to fail. At some point, likely even from the outset, governments would have gained access to that vault of information and the public likely won't know about it when it happens.
     
     
    The business of harvesting data is a dirty, illegitimate, predatory, and hypocritical one. It is making money through the exploitation and manipulation of people and is a crime - and not just a moral one (though, it is definitely a moral one):
     
    What do you think would happen if you were to hook a Bitcoin mining operation up to the electricity supply of some business you don't own, without their permission and without compensating them? If they found out, they would have you arrested and if the operation was significant, they'd sue you, and would probably get to seize any profits you'd made while using their electricity.
     
    There's not really even a need to frame things in cryptocoin-mining terms. Imagine that you decided to start using various businesses computers, electricity, employee activities, software, housing, as data farms for your own project, just like they're doing with our PCs. Same thing's going to happen: You'll be arrested and charged, probably sued, and any profits you made will probably be seized and given to the corporation.
     
    But tech companies are doing the same thing to us and they're not being punished for it in any way. In generating and harvesting data from our particular usage and via interaction with our devices, tech companies are using our electricity, our hardware, our storage and management of our hardware, our software, our time, our personal activity, for their own commercial purposes, and all without a commercial license. They're stealing. And it's crazy that it's been allowed to progress this far, that the public is in a stupor and doesn't understand that this isn't right.
     
    Somehow, the public, governments, and regulators have been lured into a stupor and coma regarding the topic just because tech companies started doing these things before there was any understanding of them, and so now people feel like it's just the way things are. But that's like thinking that stealing what isn't yours and slavery are just the way things are.
     
    Tech companies whose business is mining and selling data are stealing from us in the same way that a politician who steals millions of dollars out of the treasury is stealing from their constituents. Even though the millions of dollars they stole amounts to a few dollars, or even less than a dollar per person, the smallness of the stealing from each individual doesn't make it not stealing.
     
     
     
     
    Some methods to reduce the amount of data being stolen from you and used for commercial and manipulative purposes include:
     
    - Using DuckDuckGo for web searches. They don't store or share any personal data.
     
    - Using only an Enterprise or LTSC edition of Windows 10 as they afford for lowering the amount of data Microsoft takes from you beyond what Home and Pro allow. And Microsoft is tracking every mouse-click you make in Windows 10.
     
    - Using ProtonMail for you email. It has end-to-end encryption and your inbox is encrypted with a user encryption key so that ProtonMail can't view it, either.
     
    - Installing Electronic Frontier Foundation's browser plugin Privacy Badger [2] [3], which blocks a lot of tracking scripts.
     
    - Possibly using an ad-blocker to reduce the amount of tracking and advertisement scripts websites can run when you browse their website.
     
    - Making use of FireFox browser's built-in Facebook-tracking-blocking feature.
     
    - Using your iPhones built-in option to block all tracking by apps.
     
    - Setting your DNS resolver to Cloudflare's free 1.1.1.1 service. This prevents your ISP from recording your activity and searches and selling it. Cloudflare doesn't collect or sell any of your data and doesn't record any IPs. Cloudflare also has a mobile app that sets your mobile internet usage to its 1.1.1.1 service. Cloudflare say of their 1.1.1.1 service:
     
     
    If you know of additional methods to secure your data and privacy, please share them.
  17. Agree
    Delicieuxz got a reaction from gabrielcarvfer in Canada to follow Australia's lead in taxing Facebook for news links, gov't says they won't be intimidated by Facebook's threats   
    Google can do that, and Google threatened to do that. In response, Microsoft said they support Australia's demand for compensation and said they would be happy to fill the space left by Google. After that, Google backed-down on its threat.
     
    Microsoft says it would never ‘threaten to leave’ Australia after Google said it could withdraw search engine
     
    Microsoft also wants the US to adopt the same link-tax plan as Australia.
     
    Microsoft tells Biden administration to adopt Australia’s pay-for-news plan
    Microsoft’s Endorsement of Australia’s Proposal on Technology and the News
  18. Informative
    Delicieuxz reacted to Spotty in Facebook restricts access to Australian News post and article after Parliament Lower House passes Media Baragining Code   
    *Shocked pikachu face* Australian News websites have seen a pretty noticeable dip in traffic since Facebook put the news ban in place.
     
