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What is PD in a thunderbolt 3 port?

I bought a laptop a few weeks ago. It's a Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Extreme Gen 3. It has two thunderbolt 3 ports that are said to be PD, or Power Delivery. Does that mean they can charge devices, or they can be used to charge my laptop? I'm asking because the 135 Watt charger that came with my laptop is a little big, and if I want to bring my laptop and a charger somewhere but keep it all low profile (such as in a laptop sleeve), then it would be nice to be able to just bring a small wall charger and USB C cable. Any information or tips would be very helpful. Thanks in advance.

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I believe USB-PD generally means that it can accept large amounts of power, not supply it.

 

Your laptop, with a quick search, seems to support USB-C charging. It will probably do so at up to 100W, the USB-PD max spec, so it won't charge as fast as with your proper charger. The battery may even still drain while charging, depending on the size of the charger used.

My PCs:

Quote

Timothy: 

i7 4790k

16GB Corsair Vengeance DDR3

ASUS GTX 1060 6GB

Corsair Carbide 300R

 

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1 hour ago, tim0901 said:

I believe USB-PD generally means that it can accept large amounts of power, not supply it.

 

Your laptop, with a quick search, seems to support USB-C charging. It will probably do so at up to 100W, the USB-PD max spec, so it won't charge as fast as with your proper charger. The battery may even still drain while charging, depending on the size of the charger used.

I was planning on buying whatever is the highest watt-charger size ratio charger there is... if there's a 100 Watt charger that's small enough to fit in my pocket, then great... but so far I've been looking at a 65 Watt one that's only a couple inches wide.

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I'd give real money to stop seeing non-Thunderbolt USB-C ports in ALL future laptops.  I mean, seriously, it only costs about £20 extra per port to make them Thunderbolt3 capable? Most people would be happy to pay that.

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