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(CPU) Generally speaking, are AIOs better in terms of cooling than big air coolers?

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Go to solution Solved by GuiltySpark_,

Many factors that go into this so its not always going to be a hard yes. What IS usually a hard yes is that with flagship CPU's, the top of the range high power output models, a big AIO is generally going to keep the CPU cooler for extended high load use cases. 

 

Outside of that, often its more of a formfactor, personal preference or sound based decision. Does this mean air coolers are better? No. Water coolers? No. 

 

It depends.

I have a Dark Rock Pro 4, it's really nice and quiet overall but I've been wanting to buy an AIO with screen (for the looks, hehe). I'd probably look for 240mm radiators (or 280mm if I change my pc case)

 

If I were to do so, should I expect better temps or about the same?

 

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Many factors that go into this so its not always going to be a hard yes. What IS usually a hard yes is that with flagship CPU's, the top of the range high power output models, a big AIO is generally going to keep the CPU cooler for extended high load use cases. 

 

Outside of that, often its more of a formfactor, personal preference or sound based decision. Does this mean air coolers are better? No. Water coolers? No. 

 

It depends.

ITX & Ultrawide Enthusiast

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No. They are just a different way of moving heat. Instead of heatpipes they use water in tubes. Keep in mind that performance won't improve unless you get the highest end ones because your dark rock pro 4 is already a top of the line cooler.

 

If you want a screen in your case do it properly and get something actually nice instead of those mediocre small things.

 

Or raspberry pi options

 

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Just now, GuiltySpark_ said:

Many factors that go into this so its not always going to be a hard yes. What IS usually a hard yes is that with flagship CPU's, the top of the range high power output models, a big AIO is generally going to keep the CPU cooler for extended high load use cases. 

 

Outside of that, often its more of a formfactor, personal preference or sound based decision. Does this mean air coolers are better? No. Water coolers? No. 

 

It depends.

You know what they say. The bigger the better am i right 😜 (Joking of course)

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My air cooled temps on 5900X were better than many using same cpu with AIO.

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1 hour ago, Noble3212 said:

Strangeeeeee. 

Not really. A dark rock pro 4, ndhs15,... all perform as good as a lot of 360mm if not better. Only by getting the real high end models (note expensive DOES NOT MEAN BETTER the arctic freezer II 360mm beats almost anything and is amongst the cheapest) do you start going past air coolers.

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31 minutes ago, jaslion said:

Not really. A dark rock pro 4, ndhs15,... all perform as good as a lot of 360mm if not better. Only by getting the real high end models (note expensive DOES NOT MEAN BETTER the arctic freezer II 360mm beats almost anything and is amongst the cheapest) do you start going past air coolers.

*Depending on the CPU. 

ITX & Ultrawide Enthusiast

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3 hours ago, GuiltySpark_ said:

*Depending on the CPU. 

Not really? A heatsink is a heatsink. It has set limits on what it can do. A 12600k is gonna heat up just as much on an identical aicooler or heatsink.

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