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Hard Drive Shucking

Go to solution Solved by AbydosOne,
11 minutes ago, RJ45-Dude said:

Does it work with any kind of external hard drive (for example, this is my hard drive: https://amzn.to/3og7Zv2), or does it have to be specifically larger external hard drives (for example: https://amzn.to/3I8DYFA)?

Some (not necessarily all) 2.5" portable HDDs have the USB port integrated right into the PCB, so there's no standard SATA to connect to. Also, generally, the price to capacity just isn't there to warrant it. Usually the 3.5" (larger) drives are where the incentive to shuck comes in. (Even then, IIRC the 6TB WDs are SMR Blues internally; would recommend 8TB and up for CMR higher-performance drives).

 

12 minutes ago, RJ45-Dude said:

Also, when watching tutorials on how to shuck hard drives, I learned that there is a pin on the hard drive itself you must cover up, as this pin controls the hard drive's power. However, in the tutorial, the hard drive had a button, while my hard drive (listed above) does not. Do I still have to cover up that pin?

This is the PWDIS pin, which is technically part of the newest ATX power standard. It uses the 3.3V rail pulled low to start the drive spinning. The downside being that most (all?) PSUs out there today still provide 3.3V over SATA power, and hence will hold the drive spun-down if it isn't fixed. Furthermore, this feature's presence varies from model to model and even drive to drive inside a specific model (call them sub-models). The safest way is to just make sure you don't feed 3.3V to and drive by either taping over the pins or removing the wire from the connector (if it happens to be one of the modular ones), but it isn't always strictly necessary.

 

In regards to this button: I'm not aware of any internal HDDs that have any form of user interface like that. They're all just plug and go as far as I'm aware.

 

Bonus tidbit: the PWDIS actually has a use in server-space (where a lot of the excess drives funneled into the external market come from), so that the system can stagger the spin-up of all the drives in the case of a 24 drive disk shelf, etc., and not overload the PSU. 

Hi, kinda newbie to the tech world here. I had two questions about hard-drive shucking...

Does it work with any kind of external hard drive (for example, this is my hard drive: https://amzn.to/3og7Zv2), or does it have to be specifically larger external hard drives (for example: https://amzn.to/3I8DYFA)?

Also, when watching tutorials on how to shuck hard drives, I learned that there is a pin on the hard drive itself you must cover up, as this pin controls the hard drive's power. However, in the tutorial, the hard drive had a button, while my hard drive (listed above) does not. Do I still have to cover up that pin?

 

Thanks to anyone who helps.

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15 minutes ago, RJ45-Dude said:

Does it work with any kind of external hard drive (for example, this is my hard drive: https://amzn.to/3og7Zv2),

It should work as long as there's a 3.5 inch drive in there. There appears to be one in there, so it should work. The main reason people do it on higher capacity drives is that on these lower end ones, it doesn't make financial sense to do it - you lose a warranty, have extra work, and generally aren't saving much, if any money doing this. 

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11 minutes ago, RJ45-Dude said:

Does it work with any kind of external hard drive (for example, this is my hard drive: https://amzn.to/3og7Zv2), or does it have to be specifically larger external hard drives (for example: https://amzn.to/3I8DYFA)?

Some (not necessarily all) 2.5" portable HDDs have the USB port integrated right into the PCB, so there's no standard SATA to connect to. Also, generally, the price to capacity just isn't there to warrant it. Usually the 3.5" (larger) drives are where the incentive to shuck comes in. (Even then, IIRC the 6TB WDs are SMR Blues internally; would recommend 8TB and up for CMR higher-performance drives).

 

12 minutes ago, RJ45-Dude said:

Also, when watching tutorials on how to shuck hard drives, I learned that there is a pin on the hard drive itself you must cover up, as this pin controls the hard drive's power. However, in the tutorial, the hard drive had a button, while my hard drive (listed above) does not. Do I still have to cover up that pin?

This is the PWDIS pin, which is technically part of the newest ATX power standard. It uses the 3.3V rail pulled low to start the drive spinning. The downside being that most (all?) PSUs out there today still provide 3.3V over SATA power, and hence will hold the drive spun-down if it isn't fixed. Furthermore, this feature's presence varies from model to model and even drive to drive inside a specific model (call them sub-models). The safest way is to just make sure you don't feed 3.3V to and drive by either taping over the pins or removing the wire from the connector (if it happens to be one of the modular ones), but it isn't always strictly necessary.

 

In regards to this button: I'm not aware of any internal HDDs that have any form of user interface like that. They're all just plug and go as far as I'm aware.

