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Making my NAS accessible on Wifi as well as Ethernet

Mel0n.
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Moved into my dorm room today, I have a NAS set up (shared via Windows shared folder) connected to Ethernet. There's a switch and a router in my room, the router is plugged into the switch. 

Quite a novice at networks so I'm probably asking a very dumb question. Sorry in advance.
But, since the router is plugged into the same switch shouldn't I be able to access shared folders over Wifi as well? I can access them over Ethernet just fine but the NAS doesn't show up on wifi. Do I need a wifi card in the NAS? Or have I just configured something wrong? Should I just ask my school's IT guy?

Gigabyte GA-D525TUD motherboard, using Realtek onboard Ethernet + 20 year old Intel gigabit card

Not sure of switch or router model. I can't reach them to read the labels.

I'm not a professional, just an enthusiast. I don't know everything.

HGST Ultrastar: The last HDD you'll ever need to buy (and the one I always recommend).

Schrödinger's CPU: The Q9650. Is it irrelevant? Is it not? 

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I think we're going to need a diagram of your network setup.

 

If your router's WAN port is plugged into a network port on the wall, and your NAS is plugged into your router's LAN port, you won't see it unless you're also "on the inside" of your router (either plugged into its LAN ports or connected to its WiFi). That setup treats the campus network like the outside Internet at home, you won't be able to access anything "on the inside" without knowing your external IP address and port forwarding through your router.

Dell owns my soul.

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3 hours ago, Needfuldoer said:

I think we're going to need a diagram of your network setup.

 

If your router's WAN port is plugged into a network port on the wall, and your NAS is plugged into your router's LAN port, you won't see it unless you're also "on the inside" of your router (either plugged into its LAN ports or connected to its WiFi). That setup treats the campus network like the outside Internet at home, you won't be able to access anything "on the inside" without knowing your external IP address and port forwarding through your router.

I guess the correct word is not router. WAP perhaps? It doesn't have any Ethernet ports except for one, which is an in. So I suppose it takes the Ethernet network signal but makes it wireless? Terribly sorry, I have no idea how to explain it otherwise.

Like this. The white line is the Ethernet cable running into my room through a conduit. Comes from... not sure where. Goes into the switch, the white box (WAP?) is plugged into the switch. There's another Ethernet cable on the switch but it goes back through the wall, probably to a camera or another room. Or another access point.

image.thumb.png.0535c6657c0de91dc419b9fb8a07574c.png

I'm not a professional, just an enthusiast. I don't know everything.

HGST Ultrastar: The last HDD you'll ever need to buy (and the one I always recommend).

Schrödinger's CPU: The Q9650. Is it irrelevant? Is it not? 

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14 minutes ago, Mel0n. said:

I guess the correct word is not router. WAP perhaps?

Does it have a model number?

 

So you think some other device is connected via your room?

 

Just doodle up a "what's connected to where" flowchart diagram in Paint, please.

Dell owns my soul.

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2 hours ago, Needfuldoer said:

Does it have a model number?

 

So you think some other device is connected via your room?

 

Just doodle up a "what's connected to where" flowchart diagram in Paint, please.

Sorry, I can't reach it to look at any model number on the back, none is visible. It's made by Aerohive, though, and looking it up they do make access points. 

 

Yeah something else is connected, not sure what it is. Says there's activity on that line, switch lights are blinking, so I don't want to unplug and find out the hard way.

image.thumb.png.5056bbbb070de9989c9fb7cb692f7310.png

I'm not a professional, just an enthusiast. I don't know everything.

HGST Ultrastar: The last HDD you'll ever need to buy (and the one I always recommend).

Schrödinger's CPU: The Q9650. Is it irrelevant? Is it not? 

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Are the switch and access point yours, or the school's? That sounds like part of a managed wireless network.

 

Depending on how they have their network set up, you might not have access to wired clients from the WiFi. (And like I said, if they're not on the same subnet you won't see your NAS's "here I am" broadcasts.)

 

See if you can ping your NAS from the WiFi.

Dell owns my soul.

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2 hours ago, Needfuldoer said:

Are the switch and access point yours, or the school's? That sounds like part of a managed wireless network.

 

Depending on how they have their network set up, you might not have access to wired clients from the WiFi. (And like I said, if they're not on the same subnet you won't see your NAS's "here I am" broadcasts.)

 

See if you can ping your NAS from the WiFi.

They are my school's. I'll try and ping it as you recommended.

I'm not a professional, just an enthusiast. I don't know everything.

HGST Ultrastar: The last HDD you'll ever need to buy (and the one I always recommend).

Schrödinger's CPU: The Q9650. Is it irrelevant? Is it not? 

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15 hours ago, Mel0n. said:

They are my school's. I'll try and ping it as you recommended.

I'd be a bit wary, if you're plugging your NAS straight into their network then unless they are isolating it some way you could be leaving it opens to anyone else also plugged into the network.  So its possibly a good sign its not showing up on the WiFi, if it means its being isolated from the schools network.

Router:  Intel Celeron N5105 (pfSense) WiFi: Zyxel NWA210AX (1.44Gbit peak at 160Mhz 2x2 MIMO, ~900Mbit at 80Mhz)

Switches: Netgear MS510TXUP, Netgear MS510TXPP, Netgear GS110EMX
ISPs: Zen Full Fibre 900 (~915Mbit) + Three 5G (~500Mbit average)

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9 hours ago, Alex Atkin UK said:

I'd be a bit wary, if you're plugging your NAS straight into their network then unless they are isolating it some way you could be leaving it opens to anyone else also plugged into the network.  So its possibly a good sign its not showing up on the WiFi, if it means its being isolated from the schools network.

It's got a username and password, and no one at this school even knows their own so I think I'm fine there. It does run Windows 7, but I've patched it as much as I can. 

I'm not a professional, just an enthusiast. I don't know everything.

HGST Ultrastar: The last HDD you'll ever need to buy (and the one I always recommend).

Schrödinger's CPU: The Q9650. Is it irrelevant? Is it not? 

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