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Where is the CMOS located?

When doing a quick google search for CMOS and where it is located, google always shows up with coin battery onboard the motherboard cuz nobody cares about the location of the CMOS and only care about resetting/clearing the CMOS. So, does anyone know where the CMOS is actually located on a motherboard or what is looks like on a Asus or EVGA motherboard? Cuz google keeps on giving me suggestions on HOW to reset the CMOS and where the CMOS battery is located, but NOT where the actual CMOS is located

 

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the CMOS battery is the CMOS

 

the CMOS data is stored in the CMOS battery

Main PC:  MacBook Air (M1, 2020), 8GB of RAM, 256GB of storage; running macOS, but waiting for Linux to be ported to the M1

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18 minutes ago, NunoLava1998 said:

the CMOS battery is the CMOS

 

the CMOS data is stored in the CMOS battery

What? Where have you read such rubbish?! That's not even close to being true. You could just apply the same voltage to the CMOS-battery-holder's contacts from any random power-source and it'd behave exactly the same, and you obviously cannot store any data on a random power-source.

Hand, n. A singular instrument worn at the end of the human arm and commonly thrust into somebody’s pocket.

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25 minutes ago, Local Moonman said:

When doing a quick google search for CMOS and where it is located, google always shows up with coin battery onboard the motherboard cuz nobody cares about the location of the CMOS and only care about resetting/clearing the CMOS. So, does anyone know where the CMOS is actually located on a motherboard or what is looks like on a Asus or EVGA motherboard? Cuz google keeps on giving me suggestions on HOW to reset the CMOS and where the CMOS battery is located, but NOT where the actual CMOS is located

The CMOS-data is actually a misnomer; the data is held in real-time clock's, ie. the RTC's, volatile memory. On older PCs RTC was a separate component, but these days it's built into the southbridge itself.

Hand, n. A singular instrument worn at the end of the human arm and commonly thrust into somebody’s pocket.

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Google and Wiki know more than most people... that is not the problem. The problem is no one wants to use Google or Wiki...

 

"Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor, Static Random Access Memory" =/= "CR2032 3v Lithium Power Cell"

 

The battery is exactly that, a battery that powers a low power state memory system. The memory system is usually a chip or on the chip for the bios.

[edit]

Ah, nice, as WereCatf says, it's in the southbridge now? Cool. :)

 

Why do you need the CMOS? You can take the battery out/put back in to reset some data. You can use the "reset" header/jumper/buttons on motherboard to reset some data. Or some allow you to swap the entire BIOS chip out to swap that data... what do you wish to do?

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