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Utility Networks (Interesting?)

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I'm just putting this topic out there to see if there's interest in how utilities deploy PC's and networks in substation and generation facilities.  Here are bullets of some of the more unique features.  

  • System A and System B equipment and networks on redundant battery plants.  Redundant networks, battery chargers, AC feed, cable trays, etc.
  • PC's, switches, firewalls, all equipment is powered off 125VDC.
  • Almost all equipment is passively cooled (no fans) and rated for -40 to 85C.
  • All Ethernet ports are fiber 100Mb, 1Gb, and 10Gb to avoid EMP, ground potential rise, and other transients.
  • Switches are fanless and modular so they can handle potentially 6 different media spread across 26-28 ports in 1 Rack Unit.  They use hot swappable, redundant power supplies.
  • Network topology is often HSR or PRP or a combination.  Double rendundancies.  It's more robust compared to a standard ring or hub and spoke and failovers are totally hitless.
  • All relays have redundant fiber Ethernet ports (Active & Failover) which are configured with the same exact IP address.
  • All equipment can receive sub 1uSec GPS clock synchronization via Ethernet connections (IEEE1588) with multiple clock inputs from local and potentially distant clock sources.  Switches are specialized to carry this signal.
  • PC's are covered in heat syncs to be fanless -40C to 85C rated.
  • Security equipment deploys technology such as IR, Glassbreak sensors (if windows exist at all), microwave beams (for intrusion detection), PTZ cameras, and fiber optic cable (used on fences and walls to detect vibration from intruders or heat detection in underground ducts).
  • Ethernet encryption can be as strict as generating new AES-256 keys after EVERY PACKET in a IP connection.

 

There are more but these items are the bigger ones.  Media conversion, encryption, and multiplexing are pretty big but probably less fitting in this forum.  It's a topic that I found interesting and thought others might find interesting as well.  I can elaborate on any topic.

It's an industry starving for fresh talent and pays well.

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Is this a job posting or a status update?  

 

I agree, the utility companies can pay well and be good longterm jobs.  However, it's incredibly boring and you will be expected to cover 247 on call shifts.

 

This also varies by location.  In some parts of the usa, they're using dated tech and have little to no support services so I imagine the pay at those places would be crap.

 

What you should be looking for is nuclear plant positions, that's the real big money in utilities. 

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 1/29/2022 at 9:59 AM, Heliian said:

Is this a job posting or a status update?  

 

I agree, the utility companies can pay well and be good longterm jobs.  However, it's incredibly boring and you will be expected to cover 247 on call shifts.

 

This also varies by location.  In some parts of the usa, they're using dated tech and have little to no support services so I imagine the pay at those places would be crap.

 

What you should be looking for is nuclear plant positions, that's the real big money in utilities. 

I was just sizing up people's and LMG's possible interest in a different system architecture from the norm.  Your response is written like you only read the last comment at the end.  And you assume incorrectly about how that work is done, who does it, and the level of pay. No from the engineering firm is on call.  Lol.  Also the system is so robust that the minor alarm triggered by let's say fiber breaks wouldn't need to be addressed by the utility employees until the next day.

 

It wasn't a job posting.  Just an observation I was making about the industry.  Electrical and Mechanical Engineers at firms make a decent living.  Perhaps it's crap to you.

I'm regularly engineering for the local nuclear plant and their lack of drawing standards is a big pet peeve.  We staff about 12 full time engineers inside the plant.  Glad I'm not there full time though.

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