    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-02-19/facebook-referral-traffic-down-news-ban-morrison-frydenberg/13171568
  19. Informative
    Delicieuxz got a reaction from Moonzy in Canada to follow Australia's lead in taxing Facebook for news links, gov't says they won't be intimidated by Facebook's threats   
    Pay up, Zuck: Canada allies with Australia in ‘battle’ against Facebook over news content
     
    As has been previously reported, Australia planned to implement a link tax to create revenue for its domestic news outlets whenever someone accessed an article of theirs through search engines and social media sites.
     
    In reaction, Google and Facebook threatened to withdraw their services from Australia. Google backed-down after Microsoft made clear it was ready and eager to step-in and fill the search-engine void that would be left by Google. But I guess Microsoft didn't also have a Facebook replacement on-hand, and so Facebook didn't also back down.
     
    In response to Australia moving ahead with drafting legislation to tax media-sharing sites, Facebook has blocked the sharing of any links from Australia.
     
     
     
    But this post claims it goes even further, saying that people from Australia can no longer share any news-related links, period. I wonder if that claim is accurate, or if she meant that they just can't share Australian news links / news links created by Australians even when they're hosted on a platform that is based outside of Australia.
     

     
     
    Canada's government had previously announced its intention to tax media links and that it was monitoring developments in France and Australia regarding securing compensation for domestic news outlets from media-sharing sites.
     
     
    I think this is a mixed bag of negatives and positives. Taking revenue, and therefore power, away from tech giants who honestly don't deserve nearly what they've gained through their shady, exploitative, and manipulative business models is a good thing. But Australian and Canadian content disappearing from media sites is a bad thing. But then, if enough countries do this, so that media-sharing sites have no alternative but to allow their content, then that's a good thing. And if Facebook doesn't yield and it results in other platforms permanently taking-away Facebook's market share, I think that's also a good thing.
  20. Agree
    Delicieuxz got a reaction from IAmAndre in EA to buy racing game developer Codemasters for $1.2 billion   
    If DiRT4 is the only EA Play game you'd be interested in, you can buy it for cheaper than the regular price of a month of EA Play.
     
    https://www.greenmangaming.com/games/dirt-4/
     
    Even cheaper: https://www.fanatical.com/en/game/dirt-4
  21. Agree
    Delicieuxz reacted to Drama Lama in World Wide Web creator, Tim Berners-Lee, sad to see his invention being used for evil, hatches plan to take it back   
    My problems aren't Ads. I'm perfectly fine with them if they enable a service to be free but my Problem is tracking
  22. Informative
    Delicieuxz reacted to Mark Kaine in World Wide Web creator, Tim Berners-Lee, sad to see his invention being used for evil, hatches plan to take it back   
    my Google account uses proton mail lol... it's pretty weird I guess but it works... 
     
    But big downside is if you ever have to recover your password - which I actually forget how that works... 🤔
    then all your data up to the point of password reset is... actually, being deleted. 
    which has to do with their encryption thing, but in the end is pretty dumb - or rather inconvenient. 
     
    ps: initially I've chosen it because I thought it's the most secure option - but meanwhile I really like it because it's the *best looking* option. 
     
    I wish everything on the internet would look this good instead of Google 'design language' that is really only designed to be most uncomfortable to use while obfuscating  Googles true intentions - which is to make the user click 'yes' without even thinking... (aka brainwashing) 
  23. Like
    Delicieuxz got a reaction from Tristerin in World Wide Web creator, Tim Berners-Lee, sad to see his invention being used for evil, hatches plan to take it back   
    He made it past the sharks with laser-eyes but fell to the sentinel guards. Tim Berners-Lee has studied their attack pattern and won't make the same mistake. Hopefully.
  24. Agree
    Delicieuxz reacted to Blue4130 in My friend is DDOS atacking me   
    Faking a police call is a great way to get YOU in trouble, not them. 
  25. Agree
    Delicieuxz got a reaction from lewdicrous in World Wide Web creator, Tim Berners-Lee, sad to see his invention being used for evil, hatches plan to take it back   
    He made it past the sharks with laser-eyes but fell to the sentinel guards. Tim Berners-Lee has studied their attack pattern and won't make the same mistake. Hopefully.
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