 

Bonus tidbit: the PWDIS actually has a use in server-space (where a lot of the excess drives funneled into the external market come from), so that the system can stagger the spin-up of all the drives in the case of a 24 drive disk shelf, etc., and not overload the PSU. 

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2 minutes ago, RONOTHAN## said:

you lose a warranty

Fun fact: you don't lose the warrantee when you shuck. Just threaten the manufacturer with the Magnuson–Moss Warranty Act and reporting them to the FTC and they'll generally comply.

 

4 minutes ago, RONOTHAN## said:

generally aren't saving much, if any money doing this

You'll almost always save money doing this for larger drives: WD Easystore 14TB = (currently) $250; WD Gold 14TB (basically the same drive) $385.

Main System (Byarlant): Ryzen 5 1600X | Asus B350-F Strix | Corsair H80i V2 | 16GB G.Skill DDR4 3200MHz CAS-14 | XFX RX 5600 XT THICC II | Samsung 960 PRO 512GB / Samsung 970 EVO 500GB / UMIS SSD 256GB / Crucial MX500 2TB / WD White 7200RPM 8TB | Corsair CX650M | Mellanox ConnectX-3 10G NIC | Anidees AI-07BW Case | Dell U3415W Monitor | Microsoft Modern Keyboard

 

TrueNAS Server (Veda): Xeon E3-1241v3 | Supermicro X10SLL-F | Corsair H60 | 32GB Micron DDR3L ECC 1600MHz | 4x 10TB WD Whites / 2x 1TB HGST 2.5" / 1x Samsung PM961 128GB SSD / 1x Kingston 16GB SSD | Seasonic Prime Fanless 500W | Mellanox ConnectX-3 10G NIC | LSI 9207-8i LBA | Fractal Design Node 804 Case (side panels swapped to show off drives)

 

Media Center/Video Capture (Jesta): Core i7-2600 | Asus H77M-PRO | Stock Cooler | 8GB No-name DDR3 | EVGA GTX750Ti SC | Sandisk UltraII SSD 64GB / Seagate 1.5TB HDD | Corsair CX450M | Hauppauge ImpactVCB-PCIe | Syba USB3.1 Gen 2 Card | LG UH12NS30 BD-ROM | Silverstone Sugo SG-11 Case

 

Laptop (Narrative): Lenovo Flex 5 81X20005US | Ryzen 5 4500U | 16GB RAM (soldered) | Vega 6 Graphics | SKHynix P31 1TB NVMe SSD | (all-around awesome machine)

Laptop (Rozen-ZuluSony VAIO VPCF13WFX | Core i7-740QM | 8GB Patriot DDR3 | GT 425M | Kingston 120GB SSD | Blu-ray Drive | (lived a good life, retired with honor)

 

Tablet (---): Samsung Galaxy Tab A 8" (crosses fingers)
Tablet (ReGZ)Asus T102HA (BIOS clock doesn't tick, loses time when sleep/off) (I kill tablets with disturbing regularity)

Tablet (Unicorn)Surface Pro 2 (battery will reset total capacity to current charge, leading Windows to think it's always 100% charged until it dies)

Tablet (Loto)Dell Venue 8 Pro (screen discoloration issues, wouldn't update to Windows 10)

Tablet: iPad 2 16GB (WiFi died, basically useless after that)

 

Testbed/Old Desktop (Kshatriya): Xeon X5470 @ 4.0GHz | ZALMAN CNPS9500 | Gigabyte EP45-UD3L | 8GB Nanya DDR2 400MHz | XFX HD6870 DD | OCZ Vertex 3 Max-IOPS 120GB | Corsair CX430M (?) | HooToo USB 3.0 PCIe Card | NZXT H230 Case

 

Camera: Sony ɑ7II (w/ Meike Grip) | Sony SEL24240 | Samyang 35mm ƒ/2.8 | Sony SEL50F18F | Sony SEL2870 (kit lens) | PNY Elite Perfomance SDXC cards

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1 minute ago, AbydosOne said:

You'll almost always save money doing this for larger drives: WD Easystore 14TB = (currently) $250; WD Gold 14TB (basically the same drive) $385.

Yeah, I was implying that with the lower capacity drives (~4TB or less). Probably could've clarified a little better. Big drives is where you should consider doing this.

 

Interesting to know about the warranty claims though. 

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Thanks, guys. Since it's only one terabyte, I don't think I'll shuck it; too much work when I could just get something cheaper with more storage. Thanks anyways.

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2 hours ago, AbydosOne said:

Fun fact: you don't lose the warrantee when you shuck. Just threaten the manufacturer with the Magnuson–Moss Warranty Act and reporting them to the FTC and they'll generally comply.

 

 

This assumes that one is in the usa. That doesn't work for other countries. 

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